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Dalrymple bowls his way to Vicsport Award

Neil Darymple and LBS Associate Professor Emma Sherry

Neil Dalrymple, the latest recipient of the La Trobe Business School sponsored Vicsport Victorian Sport Administrator of the Year Award, has done exactly that.

Dalrymple’s passion for sport can be traced back to a childhood where his sporting endeavours as an up an avid cricketer, footballer and golfer took him abroad.

After years of playing, Dalrymple decided to jump ship and begin a career in sports administration in 1987.

“I’d been playing cricket overseas, mainly in England, for two winters and then I came back to Australia and got a job with the Australian Cricket Board (now Cricket Australia),” Dalrymple says.

From his first job at Cricket Australia, Dalrymple’s work over the next twelve years would see his hard-work and dedication spread over a number of organisations.

He worked as the CEO and National Development Officer at Softball Australia for eight years, was appointed CEO of Northern Territory Cricket in 2004 and worked in the role until 2006 before returning to Cricket Australia for a two-year period as the Community Cricket Manager.

It was in May of 2007 that Dalrymple moved into his current role as Bowls Australia CEO and after ten years at the helm, his commitment was rewarded with the La Trobe University sponsored VicSport accolade.

During his time in the top job, Dalrymple says the constant need to evolve has expanded his horizons.

“It’s definitely changed over my time. Certainly trying to create shorter versions of the game have been a real focus.”

“That need for change is based on a lot of evidence, similar to twenty-twenty cricket, because if you don’t adapt and shorten your sport and game format to something that can fit within the space of an hour or two then you are going to struggle to get new participants,” Dalrymple says.

This creative change, Dalrymple explains, is brought upon by the misconception around the age of people that play bowls.

“I think it’s (bowls) positioned as a sport for older people and that’s not necessarily a bad thing. There’s obviously a large number of older people that do play bowls but I think from a media perspective we can try and change that by making it a more attractive game to a younger audience.”

“Now that could be for 40-year-olds, 50-year-olds or 20-year-olds. The fact is that the average age of our Australian team now is about 30 so that alone is helping to change that outside perception.”

One shorter version of the game is the Australian Premier League and was introduced around four years ago with the competition broadcast to a live audience on Fox Sports. Dalrymple believes this media coverage is helping shift outsiders thinking of bowls.

Along with creating shorter versions of the game, a number of structural changes have taken place over Dalrymple’s time at the top with the replacement of state association development officers to regional bowls managers employed by the national body. This centralisation has in-turn allowed Bowls Australia to receive more funding from the Australia Sports Commission.

After years of hard work at the helm of Bowls Australia, Darlymple’s acknowledgement at the VicSport Awards was “thoroughly pleasing”.

Neil is currently exploring study and professional development opportunities with the La Trobe Business School for himself and his staff using the scholarship money offered with the award.

“Given I was a finalist I thought I was a reasonable chance and I felt that I’d had a good year and it was also great recognition for not just the last 12 months but for the contribution I’d made over a number of years.”

With over 20 years of experience within the sports industry, Dalrymple’s advice to anyone wanting to follow a similar path is to come in with the right attitude.

“A strong work ethic is important. A lot of people want to get somewhere quickly but I think sometimes you have to put in the hard yards so you’ve really got to enjoy what you do.”

“For students, I think the most important thing is to get voluntary experience. Get into organisations and offer your services because building your resume is very important as that experience shows you’ve done the hard yards and in turn good opportunities will come to you.”

