Business Newsroom

La Trobe Business School

Tag: LBS Innovation Series

LBS Innovation Series: Is big data the answer for the future of agribusiness?

Scott McKenzie, Chief Executive Officer at SensaData, used the company’s Smart-r-Tag as a case study to explain the digitisation of supply chains and the effect of the IoT on Australia’s food and agribusiness.

About Scott

Scott’s background is in open innovation, design and commercialisation, engineering and project management. He previously led technology development initiatives in diverse fields to deliver the scaling and risk reduction for the transfer of technologies from the laboratory to industry, coordinating research providers and industry groups including multinational OEs.

The Smart-r-Tags

With industry vendors, commentators and researchers advocating IoT adoption across the agriculture and food production sector, it is worth looking to approach implementations in stages with clear objectives and referring to practices, challenges, and outcomes in other domains. Scott explores implementation through the Smart-r-Tag. These tags can be attached to a carton, crate or pallet and will show the product’s location, temperature, surrounding air-quality and handling throughout its transit from supplier to wholesaler, distributor and retailer. Data generated by the system is transferred to cloud systems for generation of knowledge and insights through analytics, and presentation to end users and clients for alerts and reporting.

Please enjoy Scott´s presentation.

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School. 
 
More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:
- LBS Innovation Series: Gaps to perfection
- LBS Innovation Series: Building a global business in a period of disruption
- LBS Innovation Series: Is the Australian agriculture sector ready to grow?
- LBS Innovation Series: Agtech – Agriculture’s Disrupter or Saviour?
- LBS Innovation Series: Crossing the Chasm – Agtech & innovation ecosystems
- LBS Innovation Series: Innovation and the Agribusiness Taskforce
- LBS Innovation Series: Supply challenges and consumer expectations
- LBS Innovation Series: Robotics and AI are coming your way
- LBS Innovation Series: Consumer trends and future foods
-LBS Innovation Series: The future of agricultural production systems
- LBS Innovation Series: Cities that feed our planet

LBS Innovation Series: Cities that feed our planet

Serena Lee and Geert Hendrix from Farmwall gave a presentation during the 2018 Innovation in Food and Agribusiness Forum (IFAF) showing how their aquaponic vertical garden is turning cities into food producing ecosystems that positively impact the environment and inspire others to do the same.

About Farmwall

Farmwall is an agrifood-tech start-up that designs urban farming technology and experiences to enhance fresh produce accessibility in the city. The company’s flagship product is the Farmwall – a small-scale indoor farm the size of a bookcase that grows and stores microgreens, herbs and leafy greens in a nicely designed natural ecosystem, eliminating packaging waste and food miles. Every Farmwall has a gut made of clay balls, which keeps all the good bacteria in balance and allows the food to grow naturally, without enclosing or sterilising it. There are fish at the bottom of the Farmwall, creating a colourless gas called ammonia. The good bacteria transform this gas into nitrates for the plants. Farmwall leases the infrastructure on an end-to-end service model, based on a monthly subscription.

The Farmwall (Photo by Goodsmiths)
The Farmwall (Photo by Goodsmiths)

Cities that feed our planet

The delivery of sustainability is shifting through the rise of the experience economy, the push for health and wellness within our urban landscape, and innovations in AgTech. In their presentation, Farmwall showcases how a combination of technology and customer service can bring meaningful experiences through food, with positive social and environmental outcomes. The mindset of staying agile and embracing a disruptive business model has brought the start-up one step closer to their vision of creating “cities that feed our planet”.

Please enjoy Farmwall´s presentation.

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School. 
 
More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:
- LBS Innovation Series: Gaps to perfection
- LBS Innovation Series: Building a global business in a period of disruption
- LBS Innovation Series: Is the Australian agriculture sector ready to grow?
- LBS Innovation Series: Agtech – Agriculture’s Disrupter or Saviour?
- LBS Innovation Series: Crossing the Chasm – Agtech & innovation ecosystems
- LBS Innovation Series: Innovation and the Agribusiness Taskforce
- LBS Innovation Series: Supply challenges and consumer expectations
- LBS Innovation Series: Robotics and AI are coming your way
- LBS Innovation Series: Consumer trends and future foods
- LBS Innovation Series: The future of agricultural production systems

LBS Innovation Series: The future of agricultural production systems

At the 2018 Innovation in Food and Agribusiness Forum, Professor Tony Bacic, Director of the La Trobe Institute of Agriculture & Food, provided an overview of Australia’s agriculture sector, its research, production and institutional challenges, and global opportunities.

