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La Trobe Business School

Category: News (page 2 of 11)

Highered helps LBS students, graduates and alumni get hired

La Trobe Business School is a member of the European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD), a global accreditation network of 488 top business and management schools. The La Trobe MBA and the Bachelor of Business (Tourism and Hospitality) are both accredited by EFMD through the prestigious EFMD Programme Accreditation System (EPAS).  The EFMD network has a Global Career Service called Highered, only offered to member schools,which provides a platform on which organisations can post employment, trainee and internship positions for students, graduates and alumni.

 

Only those studying at or who have graduated from an EFMD member institution have access. All La Trobe students and graduates can now take advantage of the LBS school accreditation and join others within the EFMD network, linking with employment and internship organisations around the world.

 

Globally there are more than 50,000 students using Highered-EFMD Global Career Services, with approximately 1,500 new members joining each week. Just in the last three months, there have been more than 100,000 views of positions at over 100 companies.

 

 

How does it work?

Once an account is made, you can login to your personal homepage to find internship, trainee positions, and graduate positions that are relevant to you from companies around the world.

 

Online assessment

There is also the opportunity to complete a complimentary online assessment, focused on work-related behaviour, numerical reasoning, verbal reasoning, and motivation. This is a useful tool as there is an increase in corporations using online assessment solutions in their hiring practices. The online assessment can help to prepare for interviews and thereby gain a competitive advantage in the recruitment process. The resulting report is for personal use and is not shared with or accessible by companies or La Trobe Business School. The tests are delivered by cut-e, the world leader in online assessment, and are only accessed via your personal account.

 

Join today to get Highered!

MBA becoming a pre-requisite for career advancement

La Trobe alumnus Marcus Guthrie completed his Master of Business Administration (MBA) in late 2015, studying night classes while working full-time. He’s now the CEO of Mildura Health Private Hospital, where he oversees 130 staff, three theatres, 29 in-patients beds, a day procedure unit and an oncology unit. Guthrie shares his insights on why you need an MBA to progress your career, and the benefits of studying at a regional Victorian campus.

 

La Trobe alumnus Marcus Guthrie, CEO of Mildura Health Private Hospital

From the hotel business to CEO of Mildura Health Private Hospital

I’ve been in management roles since 2000, albeit in a different career, as a director in luxury hotels around the world. My career path was from the Whitsundays, through the Caribbean, to the Seychelles and in the Maldives. There I was tasked with converting two islands from three star to five star. We mobilised 750 multinational staff and the project was quite successful. Along the way I had a family developing, so we decided to come home to Mildura. Initially, I was appointed General Manager of the Mildura Golf Resort. Then, I was awarded a position as Business Manager at the Mildura Base Hospital. That progressed to Patient Services Manager, looking after four departments and around 100 staff. And then Medical Administration Manager, taking care of all the senior specialists in the hospital, as well as Ramsay Healthcare Specialist clinic. In late 2017, I became the CEO of Mildura Health Private Hospital. As I was progressing in the healthcare industry, I realised I needed an MBA for three reasons. The first was the learning and growth opportunity; the second reason was that it’s really becoming a prerequisite to have an MBA on your file; and thirdly, largely, for career advancement. An MBA is fast becoming a prerequisite for career advancement.

 

Doing an MBA

Starting an MBA offers a fantastic learning and growth opportunity and a network of professional friendships. A lot of businesses require their middle to upper management cohort to have an MBA, for the value it brings to an organisation.

First, it cements the management fundamentals that you already know. What I found interesting was that management fundamentals haven’t really changed since the 1700 and 1800s, so it’s about learning to apply those theories to your everyday practice. It’s a good opportunity to reflect on those management fundamentals and prune them to suit the current business landscape. Second, there’s a large focus on sustainability and responsible, ethical leadership. I really enjoyed that aspect of the MBA – it ensured that I was on the right path within the work environment.

What I enjoyed the most was the networking. When I started my MBA there were 66 people in my cohort, many of whom I still keep in contact with – they’re from all different industries around Victoria and Australia. I learnt about their careers, about their professional challenges and professional opportunities, and the ideas they are trying to implement in their own careers. That was a really rich learning experience for me. Marcus was also drawn to the La Trobe MBA’s flexibility: “I could spend time with my family, handle my work commitments, but also have class time.”