La Trobe Business School partners for Sport Development and Peace

Dr Emma Sherry

LBS Associate Professor Emma Sherry recently participated in the inaugural symposium on Sport for Development and Peace, hosted by the University of Illinois as an invited speaker and Town Hall panelist. The symposium, titled Forming Partnerships and Linkages in Sport for Development and Peace: Considerations, Tensions, and Strategies, brought together international academics and sport for development experts and practitioners to discuss how sport, specifically through the creation and nurturing of key partnerships, can be used to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

The purpose of the symposium was to bring together scholars, practitioners and students engaged in sport for development and peace (SDP) to create a dialogue about forming and sustaining partnerships and linkages between SDP initiatives and other sectors, the challenges facing partnership development, and strategies to overcome these challenges. The symposium was hosted by the Department of Recreation, Sport, and Tourism (RST) at the University of Illinois, the Sport+Development Lab (SDL), and Play for Change. The SDL is home to faculty and graduate students researching the intersection of sport and development. Play for Change is a registered student organization (RSO) focused on involving undergraduate and graduate students in actionable projects that use sport, recreation, and tourism for social change.

The sport for development and peace (SDP) field has grown exponentially in recent years, with more and more organizations, practitioners, and academics around the world embracing the possible contribution that sport can make to development agendas. SDP can occur at the individual, community, and societal levels. It can be defined as the use of sport as an engine for development through intercultural exchange, conflict resolution and peace building, community building, social inclusion, or programming for interpersonal development or health.

An emerging line of commentary in SDP concerns the nature of partnerships with various industry sectors. Without effective and sustainable partnerships, SDP organizations and scholars cannot viably engage in the field to effect social change; partnerships are the life blood of SDP organizations. However, many challenges and barriers exist that inhibit effective partnerships and linkages. From overcoming power dynamics, to misaligned goals and objectives, challenges can prevent organizations from establishing long-term partnerships and carrying out their missions. Given the international significance of partnerships and collaborations in SDP, much more conversation is needed about the nature of partnerships, their challenges, and effective strategies for forming and sustaining them.

The symposium brought together SDP experts, including Dr Sherry, to share presentations drawing on an original paper written for this symposium. Presenters provided a state of the field synopsis regarding partnerships with a specific sector (for example, health, community organisations, education or national and international bodies), outline challenges for developing and sustaining them, and then propose strategies for addressing these challenges.

In addition to the symposium, there were also two evening public events. On the first night, Dr. John Sugden, one of the world’s foremost experts in SDP and partnership development, provided a keynote address on the history and development of SDP, its current state of the field, and thoughts on developing and sustaining partnerships and linkages. The second night featured a town hall meeting with the symposium presenters focused on the power of sport to work for social good and change, and the challenges associated with doing so.

Dr Sherry noted that although the two-day symposium provided a full schedule for all attendees, the opportunity for international scholars in this field to spend time together to deeply discuss key research, theory-building and opportunities for research collaboration was invaluable. The opportunity for networking and discussion was extended through a very active use of Twitter by those organizing and attending (#sport4change2017) which extended the reach of the symposium to those unable to attend in person. Dr Sherry hopes that this is the first of many such events, and was delighted to be invited to present and share her research in the SDP field.

LBS Sport Management students hit goals at International Festival of Hockey

By Emma Sherry

La Trobe University is proud to be the number one University for sport in Australia. Two key undergraduate programs within the La Trobe sport course offerings are delivered by LBS, and are the Bachelor of Business (Sport Management) at our Melbourne campus and the Bachelor of Business (Sport Development and Management) at our Bendigo campus.  A third key program, at the postgraduate level and delivered by LBS, is the Master of Management (Sport Management).

Sport is a rapidly growing and significant global industry offering a range of career opportunities. Our degrees are designed and delivered in collaboration with industry professionals. These courses combine business foundations with essential sport-specific knowledge and skills. We offer valuable placement and network opportunities and exposure to potential areas of employment.

In the undergraduate degrees, in addition to work integrated learning experiences through our Sport Practicum subject, sport management students at both campuses are provided with opportunities to volunteer at a variety of sport and active recreation events and activities during their time as a student. Students have volunteered at Melbourne City, Melbourne Rebels and most recently with Hockey Australia for the International Festival of Hockey. Students are required to apply formally for these opportunities and through this process develop their CV writing and interview experience. This process also ensures that the sport organisations receive the very best student candidates for these valuable volunteer placements.