About Tony

Tony is internationally recognised as a leader in plant biotechnology. His research is focused on the structure, function and biosynthesis of plant cell walls and their biotechnological application as well as the application of functional genomics tools in biological systems.
From 1996 to 2017, Professor Bacic held a Personal Chair in the School of BioSciences at the University of Melbourne, was Leader of the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls team at the University of Melbourne (2011-2017), and also spent time as Deputy Director of that Centre, and Director of the Plant Cell Biology Research Centre at the School of BioSciences. Tony is a current Board Member of the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria. Tony is a James Cook University Outstanding Alumnus (2010) and a La Trobe University Distinguished Alumnus (2013).

La Trobe Institute of Agriculture & Food

Besides the future of agricultural production and science systems, Tony talks about the La Trobe Institute of Agriculture & Food (LIAF). The LIAF’s aim is to tackle the issues of growing enough food to meet future world demand and exploring the benefits of medicinal agriculture. This includes a focus on crop diversification and changing diets and research that considers the crop plant environment (e.g. Golden Soil), identifies innovative methods for improved production of specialty grains (e.g. Fit-for-Purpose Seeds) and develops enhanced nutritional quality and medicinal benefits (e.g. Quality Dietary Fibre and medical marijuana).

Please enjoy Tony’s presentation.



This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School. 

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:
- LBS Innovation Series: Gaps to perfection
- LBS Innovation Series: Building a global business in a period of disruption
- LBS Innovation Series: Is the Australian agriculture sector ready to grow?
- LBS Innovation Series: Agtech – Agriculture’s Disrupter or Saviour?
- LBS Innovation Series: Crossing the Chasm – Agtech & innovation ecosystems
- LBS Innovation Series: Innovation and the Agribusiness Taskforce
- LBS Innovation Series: Supply challenges and consumer expectations
- LBS Innovation Series: Robotics and AI are coming your way
- LBS Innovation Series: Consumer trends and future foods

LBS Innovation Series: Consumer trends and future foods

During the 2018 Innovation in Food and Agribusiness Forum, Professor Harsharn Gill gave a very insightful presentation on global consumer food and dietary trends and the opportunities and challenges that this presents for the Australian food industry.

About Harsharn

Professor Harsharn Gill is Head of the Food Research & Innovation Centre at RMIT University. He has over 25 years’ experience in leading and managing food, nutrition and health R&D in private and public sectors. Prior to joining RMIT, he held senior R&D leadership roles in Australia and New Zealand, including Research Director at the Department of Primary Industries Victoria; Chair of Functional Foods & Human Health at Massey University, and Director of Milk & Health Research Centre at Fonterra, New Zealand. Harsharn has published widely and his research contributions have been recognised nationally and internationally with several awards and appointments to international expert panels, including World Health Organisation (WHO), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF).

Developments and trends

By 2050 the world’s population will be 10 billion and we will need to increase food calorie production by 69% to meet demand. Population growth is not the only reason more food is needed, there is also a spread of prosperity across the world, especially in China and India, which increases demand for meat, eggs, and dairy, and boosts pressure to grow more corn and soybeans to feed more livestock. So, how can we increase the availability of food while simultaneously reducing pressure on the environment? There is currently a trend toward more plant-based products and Harsharn sees great opportunity in Australia for developing and marketing plant-derived protein products.

Please enjoy Harsharn’s presentation.



This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School. 

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:
- LBS Innovation Series: Gaps to perfection
- LBS Innovation Series: Building a global business in a period of disruption
- LBS Innovation Series: Is the Australian agriculture sector ready to grow?
- LBS Innovation Series: Agtech – Agriculture’s Disrupter or Saviour?
- LBS Innovation Series: Crossing the Chasm – Agtech & innovation ecosystems
- LBS Innovation Series: Innovation and the Victorian Chamber’s Agribusiness Taskforce
- LBS Innovation Series: Supply challenges and consumer expectations
- LBS Innovation Series: Robotics and AI are coming your way

LBS Innovation Series: Robotics and AI are coming your way

Watch Professor Peter Corke give a presentation about robotics, AI and computer vision technologies with examples of what they mean for food production, and how they are changing the business environment.

About Peter

Peter Corke is Professor of Robotic Vision at Queensland University of Technology (QUT), and director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Robotic Vision. His research is concerned with enabling robots to see, and the application of robots to mining, agriculture and environmental monitoring. He is well known for his robotics toolbox software for MATLAB, the best-selling textbook “Robotics, Vision, and Control”, massive open online courses (MOOC) and the online Robot Academy. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering. Peter also has held several editorial board positions and held various visiting positions.