 

La Trobe’s Mildura campus

La Trobe’s campus in Mildura was a significant factor for me starting my MBA, because I could complete the MBA from my home base. My job was really busy, but so was my personal life. We have three very young children, so I needed to support to my wife and children at home. At the time I spoke at length with the MBA Director and it was quite clear that the La Trobe MBA was a great opportunity for me. I could spend time with my family, handle my work commitments, but also have class time. There was great flexibility.

I was able to complete work, race home to see the family and then go to La Trobe to study one or two nights a week, from 6–9pm. I really enjoyed the night classes because they suited my lifestyle – they didn’t affect my work schedule. As well as that, there was the option of intensives from Fridays through to Mondays. You could pick various intensives on your calendar throughout the year and take off a significant amount of study time by doing that. And if I wanted to travel to Melbourne or the other regional campuses to complete my studies, I could.

 

Clear vision

My vision was to become CEO of this hospital one day. It still feels quite strange to have achieved my goal, although I’ve had a really clear vision for five or six years now. I remember saying to one of the Board members five years ago that, ‘Ultimately this is where I see myself and this is where I’d like to be’. It’s good to have a clear vision, but there’s a lot of hard work and also an element of luck involved – quite easily I could have gone in another direction. So that’s been a bizarre realisation, that I’ve actually got here – all the while knowing that the hard work has only just started.

There are many service moments in a patient’s journey that can have a positive effect on their overall care, says Mildura Health Private Hospital CEO Marcus Guthrie. You can draw a lot of parallels between hospitality and hospitals. Patient treatment should be viewed holistically, inclusive of all interactions a patient has throughout their journey of care. We look at a patient’s journey through a hospital as opportunities to care, and our interactions with family and friends of the patient are important contributions in the journey of care. It’s not just about treating the patient and the patient gets better, it’s also about the other contributions along the way: the quality of food and the friendliness of staff that deliver the food, the cleanliness of the hospital, or saying hello to a family member as you pass in the corridor. There are a significant amount of service moments in a patient’s journey that can have a positive effect on the overall care of the patient.

My vision for Mildura Private Hospital has always been to provide safe, quality healthcare. If the management team and I continue to have that goal, then I’m sure we’ll be very successful. The hospital’s a fantastic resource for Mildura. We service 70 per cent of Mildura Health Fund members and we also service a catchment area of Broken Hill, Renmark and Robinvale. It’s a really important hospital for the local community, especially because we’re co-located with the Mildura Base Hospital. There’s plans for expansion in the future, which will benefit the local community and members. Hopefully in the future, both hospitals can work together even further to improve service to the community.

 

Marcus Guthrie graduating from his MBA at La Trobe in 2015

 

I talk to people about La Trobe’s MBA all the time because I really believe in it. Don’t be worried about the workload. You should treat it similar to a sport, where you have to train two nights a week and then you generally have one day on the weekend that you’re committing to that sport. If you can commit that as the bare minimum, you should be able to navigate through an MBA quite easily.

 

This blog post was originally published on NEST. Read the original article.

Take home lessons from the ball tampering scandal

The ball tampering scandal is both simple and complex.  Simple in its conception and implementation. Complex in terms of its repercussions.

 

Ignominy.  Public shame or disgrace. That’s what I felt last week.  I was asked by ABC radio to comment on the suggestion that Australia needed to look to the New Zealand cricket team for guidance about how to develop a team culture that also embraced sportsmanship.  I lived in New Zealand from 2004 to January 2018.  For fourteen years, I had relied on the Australian Cricket team to mask the horrors of only two Rugby test match wins against New Zealand during my time in New Zealand. I was an expert in turning any conversation about New Zealand’s dominance of Australian rugby into a conversation about cricket.  The Australian Cricket team had been my cultural defence. On some days, it was my cultural attack.  My bouncer! And now I was acknowledging that “Maybe yes, the Australian Cricket team should look towards New Zealand for some inspiration and guidance”.  I should have added that the Cricket Australia hierarchy could contact any junior cricket coach should they be unsure about what is right or wrong in the context of a game of cricket. I am blaming the ignominy for being so forgetful.

 

Two weeks on, two issues stand out for me.