Two students, Tianna (Bendigo) and Sam (Bundoora) (pictured above) have been volunteering with Hockey Australia this year, culminating in the festival held in Bendigo on November 19th. Ben Hartung, the General Manager – Hockey, noted that “Sam and Tianna, our two brilliant interns, are working at the International Festival of Hockey … They are both playing keys roles in the organisation of the Festival components in Melbourne and Bendigo and they have been embraced by the entire Hockey Australia team. We are very lucky to have them as part of our team”.

The International Festival of Hockey is a fun-filled family event that saw Australia’s home favourites, the iconic Kookaburras and Hockeyroos, take on some of their biggest international rivals, India, Malaysia and New Zealand. Hot off the back of their Olympic Games campaign, the Australian men’s team – the Kookaburras – host India, Malaysia and New Zealand in a four nations competition in Melbourne before taking on India in two further test matches in Bendigo. Also playing in Australia for the first time since the Olympics, the Hockeyroos – the women’s team – go head-to-head against India in three test matches in Melbourne.

The sport management programs at La Trobe University pride ourselves on creating engaged and work-ready graduates. By providing more opportunities for students, outside of their formal education, the program ensure that our students are best placed to build their CV during their time with us and to gain employment on completion of their studies.

 

Olympics Explainer: intersex athletes at the Rio 2016 Games

Emma Sherry

By Emma Sherry

In the lead-up to the 800m women’s final at the recent Rio Olympic Games, much of the lead up discussion focused on the South African athlete Caster Semenya. The history of sex verification in sport has been long and for many traumatic, with international sport organisations policing women with “masculine” features, subjecting them to a barrage of blood test, scans and physical examinations. However in sport, the traditional gender binary of male and female has been challenged and the right of intersex athletes to compete on the world stage has now been established by the Court of Arbitration of Sport.

What is intersex? “Intersex” is a general term used for a variety of conditions in which a person is born with a reproductive or sexual anatomy that doesn’t seem to fit the typical definitions of female or male. Differences may be found in anatomy or genetics, however intersex anatomy doesn’t always show up at birth. Sometimes a person isn’t found to have intersex anatomy until she or he reaches the age of puberty, or finds himself an infertile adult, or dies of old age and is autopsied. Some people live and die with intersex anatomy without anyone (including themselves) ever knowing (Source: www.isna.org)


Caster Semenya’s case, and those of other athletes such as India’s Dutee Chand has been strongly fought over a number of years, with the international governing body of athletics (IAAF) and the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The primary source of disagreement between the athletes, genetic and endocrine specialists, and the sport organisations is the inability for the science to draw a “line in the sand” between a male and female athlete.

In July 2015, the Court of Arbitration for Sport found that the IAAF policy regarding levels of testosterone in female athletes was not justified, noting: “While the evidence indicates that higher levels of naturally occurring testosterone may increase athletic performance, the Panel is not satisfied that the degree of that advantage is more significant than the advantage derived from the numerous other variables which the parties acknowledge also affect female athletic performance: for example, nutrition, access to specialist training facilities and coaching and other genetic and biological variations.”. The decision of the court ordered that the rules to be shelved until the IAAF could provide further evidence that could show there was a clear difference between male and female testosterone levels, and how big an advantage the extra testosterone gave hyperandrogenic women. This decision subsequently saw the IOC also change its gender policy, noting that it would not regulate women’s natural testosterone levels until the issue is resolved via further scientific research.

These athletes, many of who for the first time discover their gender differences via competition testing, are under substantial pressure and criticism during the Games, with Semenya reportedly under armed guard in the Olympic Village following fears for her safety. This criticism from fans and competitors has however rallied support from her country people, with South African’s rallying to defend their athletics star.

She did exceptionally well in the final, and won gold. But regardless of the result, she will forever remembered at these games for her bravery and strength in continuing to compete in a sport that she loves against all odds.