Agbots

Robotics technology is almost 60 years old. Artificial intelligence, particularly computer vision, has dramatically increased the fields into which robots can be employed. Peter’s talk covers examples of recent work, at QUT and elsewhere, will be used to illustrate what the near future entails. For example, pointing out that farm machinery control is largely a visual task, Peter suggests that with vison assisted robotics there can be an alternative future where multiple small (low land pressure) unmanned ground ‘agbots’ take the place of very large manned farm machinery (high land pressure).

Please enjoy Peter’s presentation.

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School.

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:
- LBS Innovation Series: Gaps to perfection
- LBS Innovation Series: Building a global business in a period of disruption
- LBS Innovation Series: Is the Australian agriculture sector ready to grow?
- LBS Innovation Series: Agtech – Agriculture’s Disrupter or Saviour?
- LBS Innovation Series: Crossing the Chasm – Agtech & innovation ecosystems
- Innovation Series: Innovation and the Victorian Chamber’s Agribusiness Taskforce
- LBS Innovation Series: Supply challenges and consumer expectations

LBS Innovation Series: Supply challenges and consumer expectations

In this presentation, Joe Manariti, General Manager Melbourne and Avocado Category at LaManna Premier Group (LPG), discusses the challenges of managing consumer expectations and the quality of farm management across the agribusiness value chain.

About Joe

Prior to joining LPG, Joe completed his Economics and Finance Degree at RMIT University, managed his family’s fresh produce retail business at the Queen Victoria Market and worked 3 years in financial planning. Joe joined LPG in 2011 in the role of Market Sales Manager at the Footscray Market, has progressed through the organisation, and now manages the Melbourne business. He is responsible for market sales and operations as well as two distribution centres in Footscray and Yarraville.  Joe is also responsible for LPG’s national avocado supply and sales program, national service provision, ripening and supply services. In March 2016, Joe was elected Advisory Board Member of the Melbourne Market Authority.

Search for efficiency

Joe’s presentation offers insights to innovation and research into diseases for different fruit and vegetable varieties from LPG experience. LPG is one of Australia’s largest fresh produce supply-chain companies and invests heavily in research and development, funding new frontiers in horticulture, packaging and cold transport and distribution. In his presentation, Joe emphasises the need to continue to search for efficiencies, which get products to consumers in the shortest possible time and in the best condition. In addition, Joe stresses the importance of gathering and analysing data to understand how the growing and harvest processes, transportation and retailers experiences affect consumer choices.

Please enjoy Joe’s presentation.



This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School.

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:
- LBS Innovation Series: Gaps to perfection
- LBS Innovation Series: Building a global business in a period of disruption
- LBS Innovation Series: Is the Australian agriculture sector ready to grow?
- LBS Innovation Series: Agtech – Agriculture’s Disrupter or Saviour?
- LBS Innovation Series: Crossing the Chasm – Agtech & innovation ecosystems
- LBS Innovation Series: Innovation and the Victorian Chamber’s Agribusiness Taskforce

LBS Innovation Series: Innovation and the Agribusiness Taskforce

Mark Stone AM is Chief Executive Officer at Victorian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (VCCI) and led the VCCI Agribusiness Taskforce, comprising of agribusiness representatives, academics and industry experts. In 2017, the VCCI Agribusiness Taskforce spent six months investigating the issues and opportunities facing the agribusiness sector in Victoria.

About Mark

As Chief Executive of the Victorian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Mark leads Victoria’s most influential business organisation. He is also a director on the Board of the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI), an Australia Day Ambassador and Fellow of the Williamson Leadership program. Prior to his role at VCCI, Mark spent 12 years as the Chief Executive of Tourism Victoria. Prior to that role he enjoyed a 12-year stint as Chief Executive of Parks Victoria, which employs 1200 staff and has a $4 billion asset base. In 2016, Mark was awarded an Order of Australia in the Queen’s Birthday Honours.

Taskforce – findings

In his presentation, Mark discusses why innovation in food and agriculture is important, where there is room for improvement but also industry challenges including technology adoption, understanding international consumer preferences and public funding of research and development. One of the findings of the VCCI Agribusiness Taskforce is the need for a stronger focus on innovation and quality. This includes early adoption of new technologies, stronger networks, clusters and services to support collaboration and commercialising innovation and research.

 Please enjoy Mark’s presentation.

Please access the full report here:

VCCI agribusiness taskforce report – Harvesting growth for Victoria

 

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School. 