Ten seconds. Maybe less. That is about all it took for Australian Cricket captain to process the information in front of him and fail to intervene. The rest, as they say, is history. In uttering the words “I don’t want to know about it”, Steve Smith committed a leadership faux pas of some magnitude. Taking no action is an action.  His silence provided tacit approval.  Or more eloquently, “the only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” Edmund Burke, the 18th century Irish political philosopher seemed to know more about 21st century Australian cricket than what he could have ever imagined. The take home lessons are: 1) The phrase “Hang on a second…” might be one the most useful phrases for the ethical leader, 2) Ethics are not just 24-7; ethics are also 60-60, as in minutes and seconds. Ten seconds. Maybe less.

 

The sanctions meted out to the “Cape Town Three” (i.e. Smith, Warner and Bancroft) are different from what have been handed to other miscreant players.  There is no better example than Faf De Plessis. Twice sanctioned for ball tampering, he has not been forced to miss a single game of cricket. One month after his second transgression, he was made captain of the South African cricket team. One tenet of natural justice is that the punishment must fit the crime. My argument here is not whether the punishment does or does not fit the crime. My argument is that the 9-month and 12-month suspensions are demonstrably different from that applied to other cricketers found guilty of the same rules violation.  Take home lesson is that there is natural justice and then there is cricket justice. And cricket justice is not concerned with benchmarking.

 

Ten seconds and sanctions without precedent. It’s just not cricket… as we knew it.

 

 

This blog is written by Dr Geoff Dickson, Associate Professor within the Department of Management Sport and Tourism. His teaching and research interests include governance, interorganisational networks, leadership, strategy, risk and law in the sport industry. 

Meet the new Head of Department of Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Marketing

Simon Pervan is the new Head of the Department of Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Marketing (EIM) in LBS.  Business Newsroom sat down with him to ask him some questions about who he is, what made him come to La Trobe and other interesting facts about him.

 

Head of EIM Department: Professor Simon Pervan

 

Welcome to the La Trobe Business School Simon! Where do you come from and what brings you to La Trobe University? And could you tell a bit more about your history with La Trobe University?

My most recent university was Swinburne where I was Head of Department of Management and Marketing. Previous to that I have worked in many places including Deakin here in Vic, Southern Cross University in Northern NSW, Auckland University of Technology in NZ and the University of Bath in the UK. My history with La Trobe dates back to 1997 as an Associate Lecturer! While here, I did my PhD at Uni Melb and then left for Deakin in 2002. So it has been 15 years since I have worked here. I had been waiting for the DWB upgrade!

 

How will you be approaching your new role as Head of Department?

I think it is important as a Head of Department to be available to colleagues, to understand their hopes and aspirations and importantly their achievements. We all have different strengths in an academic group but we have the same need to feel valued – that is important to me that colleagues feel valued and supported in the achievement of that. I also want EIM to have an identity in the school. We can do that by knowing each other well and sharing a common vision for our success. We can also be noisy –strategic intent backed up by action is very important.

 

What do you know now that you wished you knew when you were a student at university?

At all times, ask questions if you do not understand – do not be afraid to do that. Always seek clarity. At postgraduate (PhD), while you should be continually managing your own work and motivation, it is OK to challenge and evaluate your supervision relationship. Be clear on expectations and understand it is your path to independent scholarship, which is very important in that process. Finally, do not have had a three-month-old son when starting a PhD!

 

What do you do to get rid of stress?

I run. Not very far but 3-4 times a week 6km or so. There is always a good reason not to go, but I know to just head out the door. Music and reading too.

 

Lastly, if people come across you at the coffee-machine, what’s a good conversation starter?

Why Tom Waits is possibly the greatest songwriter on the planet. How Everton faired in the EPL that weekend. The research you are working on.  Not necessarily in that order.

 

Simon is Professor of Marketing and his research focuses on service workers and consumer behaviour with a particular interest in the expectations that customers bring to marketing exchange. He has analytical competences in structural equation modelling and scale development. His work has been widely published in recognised international journals including the Journal of Business Research, Industrial Marketing Management, Marketing Letters, Journal of Marketing Communications, and International Journal of Advertising. He was Co-Editor in Chief of the Journal of Consumer Behaviour (2009-2015) and was a principal investigator on a $220K, two-year OLT (Category 1) grant, examining the resource requirements of professional doctoral candidates in Australian business schools. Simon was an elected member of Executive Committee of the Australia and New Zealand Marketing Academy (ANZMAC) 2012-2015. He currently sits on the Editorial Board of Industrial Marketing Management and Engaged Management Review.  Simon has also written three monographs published by Oxford University Press.

