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LBS Innovation Series: Is the Australian agricultural sector ready to grow?

The second presentation of the 2019 LBS Innovation Series by Joann Wilkie is on innovation and productivity growth in the Australian agricultural sector. Joann focus is on the aspirational target that the Australian agricultural sector has set itself for 2030 – that is, to reach $100 billion in gross value of production. Her presentation explores the challenges and opportunities this aspirational target implies for Australia’s primary producers.

About Joann

Joann is the First Assistant Secretary at Department of Agriculture and Water Resources. In her role, Joann is responsible for providing advice on a broad range of policy issues affecting the agriculture industry, overseeing the Research and Development Corporations and managing the R&D for profit program. She is an experienced public servant who has worked on a range of policy issues including energy, deregulation, women’s business taxation and economic policy.

Innovation

Joann explores the opportunities and challenges for continued innovation in the Australian agricultural sector relating to on-farm productivity, agtech and innovation, transport, regulations, competition, labour markets and workforce, industry structure and governance, and institutions. In addition, she discusses options for government and industry to better facilitate continuous innovation which is the major catalysts to meeting growing global demand.

Please enjoy Joann’s presentation.



This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School.

More blogs in the 2019 LBS Innovation Series:

LBS Innovation Series: Join experts in a discussion about the future of food production and agribusiness

How often do you get to hear from world leading robotics and autonomous systems, cereal biology, food quality and crop productivity, and nutrition, digestion and nutrient bioavailability experts talking about the implications of their research for the future of food production and agribusiness? Not very often is the short answer.

This is the opportunity being offered at the 2018 LBS/NORTHLink Innovation in Food and Agribusiness Forum at La Trobe University on the 15th and 16th of November.

Internationally recognised experts

There are presentations from Professor Peter Corke from Queensland University of Technology, Professor Harsharn Gill from RMIT University, and Professor Tony Bacic from La Trobe University, each internationally recognised experts in their field.

  • Professor Peter Corke is a distinguished professor of robotic vision at QUT, and Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Robotic Vision. His research is concerned with enabling robots to see, and the application of robots to mining, agriculture and environmental monitoring. Peter is a fellow of the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering, a fellow of the IEEE, founding and associate editor of the Journal of Field Robotics, founding multi-media editor and editorial board member of the International Journal of Robotics Research, member of the editorial advisory board of the Springer Tracts on Advanced Robotics series.
  • Professor Harsharn Gill is Head of the Food Research & Innovation Centre at RMIT University. He has over 25 years experience in leading and managing food, nutrition and health R&D in private and public sectors. Prior to joining RMIT, he held senior R&D leadership roles in Australia and New Zealand, including Research Director at the Department of Primary Industries Victoria; Chair of Functional Foods & Human Health at Massey University, and Director of Milk & Health Research Centre at Fonterra, New Zealand.
  • Professor Tony Bacic is Director of the La Trobe Institute for Agriculture & Food (LIAF). He is an internationally recognized leader in plant biotechnology, with research focused on the structure, function and biosynthesis of plant cell walls and their biotechnological application as well as the application of functional genomics tools in biological systems. Prior to joining La Trobe (1996 to 2017) Tony was Personal Chair in the School of BioSciences at the University of Melbourne and leader of the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls team (2011-2017). His other leadership roles include Director Bio21 Molecular Sciences & Biotechnology Institute, Chair ARC Biological Sciences and Biotechnology & LIEF (infrastructure) Panels and Chair Biological Sciences and Biotechnology Panel of the ERA (Excellence in Research Australia).

Besides these three, the forum presents many industry heavyweights as well such as Allan McCallum, Chair of Cann Group, James Fazzino, former CEO Incitec Pivot, and Andrea Koch from Principle Agtech.

Agricultural technology and science revolution

The agriculture industry is on the edge of a technology and science revolution and each of these outstanding individuals will share their research and discuss its application as a driver for the changing dynamics of the global food production and agribusiness.

However, more than a range of presentations, the 2018 LBS/NORTHLink Innovation in Food and Agribusiness Forum promotes two-way knowledge transfer and dialogue, interactive panels, case studies, opportunities for networking, masterclasses, and direct access to cutting edge science and technology experts.

 

Why not be part of this rare opportunity? You can learn more about the Forum and register by following this link:

www.latrobe.edu.au/events/all/innovation-in-food-and-agribusiness

 

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics in the La Trobe Business School. The series was developed after the successful National Innovation Forum organised by La Trobe Business School, NORTH Link and Deloitte Consulting P/L.

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:

LBS students analysing data for better health outcomes

It’s one success after another for our Department of Accounting and Data Analytics! Besides being ranked in the top 75 universities in the world with our Master of Business Analytics (2019 QS Masters Rankings),  data analytics students made a huge impact during the Bendigo Health Datathon.