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:
- LBS Innovation Series: Gaps to perfection
- LBS Innovation Series: Building a global business in a period of disruption
- LBS Innovation Series: Is the Australian agriculture sector ready to grow?
- LBS Innovation Series: Agtech – Agriculture’s Disrupter or Saviour?
- LBS Innovation Series: Crossing the Chasm – Agtech & innovation ecosystems

LBS Innovation Series: Crossing the Chasm – Agtech & innovation ecosystems

Over the last years, the agtech sector has taken off with a proliferation of agtech and foodtech accelerators and incubators across the country. Agtech will become increasingly important in driving Australia’s agricultural innovation but is the sector ready? Andrea Koch discusses how Australia can grow its own agriculture innovation ecosystem.

About Andrea

Andrea Koch is the Principal of Andrea Koch Agtech, an agricultural technology strategy, marketing and product development consultancy. Andrea is also a director with the National Farmers Federation Board and SproutX, Austalia’s first agtech accelerator.

Andrea holds a Bachelor of Business (Marketing) and a Master of Sustainable Development and is from a fifth-generation Australian farming family. Her family background and varied career allow her to bring together farming and digital technology. She sees a future where digital technology underpins our farming sector being the most competitive and innovative in the world.

The rural versus the urban world

Australia has a unique agricultural research, development and extension system and Andrea sees a divide between what she describes as the ‘rural world’ and the ‘urban world’. On the one side there are users of on-farm technology – that is the farmers and the ‘ecosystem’ of rural suppliers, advisors and consultants. On the other side, are the investment and finance community, tech developers, urban based research institutions and the agri-political groups. These worlds are somewhat disconnected, and Andrea presents some of the changes that are required.

Please enjoy Andrea’s presentation.



This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School.

More blogs in the 2019 LBS Innovation Series:

LBS Innovation Series: Agtech – Agriculture’s Disrupter or Saviour?

Disruptive technology is changing our daily lives and agriculture is not immune from this digital wave. Allan McCallum discusses whether we should see this new technology as a threat or embrace it as an opportunity.

About Allan

Allan is Chairman of Cann Group Limited, Australia’s first licensed/permitted grower of medicinal cannabis in Australia. Allan has led and been part of the team that instituted privatisation of the grain industry storage, handling and transport sector, (Vicgrain/ Graincorp) and the merging of regional based fertiliser businesses that became a global leader in explosives (Incitec Pivot). Via his work with Tassal, which is now a world leader in sustainable salmon production, Allan has been active in the restructure of the Tasmanian salmon industry.

Agtech

Agtech is an often used definition for various technology used in the agricultural industry. According to Start Up Australia, Agtech refers to the collection of digital technologies that provide the agricultural industry with the tools, data and knowledge to make more informed and timely on-farm decisions and improve productivity and sustainability.

Allan uses Cann Group Limited as a case study that shows that embracing agtech set then on a path to building a world-class Australian business in the emerging medicinal cannabis industry. He also focuses on the challenge of how to bring an agribusiness concept to market from a start-up to listing on the ASX in a period of rapid disruption.

Please enjoy Allan’s presentation.



This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School.

More blogs in the 2019 LBS Innovation Series:

LBS Innovation Series: Building a global business in a period of disruption

The first video of the 2019 LBS Innovation Series is by James Fazzino who gives a presentation on how the company he lead, Incitec Pivot, strategically responded to digital disruption in its core businesses.

About James

James is a La Trobe alumnus, holding a Bachelor of Economics (Honours) from the University, he is an Adjunct Professor in the La Trobe Business School and a Vice Chancellor’s Fellow. James was honoured with the Distinguished Alumni Award in 2018. He is a respected ASX 50 business leader and currently the Chair of Manufacturing Australia.

James has had a successful career in the international chemicals industry after concluding a highly successful eight-year term as Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director of Incitec Pivot Limited. He also served as the Chief Financial Officer and Finance Director at Incitec and had senior finance roles in ICI/Orica including CFO Chemicals Group, Assistant Treasurer and Head of Investor Relations.

Incitec Pivot Limited

Under James’ leadership, Incitec transformed from a fertiliser co-operative, operating in four Australian states with an enterprise value of $400 million, to a Global Diversified Industrial Chemicals company, operating in 13 countries and with an enterprise value of $8 billion. Incitec is now the world’s second largest supplier of commercial explosives and Australia’s largest manufacturer and supplier of fertilisers.

Responding to digital disruption

James provides a case study in management on how the company grew from a southern Australian fertiliser co-op to a global ASX 50 diversified industrial chemicals and fertiliser company over 14 years. Industrial chemicals and fertilisers are key inputs to soil health and nutritional needs, helping food producers maximise productivity and remain globally competitive. James elaborates on Incitec Pivot’s strategic journey and describes how his executive team drove a ‘gap to perfect’ strategy across the business – where any identified gaps (against international best practice) meet with goals and actions to improve daily performance.



This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics in the La Trobe Business School.

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:

© 2019 Business Newsroom

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