Top tips for women in leadership

Today is International Women’s Day and four of La Trobe University’s experts were asked to give their own top tips for a career as a leader. Three of them are currently connected to the La Trobe Business School.

 

Hone your emotional intelligence

Professor Suzanne Young, Head of the Department of Management, Sport and Tourism at the La Trobe Business School, gives these tips for women in business:

  • Continually work on improving your emotional intelligence. This is not a static characteristic, but can be learnt and improved upon.
  • Think strategically in terms of work priorities and activities you put your hand up for. Be proactive rather than reactive and move away from focusing on the details as you move up the career ladder.
  • Expand your circle of influence through external and internal networks.

Professor Suzanne Young advises women striving for leadership roles to hone their EI.

 

Lead by doing what you love

Dr Susan Inglis is a Professor of Practice in Management and Director of Executive Education at La Trobe Business School, where she teaches leadership. Her career spans more than 20 years as a management consultant, coupled with 10 years of postgraduate study in organisational learning, leadership and management.

Susan offers the following tips for women in leadership roles:

  • Don’t be afraid to take up space – you have a unique range of gifts to offer the world, so share those gifts!
  • Surround yourself with people who believe and support you and remind you of your strengths.
  • It’s easier to lead when doing what you love. Reflect on what brings you joy and then go for it – create an opportunity to inspire others!

‘Surround yourself with people who remind you of your strengths,’ says La Trobe’s Dr Susan Inglis.

 

Make complacency your enemy

Former CEO of the Institute of Public Administration Australia (Victoria), Dr Geraldine Kennett, applies her business and collaboration skills to manage La Trobe Business School’s MBA Program. Her tips for women in leadership are:

  • Play to your strengths – empower yourself by understanding your strengths and using them to overcome your weaknesses.
  • Engage others – seek advice from those senior to you, motivate your peers and coach your staff for success.
  • Make complacency your enemy – apply passion, performance and persistence instead.

Dr Geraldine Kennett encourages passion, performance and persistence.

 

Develop your self-confidence

La Trobe’s Associate Pro Vice-Chancellor of Academic Partnerships and co-author of Women and Money in Australia: Across the generations, Professor Amalia Di Iorio gives her own advice trifecta:

  • Believe in yourself and have confidencein your abilities.
  • Actively seek opportunities to continuously improve your skills, knowledge and visibility in the organisation.
  • Get to know your team and their capabilities, and provide team members with opportunities to maximise their potential.

Professor Amalia Di Iorio recommends confidence, self-belief and a team focus.

 

Perhaps these points can be distilled into three:

  1. Know and trust in your knowledge and abilities.
  2. Look for opportunities to build your self-knowledge, skills and networks.
  3. Support and motivate your team to reach their potential.

As a woman in leadership, you don’t have to change the world single-handedly – but you can be part of the change. With passion, awareness and a drive to bring your team with you on the journey, there’s no limit to what you can achieve.

 

This blog post was originally published on NEST. Read the original article.

Developing a Sustainability Disposition

In 2008, La Trobe Business School (LBS) was one of the first schools to become a Signatory to PRME. LBS has been actively engaged in both embedding responsible management within its school as well as contributing to the PRME network. LBS is starting their second term as a PRME Champion. Ten years on, LBS was selected to be a PRME Champion along with 38 other business schools from across the world who are taking transformative action on integrating the Sustainable Development Goals into three key areas: curriculum, research and partnerships.

 

In 2015, LBS put in place a second year subject focused on Sustainability which is mandatory for all students enrolled in any Business Degree at La Trobe University. Because of its focus on developing a sustainability disposition in students rather than just educating them about the issues, the course has been very well received by students and continues to be an exemplar of cross-disciplinary subject content within the School.  Dr Swati Nagpal  was interviewed about this innovative course.

 

Dr Swati Nagpal receiving the LBS Award in recognition of her continual support of the PRME initiative

 

What is La Trobe Business School’s approach to sustainability in the classroom?

