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Tag: Sport Management

Visiting Manchester, Liverpool and London during LBS’ Sport Study Tour

During the winter semester, several students went on a sport study tour to the United Kingdom as part of their Sport Management degree. Read about the tour and students’ amazing experience.

The tour reinvigorated my belief on why I chose to study sport and what direction I want to take for the future.

Hamza Nur

The subject

The Sport Study Tour (BUS3SST) is a winter elective subject that provides third-year Bachelor of Business (Sport Management) students the opportunity to extend their formal academic learning beyond the local classroom into the global sport environment.

The tour brings students for two weeks to the UK. While overseas, students are based at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU), a partner of La Trobe University, whose industry partners include Manchester City FC, Manchester City Council and UK Sport. 

Participating in this study tour allowed for students to understand the multicultural and sporting City of Manchester and enhance their understanding of different cultural contexts, values and practices, as part of the process of becoming and global citizen. Assessments included:

  • Case study on the UK sport system (Individual)
  • Daily reflective journal and photos (Individual)
  • Group presentation on sport development program (pairs)

The students

Ten students (8 males and 2 females) attended the study tour and were accompanied by Dr Pam Kappelides from LBS and Emily Harbrow from LTU Sport. Emily is an LBS Sport Management alumna and worked at Manchester City FC meaning that besides the many contacts she has in the UK, students heard first-hand about her journey in sport.

The students partaking in the study tour

The study tour

Upon arrival, students enjoyed a walking tour of Manchester, were officially welcomed by the Pro Vice Chancellor (Research) and after an introduction to the subject had their first lecture on UK Sports Volunteer Management by Catherine Elliott, senior lecturer of Sport Management & Marketing at MMU. Other (guest) lectures organised for the students included:

  • Lecture on UK Sport Policy and Sport Mega Events by Professor Jonathan Grix and Paul Brannagan from MMU
  • Guest lecture by Colin Bridgford, CEO at Manchester Football Association
  • Guest lecture by Neil Fairlamb from the Manchester City Council on Strategic Lead – Parks, Leisure & Events
  • Lecture on E-Sports by Dr Qi Peng from MMU
  • Guest lecture by Matt Stocks from Greater Sport UK

Obviously, the tour included a variety of interesting and sport focused field trips, such as:

  • National Football Museum
  • Manchester Institute of Health and Performance
  • Old Trafford Cricket Ground
  • Manchester Velodrome
  • Manchester City Elite
  • Manchester City Football Club
Students at Old Trafford Cricket Ground

Besides Manchester, students also visited Liverpool and London. In Liverpool students enjoyed a Beatles and City Walking Tour before attending the Netball World Cup watching Australia play England. In London students attended Wimbledon followed by a tour through Wembley Stadium. While in London, students also had the opportunity to talk with another LBS Sport Management alumni over dinner – Gareth Ficarra – who is currently working at Arsenal Football Club.

The two-week trip finished with students’ group presentations and the presentation of fun awards for each student on their participation during the tour.

Student feedback

We asked the students for some feedback about the trip, and they all agreed that it was a trip of a life-time!

The study tour was a fantastic opportunity to immerse ourselves in international sporting organisations and continue to grow our networks at an international level.

Haylee Jesensek

The study tour was an opportunity of a lifetime! The tour provided the chance to grow internationally and created great networking opportunities as well as a great learning experience. The tour gave us the opportunity to hear and connect with Sport CEOs and La Trobe Alumni.

Max Hannah

The UK study tour provided all students with incredible exposure to some of the most influential sporting organisations in the world, as well as unparalleled networking opportunities with highly regarded sports professionals throughout England.

Will Holding

The trip was amazing, I was able to fulfill a life dream. It was really interesting to see the difference between Australian and UK sporting culture, through the stadium tours and presentations. Before going on the trip, I was quite unclear of what I wanted in my future. Although this may still be the case, I know 100% that my future belongs in sport after this amazing experience.

Hayden Atherton

The UK sports study tour was a once in a life time experience. To be able to see the leading international sporting clubs and their facilities was unbelievable. The opportunity to establish international sporting connections gave me an insight into opportunities beyond Australia. Being able to experience the atmosphere at world class sporting events is something I will treasure forever.

Jacqui Lawson

LBS alumnus and MCFC leader talks about what makes a successful team

What does it take to guide an elite football team to win their record-breaking third championship title?