Rio 2016 Olympics Explainer: what is Team Refugee?

RefugeeTeam

by Emma Sherry

The Rio 2016 Olympic Games will see the inclusion of the first Team of Refugee Olympic Athletes. In March this year, the Executive Board of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) created a team of Refugee Olympic Athletes. This team will be treated at the Olympic Games like all the other teams of the 206 National Olympic Committees (NOCs).

Athletes competing at the Olympic Games (both summer and winter events) must be affiliated with their National Olympic Committee (NOC). However there have been times in recent history where nations have been dissolved or new nations have emerged due to political transition, or international sanctions have left athletes without a formal nation or NOC. These athletes have traditionally competed as Independent Olympic Athletes.

 Team Refugee will be treated like any other national team, with the same rights and responsibilities. For all official representations of the team, including any medal ceremonies, the Olympic flag will be raised and the Olympic Anthem will be played and the team marches behind the Olympic flag before host team Brazil at the Opening Ceremony.

Olympic Solidarity is covering all travel and other participation expenses for the team and will continue to support the athletes of the team after the Olympic Games.

Ten athletes have been selected by the International Olympic Committee to participate in the 2016 Olympic Games Team Refugee, with each being hosted by another National Olympic Committee (NOC). The athletes are:

  • Rami Anis (M): Country of origin – Syria; sport – swimming
  • Yiech Pur Biel (M): Country of origin – South Sudan; sport – athletics, 800m
  • James Nyang Chiengjiek (M): Country of origin – South Sudan; sport – athletics, 400m
  • Yonas Kinde (M): Country of origin – Ethiopia; sport – athletics, marathon
  • Anjelina Nada Lohalith (F): Country of origin – South Sudan; sport – athletics, 1500m
  • Rose Nathike Lokonyen (F): Country of origin – South Sudan; sport – athletics, 800m
  • Paulo Amotun Lokoro (M): Country of origin – South Sudan; sport – athletics, 1500m
  • Yolande Bukasa Mabika (F): Country of origin – Democratic Republic of the Congo; sport – judo, -70kg
  • Yusra Mardini (F): Country of origin – Syria; sport – swimming
  • Popole Misenga (M): Country of origin – Democratic Republic of the Congo; sport – judo, -90kg

The United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) stated that “their athletic prowess and resilience is a tribute to the courage and perseverance of all refugees – at a time when the number of people displaced by violence and persecution is at the highest level since the Second World War”. Indeed, growing support for Team Refugee across the globe is being realised via awareness campaigns and messages of support.

As the world around us witnesses the growing displacement of entire communities due to war, conflict and the growing spread of terrorism; it is heartening to know that these elite athletes, including those without a nation, have the opportunity to take their place at the Olympic Games.

 Want to show your support for the Refugee Olympic Team? Find out how here.

The Centre for Sport and Social Impact secured a $190,000 contract with the Australian Sports Commission

AIS

The Centre for Sport and Social Impact has secured a $190,000 contract with the Australian Sports Commission, to assess the efficacy of its Sporting Schools program. This program has been operating in primary schools and is now being extended in an Australia-wide pilot to secondary schools. The team at CSSI will be working with 8 national sport organisations and 80 secondary schools, investigating the barriers and facilitators to students engaging in greater sport participation, from now until the middle of 2017. In conjunction with the $800,000 contract that the CSSI holds with VicHealth to investigate State Sport Association programs that encourage inactive and somewhat active Victorians to participate in more sport and physical activity, this new project provides the CSSI with exposure to Australia’s peak sport agency and access to a diverse range of sport organisations working to develop and implement modified sport programs and products.

A multi-disciplinary and cross-College team will be leading this project: The team is comprised of Dr Matthew Nicholson, Dr Erica Randle, Dr Emma Sherry, Dr Paul O’Halloran, Dr Arthur Stukas and Ms Pam Kappelides – 4 staff from the La Trobe Business School and 2 staff from the School of Psychology and Public Health.