Bendigo Health Datathon

The Bendigo Health Datathon was part of the Bendigo Invention & Innovation Festival and organised by Bendigo Health in collaboration with the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), La Trobe University, University of Wollongong, Be.Bendigo and Australian New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS).

Critical Care Recovery

The Datathon brought together teams of clinicians, statisticians, data scientists and administrators to understand and explore the use of secondary healthcare data for better health outcomes. The theme of the Datathon was Critical Care Recovery, with the aim of exploring the health and community outcomes for patients after their journey through the hospital setting.

The participants developed innovative solutions to real problems by applying data analytics and statistical techniques to never-before-combined disparate data sets. The data sets included were:

  • ANZICS Adult Patient Database (APD
  • Victorian Admitted Episodes Dataset (VAED)
  • Victorian Emergency Minimum Dataset (VEMD)
  • Home and Community Care Program (HACC)
  • Victorian Cancer Registry (VCR)
  • Victorian Death Index (VDI)
  • Victorian Integrated Non-Admitted Health (VINAH)
  • Australasian Rehabilitation Outcomes Register (AROC)

LBS success

The students worked in different teams and produced some amazing insights. Besides the opportunity for our students to work alongside clinicians, doctors and health researchers, two of them took out the first and second prize at the Datathon. Congratulations to Mahesh Krishnan and Kriti Chhabra!

 

Find out more about our Master of Business Analytics

LBS Innovation Series – Is Australia prepared?

Professor of Practice in economics at LBS, Dr Mark Cloney, asks: what are the key drivers of innovation, disruption and opportunity in the global food production and agribusiness sectors? And why have the Dutch got it so right?

Changing consumer demand, particularly in Asia, corporatisation of farming, automation on farms and in processing, agtech and advances in the Internet of Things (IoT), digitalisation of supply chains, agricultural science advances, and the emergence of vertical farming are just some of the drivers changing the dynamics of the global food production and agribusiness[1].

The Netherlands

Are Australia’s food producers and agribusiness well-informed and placed to understand these challenges and to gain from the opportunities they offer? Countries like The Netherlands certainly are[2]. Despite its relative size, the Dutch are the world’s second largest exporter of agricultural products at $158 billion, or three times Australia’s exports[3]. Together with the USA and Spain, The Netherlands is one of the world’s three leading producers of vegetables and fruit supplying a quarter of the vegetables that are exported from Europe. Why? The Dutch are forward-looking, highly innovative and collaborative and have achieved worldwide recognition for their research, infrastructure and innovation systems. For example, Wageningen University and Research (WUR) is the number 1 agricultural university in the world for the third year in a row according to The National Taiwan Ranking of over 300 universities; while, 5 of the top 26 global agri-food companies have R&D facilities in The Netherlands[4].

Australia

So where does Australia stand in comparison? Nationally, the food and agribusiness sector employed approximately 522,000 persons and there were approximately 178,500 businesses trading in the sector (as at June 2015). According to the Australian Government’s Industry Innovation and Competitiveness Agenda[5], food production and agribusiness are areas of competitive strength for Australia. Australia’s food and agribusiness sector includes food-related agricultural production, food processing and the major inputs to these activities. This includes: food products, processing and beverage manufacturing as well as key inputs; and, agribusiness that relates directly to food production and their supply chains.

La Trobe’s AgriBio Centre

La Trobe University has demonstrated a strong commitment to helping Australia create a vibrant future for those involved in the production of food, fibre and agribusiness. La Trobe plays its role in building human capital and undertaking R&D and scientific research that supports the food and agribusiness innovation system. For example, La Trobe’s AgriBio Centre brings together world-class research in the largest agricultural R&D organisation in Victoria. La Trobe recently announced funding of $50 million for its new La Trobe Institute for Agriculture and Food focused on solutions for global food security.  La Trobe is also a founding member and financial contributor to Melbourne’s Northern Food Group a partnership with the Victorian government, 5 local governments, 4 tertiary institutes, Yarra Valley Water, Melbourne Innovation Centre, and the Melbourne Market Authority among others.

LBS/NORTHLink Innovation in Food and Agribusiness Forum

So how can Australia’s food producers and agribusiness prepare themselves against ever increasing disruption, and better collaborate with world class researchers and scientists in this field? These are some of the questions being explored at the Innovation in Food and Agribusiness Forum organised by LBS in partnership with NORTHLink. The focus of the Forum is on hearing from industry speakers of successful innovation in the food production and agribusiness sector. It will present industry and government perspectives on how we can continue to improve innovation in this sector, particularly for SMEs and start-ups operating in a global context.