LBS understands the obligation as an institution to advocate for responsible management education throughout the school; in its four departments and its research centres, and by advocating and supporting responsible management initiatives and operations across the university.

A patchwork of subjects addressing Sustainability Education in Business degree courses at La Trobe was replaced in 2015 by a core second year subject entitled ‘BUS2SUS – Sustainability’, for all students enrolled in any Business degree. More than 2,500 students are now enrolled in this compulsory subject every year.

The subject is based on a blended learning design that allows for greater scalability across the entire portfolio of majors within Business and across all our campuses in Australia and abroad. With sustainability as the lens or context for change, students are introduced to systems thinking, tools for solving wicked problems, and the role of advocacy in managing change for sustainability.

 

How have you approached the design and delivery of this core course?

The process of embedding sustainability thinking into the core business curriculum presented a number of challenges, including distinguishing sustainability from related streams of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and non-financial measurement and reporting. The curriculum design was ultimately guided by the need for a future set of skills, rather than by identifying disciplinary content that business graduates might require. These skills include critical thinking, creative problem solving, ethical awareness and teamwork. For example, by working in small groups in class, and engaging with ‘wicked’ global sustainability issues such as climate change, global poverty and renewable energy, students are required to apply a systems lens to examining the true nature of the issues and potential solutions.

There is also an emphasis on creating a ‘safe space’ in classes to tackle often controversial social and environmental issues such as indigenous disadvantage in Australia, the refugee crisis and the potential for a sugar tax. This has required class teachers to be briefed and trained in pedagogical techniques that require reflexive practice and approaches to manage conflict.

 

The course puts a focus on developing a sustainability disposition. Why do you think this is important?

Research on education for sustainability, student surveys and teaching feedback have taught us that developing graduate skills for sustainability is not enough to create the impetus required for students to be change agents for sustainability, there also needs to be an emphasis on creating a ‘mindset’ change. This is enabled in the subject through use of a range of pedagogical design elements to create a learning environment that seeks to bring about this change. For example, through the use of case studies, examples and problem-based scenarios that require students to reflect on their underlying values base and question the status quo in management thought. As such, this subject places a focus on both generic graduate skills such as critical thinking and problem solving, while also creating the disposition towards sustainability and ethical decision-making.

 

How are the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) embedded into this course?

Using the SDGs as a guide, students are introduced to the interplay between the social, environmental and economic pillars of sustainability, and the implications for ethically complex decision-making. Ultimately, educating students new to the SDGs places us in a unique position as the entry point in their educational experience. We believe this is critical in developing their awareness of global issues and challenges so that they can enter the workplace fully equipped to advance and implement policies and practices that will contribute to sustainable business.

 

What advice would you have for other schools thinking of putting something similar into place?

The question of whether business schools should approach embedding sustainability into core curriculum or as an elective has not been resolved to date. Our experience at LBS in taking the ‘core subject’ approach has been positive since we have the institutional support in terms of the University’s focus on sustainability and our historical emphasis and ethos of social justice. Therefore, gaining institutional support for furthering the sustainability agenda is key, along with the resources to make it happen.

The challenge in any modern business subject in sustainably is an emphasis on both the development of graduate skills and students’ disposition towards sustainability and ethical decision-making. This requires modern educators to span the boundary of the classroom and identify opportunities to engage with industry partners and other stakeholders to continuously produce innovative teaching materials and approaches that inspire and motivate students to pursue business ideas that align with the SDGs.

 

 

What other initiatives at your school you are particularly proud of in this area especially in relation to the SDGs.

In 2017, LBS embarked on a series of workshops that brought together delegates from business, local government, education, not for profit and community sectors to discuss what the SDGs mean for them, and create opportunities for collaboration among the sectors towards implementation of the goals.

This outreach project on the SDGs is an international effort by our CR3+ network which includes LBS and PRME Champions Audencia Nantes School of Management (Nantes, France), ISAE/FGV (Curitiba, Brazil) and Hanken School of Economics (Helsinki, Finland). All four business schools have committed to hosting similar workshops in their countries.

Two Australian workshops were held in Wollongong and Albury-Wodonga on 15/11/17 and 29/11/17 respectively. In addition to the original aims as set out in the project proposal, the choice to focus on regional areas was two-fold; firstly, to develop our regional campus’ capacity to build and sustain cross-sector engagement and partnerships on the theme of the SDGs, and secondly, to focus on areas where UN Global Compact Network Australia presence is limited.