Congratulations to our amazing La Trobe Business School academics!

Leading La Trobe researchers comment on ongoing impacts of Essendon case

HH
On the evening of 21 March 2016, Professor Patrick Keyzer appeared on the ABC’s Four Corners, to comment on 22 year-old Hal Hunter’s case against Essendon Football Club.  Hunter played at Essendon during the now notorious Essendon supplements scandal.  Patrick Keyzer is a Professor of Law at La Trobe University, but is representing Hal Hunter in his private capacity as a barrister.

Hal Hunter played for Essendon for two years before being de-listed in 2013. After his parents’ attempts to get information from the club were ignored, Hal decided to seek pre-litigation disclosure from Essendon and the AFL.  After eighteen months of delays Hal got his day in court in October last year.  The Supreme Court ordered the AFL to produce over one hundred documents for Hal and his legal and medical team to consider.  The Supreme Court did not order Essendon to produce any documents because, the day before the hearing, Essendon’s lawyer swore an affidavit that Essendon had told him that they had provided all of the relevant documents they had.  Notwithstanding their representations to the Court, which they relied on successfully when they sought a costs order against Hunter in February, Essendon sent further documents to Hunter just last week.  Keyzer was reported on 3AW Radio yesterday and advised that if Essendon did not agree to a reversal of the costs order that Hunter would have no choice but to return to Court and point out to the judge that the affidavit sworn by Essendon’s lawyer in October was no longer accurate.

“They’re treating it like an issue that will just go away,” Hal Hunter said on Four Corners, “but for me, if I’m not going to get the answers to the questions I’m asking, it’s never going to go away.”

Through the program, Essendon players were injected with unknown substances repeatedly, sometimes on off-site locations. When asked about the risks of these substances Dr Peter Brukner OAM, who is a specialist sports and exercise physician, media commentator, and Honorary Professor of Sports Medicine at La Trobe University, explains that the risk lies in the fact that they are unregistered:

“What people sometimes don’t realise is that the Essendon scandal doesn’t revolve around supplements, but actual unregistered drugs. This means that these drugs aren’t tested and long-term effects or harmful side-effects are largely unknown. To someone like Hal Hunter, the unknown nature of these drugs is understandably distressful, and Essendon should do anything within its power to provide this clarity to its players.”

LBS sports academic, Dr Emma Sherry, whose research focusses on sports and athlete welfare and sport and the community, is happy to see the narrative of the Essendon trial shift to the health of individual players.

“Often in instances of doping, the focus is on the fact that athletes were cheating, rather than the health risk any unregistered drugs may impose. But for these 34 players, their sense of control has been taken away from them, when it comes to their health. When they get sick in the future, they will never be certain whether this development is a long-term side-effect from this unregistered drug, or whether it would’ve happened regardless. Basically, they have been exposed to a human clinical trial, without giving their consent.”

 

Emma Sherry plays key role in developing more inclusive sport in South Australia

Emma Sherry

Last month, Dr Emma Sherry from the Centre for Sport and Social Impact was invited by the South Australian Office of Sport and Recreation to provide strategic advice and a keynote presentation on the topic of sport and inclusion.

During the day with the ORS team, Emma delivered an internal professional development session to ORS staff regarding the research context in Australia and the Pacific on developing more inclusive and diverse sport organisations. The key message of this session was to provide insights that the team can apply to increasing opportunities for the South Australian community to participate in sport at all levels and a wide variety of roles.

Following the ORS staff workshop, Emma delivered a keynote and interactive session with a group of 30 CEOs and senior managers from South Australian state sporting organisations. This session was supported by the CEO of Inclusive Sport SA, and together with the ORS executive this session was provided as a joint initiative and to build on the momentum of Inclusive Sport SA’s Building an Inclusive Culture Forum and three Empowering Sport to Reflect Community Round Tables held earlier in the year.