In particular, the Forum offers an opportunity to explore how we create the right collaborative partnerships and environment for food production and agribusiness to succeed globally in an era of increased disruption. Maybe we just need some Dutch courage!

 

References:

 

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics in the La Trobe Business School. The series was developed after the successful National Innovation Forum organised by La Trobe Business School, NORTH Link and Deloitte Consulting P/L.

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:

LBS Innovation Series: How do companies hold on to their ability to innovate?

This episode in the LBS Innovation Series shows Christine Axton, Director in Monitor Deloitte’s Strategy Practice. Her talk is about how companies hold on to their ability to innovate and how they achieve, and keep, an innovation premium in the market.

Innovator’s method

Christine presents a short overview of the business tool innovator’s method and illustrates its application in a case study. The innovator’s method is designed to help firms create and maintain an innovation premium, and more specifically to manage uncertainty in the innovation process. The approach seeks to manage uncertainty across the key end-to-end innovation process for start-ups i.e. insight; problem; solution; and, business model.

Testing uncertainty

Where innovator’s method differs from other tools such as lean start-up, design thinking, agile software, lean start-up and business canvas etc. is primarily regarding the steps of the innovation process they emphasise. The innovator’s method offers a set of tools and methods to consider and test uncertainty at each of the end-to-end innovation process steps. The power of this approach is to ensure start-ups don’t go to market wasting time and resources on things customers don’t want. Many start-ups make the mistake of leaping straight to solutions without first understanding the real problems and uncertainty associated with their product/service.

 

Watch Christine’s presentation below:

 

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics in the La Trobe Business School. The series was developed after the successful National Innovation Forum organised by La Trobe Business School, NORTH Link and Deloitte Consulting P/L.

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:

Students working together with industry on real-world issues

Every semester, students enrolled in LBS’ Master of Business Information Management and Systems (MBIMS) get the chance to work on live projects for the subject Business Intelligence Project Analysis and Design (BUS5BPD). This semester the students are undertaking a Digital Twin Inspection Tool project for the Australian Marine and Ship Services in collaboration with Deloitte.

What is digital twin technology?

A digital twin is a virtual model of a process, product or service. These ‘digital twins’ are applied to accelerate design, optimise performance and enable predictive maintenance. When delivered effectively, the results are improved product reliability, availability, safety and a reduction in the cost of delivery. Thus, a digital twin could be seen as a bridge between the physical and digital world.

Digital Twin Inspection Tool

Together with Deloitte, a fictional scenario is created; An Australian shipping company is having trouble aligning their digital twin to the physical asset, and they need an improved toolset to enhance their existing audit processes. Even though the Australian shipping company is a fictional company, the HMAS Castlemaine is used as a physical case study. The HMAS Castlemaine is one of the 60 Australian-built Bathurst Class corvettes to serve throughout World War II and is the last such vessel still afloat. The ship provides students with the opportunity to collect data and test their application. Ultimately, students are expected to capture/validate the physical state of the HMAS Castlemaine in a yet to be developed inspection application for Deloitte, compatible with Apple technology.

Students in front of the HMAS Castlemaine

Guest lectures by Deloitte and Apple

Throughout the semester, a series of guest lectures is provided by Deloitte and Apple. These guest lectures help students develop the digital twin inspection tool while using the philosophy of ‘Design Thinking’. Design Thinking is a design methodology that provides a solution-based approach to solving problems. Besides design thinking, these lectures also cover relevant topics such as the digital twins’ concept and designing the  inspection application architecture of digital twins.

Industry-University collaboration

This project is a great example of how university and industry can collaborate to provide students with the opportunity to apply the skills they learn throughout their degree in the real world. Besides developing an actual prototype, this project enhances students’ academic, career, and personal development, increases their understanding of the work place and makes them career ready.

LBS and Deloitte arranged a site visit to the HMAS Castlemaine to give students the opportunity to visualise the challenge.

LBS Innovation Series: University-industry collaboration and Intellectual Property

Dr. Ben Mitra-Kahn, Chief Economist at IP Australia, challenges the established view according to particular OECD statistics and rankings, that Australia is not very good at university-industry collaboration. This also runs contrary to the views of Innovation and Science Australia, the agency charged with developing a plan for Australia’s innovation prosperity through to 2030.

IP data

Ben’s argument is that the OECD’s understanding stands in contrast to the actual experience in Australia, for universities, industry and government when you examine joint patent application data. This IP data (patents, trademarks, design rights etc.) tells you what people are filing for rights protection and with whom they are partnering. This presentation focussed on presenting data from joint patent applications which is reported in the annual National Innovation Systems Report from the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science.

Why is this important?