 

This post is part of a special feature throughout the month of February focused on schools in Australia and New Zealand. This blog post was originally published on PRIMEtime. Read the original article.

 

La Trobe University’s New Sydney Campus

At La Trobe Business School, students can study a range of Business courses at one of Australia’s leading universities in our new state-of-the-art Sydney Campus. Officially opened in 2017, the new campus is ideally located in the centre of the city’s business precinct. It is close to part-time work and internship opportunities, and is just minutes’ walk away from major transport hubs, shopping centres, vibrant café districts and a number of Sydney’s world-renowned icons.
With just under 1000 students, the Sydney Campus offers a friendly and supportive community for you to learn and make friends.  Our personalised learning approach has attracted students from more than 30 countries to the campus, which contributes to a rich, multicultural education experience.

 

Find out more about this exciting campus in the video below:

 

Business School Programs offered at Sydney are:

  • LMBBSY – Bachelor of Business
  • LBCSY – Bachelor of Accounting
  • LBIBSY – Bachelor of International Business
  • LMPMSY – Master of Management (Project Management)
  • LMPASY – Master of Professional Accounting

James Fazzino appointed as Vice Chancellor’s Fellow

At the end of last year, James Fazzino was appointed La Trobe University Vice-Chancellor’s Fellow. James is not new to La Trobe University. He is a La Trobe alumnus, holding a Bachelor of Economics (Honours) from the University. He is also currently a member of the La Trobe Business School Advisory Board, and in 2016 was appointed as an Adjunct Professor in the La Trobe Business School.

 

James Fazzino

James has had a successful career in the international chemicals industry, and has just concluded a highly successful eight-year term as Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director of Incitec Pivot Limited. He also served as the Chief Financial Officer and Finance Director at Incitec, and had senior finance roles in ICI/Orica including CFO Chemicals Group, Assistant Treasurer and Head of Investor Relations. Under his leadership, Incitec was transformed from a fertiliser company operating in two Australian states to a global diversified industrial chemicals business. It is now the world’s second largest supplier of commercial explosives, and Australia’s largest manufacturer and supplier of fertilisers. James is currently Chair of Manufacturing Australia, a CEO-led coalition of Australia’s 10 leading manufacturing companies, and is a member of the Australian Energy Market Operator’s Expert Advisory Panel.

 

In his new role, James will advise the Vice-Chancellor as well as the current and future leadership of the La Trobe Business School on the strategic directions for the School.

 

The Business School will benefit greatly from James’ expertise and experience in leading an ASX Top 50 company. He will share his experience with the next generation of leaders, and will build new industry and research links and partnerships in the School. James will teach students about the practical experience of business delivery, assist in developing a network of business practitioners to teach across the School, and will be available to mentor both staff and students.

 

James has recently been interviewed by NEST, was interviewed about his new position at LTU by Skynews and wrote an article about putting customers at the centre in the energy debate for The Australian.

Watch: What failure can teach you

This article was first published on Nest, a haven of new ideas for people who are all kinds of clever. Read the original article.

Being able to bounce back after failure, learn from your mistakes and forge ahead with resilience are vital skills both in and out of the workplace. According to one survey, 91 per cent of HR decision-makers predict that resilience will be key to employability in the next few years.

For Michelle Gallaher, La Trobe alumnus and 2017 Telstra Victorian Business Woman of the Year, failing is one of the most important things you can do. Watch our video to find out what Michelle learned from failing her first degree, and what failure can teach you.

Develop your resilience through La Trobe’s Career Ready Advantage program.

LBS alumni event a huge success!

On 25 October, La Trobe Business School welcomed Dr Fiona McKenzie from the Australian Futures Project for the school’s annual Alumni Event.

Dr Fiona McKenzie was welcomed by La Trobe Business School’s Head of School, Professor Paul Mather. Event attendees included LBS alumni, university and industry stakeholders.

In her speech, Dr Fiona McKenzie spoke about how businesses today are influenced by massive digital disruption and are taking the opportunity to expand globally. This trend has often caused businesses process transform and jobs performed by people to be redefined.

La Trobe Business School would like to thank Dr Fiona McKenzie for attending!

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