Emma’s keynote and workshop discussed:

  • insight into current research and results that could influence SSO decision making
  • opportunity to examine how SSOs engage in diversity and inclusion, strategically and operationally (and what is the difference between the two)
  • sports to be aware of the benefits to them of embracing all aspects of their sport and all potential participants and pathways
  • sport understanding of the value and role of good news stories and the potential to get buy in from other partners
  • understanding that inclusion is core business and a strategic imperative and
  • to encourage collaboration and thought leadership between sport organisations.Key learnings from this workshop will be used by the South Australian SSOs to prepare for a new South Australian government funding initiative Sport and Recreation Development and Inclusion Program which will deliver over $3 million to sport organisations for projects up to 3 years in duration. Emma and the team at the Centre for Sport and Social Impact are liaising with ORS to collaborate in monitoring and evaluation for this funding program to assess the impact of this policy on the diversity and inclusion practices of state sport organisations.

Key learnings from this workshop will be used by the South Australian SSOs to prepare for a new South Australian government funding initiative Sport and Recreation Development and Inclusion Program which will deliver over $3 million to sport organisations for projects up to 3 years in duration. Emma and the team at the Centre for Sport and Social Impact are liaising with ORS to collaborate in monitoring and evaluation for this funding program to assess the impact of this policy on the diversity and inclusion practices of state sport organisations.

La Trobe Business School experts change lives in Papua New Guinea

Emma Sherry La Trobe Business School Papua New Guinea

The NRL-run League Bilong Laif (League for Life) program in Papua New Guinea is positively changing the lives of participants, according to an evaluation by the Centre for Sport and Social Impact at La Trobe University.

Experts from La Trobe recently returned from a visit to PNG to assess the impact of League Bilong Laif, a sport-for-development program that runs in schools and promotes messages about respect and the importance of education for all Papua New Guineans. The program is funded by the Australian government and delivered by a team of Papua New Guinean NRL staff in four regions.

“We are starting to see that League Bilong Laif is more than just a schools program and can impact change for females, males and people with disabilities of all ages and in all regions”

“We are starting to see that League Bilong Laif is more than just a schools program and can impact change for females, males and people with disabilities of all ages and in all regions” says NRL Pacific Program Manager John Wilson, who travelled with the La Trobe review team to Port Moresby, Eastern Highlands Province, East New Britain Province, and the Autonomous Region of Bougainville.

“The NRL PNG team under the management of Mark Mom are doing a great job. We are building awareness that rugby league is not just a sport through delivering our positive education and respect messages in each community that will ultimately define the future of the program. The team is also delivering the program in sign language to make it more accessible” said Mr Wilson.

In addition, research found that participating in the League Bilong Laif program provides children with an opportunity to engage with education in a meaningful way, and that the program reinforces the message of gender equality through female NRL PNG staff, who are seen as role models and strong women.

Reflecting on his visit, Mr Wilson said PNG was full of great people that were looking for ways to contribute to their communities for a better tomorrow. “League Bilong Laif is a great platform for our staff to give back. In each region that we visited, the staff presented new opportunities for me to explore the cultural and logistical differences that affect the programs we deliver every day,” he said.

The research has found that the impact of the program extends beyond participating children, with preliminary findings suggesting positive change for program staff and broader communities, through partnerships with PNG and international charities, and community outreach programs.

Education specialists have been involved from the initial stages to establish and review the LBL program to ensure quality delivery of the program with desired outcomes. Review team member and sports management specialist Dr. Emma Sherry said they monitor education and gender equality outcomes through surveys and interviews with teachers and NRL PNG staff, stories of change with children, and via in-depth in-country interviews with program funders and key stakeholders.  By utilising these tools, the review team has sought to identify changes in attitude, behaviour and the impact of these on the participants, their school and community.