Ben referenced research that shows firms that collaborate with research institutions are three times more likely to experience productivity growth. Ben argues when compared to universities internationally Australia’s performance compares very well with highly innovative and countries such as South Korea and Israel. Finally, Ben suggests the IP data demonstrates that joint patent applications between universities and industry are actually increasing in Australia.

 

Watch his presentation below:

 

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics in the La Trobe Business School. The series was developed after the successful National Innovation Forum organised by La Trobe Business School, NORTH Link and Deloitte Consulting P/L.

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:

LBS Innovation Series: An eco-system, satellites and stage

Nick Kaye is the founding Chief Executive Officer of the Sydney School of Entrepreneurship (SSE) and in this presentation he talks about setting up the SSE.

Platform

Nick argues that the SSE offers a model that can facilitate greater investment and collaboration across and between the higher education sector and industry. The role of SSE is to act as platform and honest broker for budding entrepreneurs within the 12 institutions it represents supporting Australia’s emerging innovators to pursue their entrepreneurial ambitions. Nick presented a case study of the development of the SSE which opened in August 2017.

Collaboration between universities & TAFE’s

The SSE is an unprecedented new partnership between 11 NSW Universities and TAFE NSW. It is based on the business model Nick successfully led for 10 years at the Stockholm School of Entrepreneurship. Some 35% of the Stockholm alumni are now highly active entrepreneurs and include new start-ups such as SoundCloud. When fully operational, at least 1,000 student entrepreneurs each year will participate in SSE courses and activities during their degree or TAFE program, with many more taking part in a program of co-curricular activities including workshops, hackathons, and educational boot camps and networking events.

 

Watch his presentation below:

 

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics in the La Trobe Business School. The series was developed after the successful National Innovation Forum organised by La Trobe Business School, NORTH Link and Deloitte Consulting P/L.

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:

International Conference of Organizational Innovation (2018 ICOI)

The 12th International Conference of Organizational Innovation (2018 ICOI), Asia’s prominent Management and Innovation Conference, was recently held in Fukuoka, Japan. The conference is co-sponsored by La Trobe Business School. Conference host, Fukuoka University, delivered an outstanding event with spectacular views from the top floor of the Business School Building. A highlight was the student drum session. The 2018 ICOI was the most successful conference to date, and LBS is proud to be the only Australian University associated with the conference.

International scholars from over two-dozen countries presented 239 papers associated to organizational innovation. Included were two papers from LBS’ graduate researchers Ana Amirsardari and Roula Tabbah, presented by their Research Supervisor, Professor Alex Maritz.  Seen below is the organising committee of the conference, (L-R) Dr Charles Shieh (Conference Chair), Professor Alex Maritz (VP, International Association of Organizational Innovation), Dr Frederick Dembowski (President, International Association of Organizational Innovation and Mr Aria Aulandri (Indonesian Chair).

Keynotes included dynamic presentations on Renewable Energy, Resource Constrained Innovation and Innovating Organizational Innovation, together with VIP speeches from prominent international scholars, including Professors Niklov, Hristova, Dass, Gunawa, Huang, Jen-der Day, Antanov, de Waal and Engelbert.

Our special appreciation to Professor Yamazaki Yoshhiro, Faculty of Economics, Fukuoka University, for hosting a successful 2018 ICOI. LBS and Fukuoka University have agreed to future research collaboration and student/staff engagement.

 

2018 ICOI

LBS Innovation Series: Melbourne Innovation Centre – A case study in innovation

The Melbourne Innovation Centre (MIC), has been operating for 19 years and has been self-funded since 1998. The organisation’s role is to teach, train, mentor and support entrepreneurs and start-ups in Melbourne’s northern region. The organisation has incubated over 400 start-up and scale-up businesses throughout this period, creating more than 1,500 new jobs within Melbourne’s north and contributing approximately $66 million to the national economy annually.

Melbourne’s innovation system

Mr David Williamson, CEO Melbourne Innovation Centre, outlines the current state of northern Melbourne’s innovation system in some detail and the key industry, tertiary, state and local government, and intermediary players that help to shape it. He discusses how MIC’s methodology to assist start-ups and entrepreneurs has changed rapidly over the last three years. That is, away from writing long business plans to lean methodologies (start-up science) that utilizes things like the business canvas, lean start-up, design thinking and prototyping and strategies for rapid deployment. He noted that during this time the typical age profile of his clients has become younger from predominantly 30 to 40-year olds to 20 to 30-year olds. David discusses recent changes to national legislation for venture capital and crowd funding similar to legislation in the UK and New Zealand. He believes this offers great opportunities and will have a dramatic impact on the availability for funding new ideas and innovation.

 

Watch his presentation below:

 

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics in the La Trobe Business School. The series was developed after the successful National Innovation Forum organised by La Trobe Business School, NORTH Link and Deloitte Consulting P/L.

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:

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