Dr. Sherry stated that the LBL program had grown exponentially since its inception three years ago, and the success of employing full-time staff, reaching out to dozens of schools, hundreds of teachers and many thousands of children is a testament to the dedication and expertise of the staff in both PNG and Australia.

“During the pilot phase, the program had been refined and is now being replicated across the Pacific [Fiji, Samoa and Tonga] as an example of how to actively engage children and their communities in education” she said.

League Bilong Laif is managed through a three-way partnership between the Australian Government, the PNG Government (represented by the National Department of Education) and the NRL. The program is supported by the Autonomous Bougainville Government Department of Education, the PNG Rugby Football League (PNGRFL), the University of PNG and the PNG National Sports Institute.

This article awas originally published on NRL.com

‘A Leg up to Well-Being’: Hannah MacDougall runner up in La Trobe’s 3MT competition!

In the 2015 finals of La Trobe’s 3MT competition, Hannah MacDougall presented her PhD research as one of the finalists, and did exceptionally well in finishing as runner up. Hannah is undertaking her PhD in Sport Management in the Department of Management and Marketing in LBS, and is supervised by Dr Emma Sherry, Professor Nora Shields and Dr Paul O’Halloran.

Hannah’s PhD, which she is currently completing by publication, focuses on the topic of Athlete Well-Being. The first stage of her PhD was a systematic review that compared the well-being of Australian Para and Olympic Sport athletes. Meta-analyses revealed that Para athletes, compared with Olympic sport athletes, had lower levels of self-acceptance, indicated by athletic identity, and body-image perceptions, and differed from Olympic sport athletes in terms of their motivation, indicated by a greater mastery-oriented climate. The review also indicated a need to establish the well-being of Para and Olympic sport athletes using valid and reliable measures of well-being, as well as determine what well-being means in the Para sport context.

The second stage of Hannah‘s PhD investigated the well-being needs and strengths of Para athletes in a global and sport-specific context.  The qualitative study found that the well-being needs and strengths of Para athletes differed across gender, sport, level of competition, and nature of impairment. Well-being needs were an interaction between physical pain, emotional regulation, lacking purpose outside of sport, and a lack of self-acceptance, especially for athletes with acquired impairments. Well-being strengths were perceived to increase as athletes increased their level of competition, and included personal growth, optimism, strong social support networks, and contributing to multiple communities.

The third stage will establish the well-being levels of Para and Olympic Sport athletes, and determine if there are any significant differences between these two groups as well as significant differences between congenital and acquired Para athletes. The quantitative study was conducted through an online survey and had 309 participants. Hannah is currently in the process of analysing her data.

The fourth and final stage of her PhD will be a targeted well-being RCT for Para athletes. The RCT will be 8 x 1hr individual face-to-face sessions and focus on training attentional focus and strengthening the brain muscle of athletes. The RCT will be conducted from November 2015 – February 2016. Watch her three-minute pitch of this thesis above.

The La Trobe 3MT final was held on the 2nd of September in the John Scott Meeting House and saw 8 finalists battle it out for the right to represent La Trobe at the 3MT Tran-Tasman final held in October in Queensland. The level of competition between candidates saw extremely high quality presentations and topics range from vocal health for Aussie Basketball coaches to ‘Avoiding Robots’. With great prizes up for grabs, the people’s choice and overall winner of the La Trobe 3MT thesis went to Jen Wiltshire with her presentation on ‘Why I love dirt’.

3MT® is a research-communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ). The exercise challenges PhD candidates to present a compelling oration on their thesis topic and its significance in just three minutes. 3MT® develops academic, presentation, and research-communication skills and supports the development of research students’ capacity to effectively explain their research in language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.

La Trobe Business School would like to congratulate Hannah for her great presentation in the 3MT finals!

Emma Sherry Hannah MacDougall 3MT Finalist from La Trobe Business School a leg up to well-being

Hannah MacDougall 3MT Finalist from La Trobe Business School a leg up to well-being

 

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