Former professional women’s soccer player and La Trobe Business School alumnus, Louisa Bisby, takes us behind the scenes in her role as W-League team manager at Melbourne City Football Club (MCFC).

 

 

Team manager versus coach

My position as a team manager is very different to that of a coach, because I don’t assess on-field performance and select the team. Instead, my role and responsibility is to offer individual off-field support to team members and ensure all football operations run smoothly. This starts from the moment a player signs with MCFC, throughout the season and to the end of their time with the club. It involves organising player registrations, transfer papers, flights, accommodation, transport, education assistance, post-football ambitions and any administration.

Logistically, it’s my responsibility to ensure that the players, coaches and support staff have all that they require to service the team to their best ability.

The most enjoyable part of my job is the variety of tasks. It’s everything from helping on-pitch, to organising equipment and kit; to off-field football operations and MCFC activations, such as coordinating player appearances. I communicate with a diverse group of external organisations, from governing bodies (like Football Federation Australia, International Football Federations such as the National Women’s Soccer League in the US, ASADA, and other W-League clubs), to community clubs, hotels, transport companies and travel agencies. The role’s diversity gives me a better understanding of the football landscape, players’ needs as individuals and their goals for life after football.

Often, I’ll be the first person a new player will see at the airport when they arrive from overseas or interstate. This means my initial interaction with them can potentially determine their first impression of the club. Should they stay, it’s then my role to make sure that they know MCFC provides support off-field and that they can approach me with any matter of concern.

As team manager, you need the ability to create a professional bond with everyone, on and off the field.

 

A team of differences

There’s many different personalities, cultures and age groups within a team. No one person is the same. Each player comes with a different story, upbringing and set of experiences. Within the A-League team, the youngest player is aged 17 and the oldest is in their 30s, so their levels of knowledge and life experience can vary.

As a previous player in the Australian W-League and Matildas representing Australia, I used to play with, and against, some of the MCFC W-League team, which also helps build trust. Due to having seen me play and what I have achieved, players feel confident that I understand the game and what it takes to reach the highest level.

A big part of creating a bond is the trust and the confidence that someone has to come and talk to you, whether it’s positive or negative. You need to be able to guide players in the right direction, ensure your choice of words is appropriate and, if needed, send a player to someone who is qualified to give the right advice.

Committing to a common goal is what leads a sporting team to success. Players and staff must be dedicated to supporting one another on and off-field to win a title. Collectively, people need to ensure that everything is in place throughout the journey for players to succeed. It’s not just about the football operations, but the professionalism to help players come into an environment that’s easy, where they can walk in, get changed, and know what they’re doing at all times.

It’s known that if there’s something else in an athlete’s life, they’re more successful, because good sport/life balance gives them another focus away from elite competition and the pressure to perform. It is my goal to get players studying or doing something else other than playing football.

 

Studying at LTU

Completing a Bachelor of Business (Sport Management) at La Trobe was beneficial for my career. It gave me insight into how the sports industry worked, how policies and procedures were implemented and also accounting and budgeting. It helped me establish my organisational skills and see the importance of communication with a variety of people from all aspects of life. As part of the course, I did a practical placement at VicSport, which supplemented the theory I’d learned.

Having studied at La Trobe, I can say it’s one of the best sports universities in Australia.

It’s a very supportive, athlete-friendly university. My lecturers were easy to talk to and very understanding of my football career. It’s not just the course content that allows you to gain career opportunities, it’s also advice from the lecturers when you need it and a professional network. The teachers have a lot of contacts within the sports industry. Since graduating, I’ve maintained relationships with lecturers like Professor Russell Hoye and Dr Pam Kappelides. They’re always willing to have a conversation and ask me how I am.

My advice is to gain as much experience as you can while you’re at university. At university, I knuckled down, studied hard for three years, made networks and did some volunteering. I helped out with couple of local football clubs and volunteered at events like triathlon and rugby. Even if it’s not a sporting event, you’re still going to learn something, there are always logistics behind it. It’s about challenging yourself – the more experience you have, the higher your chance of getting a job.

 

La Trobe University and A-League soccer team the Melbourne City Football Club have been proud partners since the club’s inception in 2009

 

My first job was as Game Development Officer for the former Melbourne Heart Football Club, which put my uni degree to good use in the workplace. In this role, I organised, planned and managed festival clinics and community events in suburban and regional areas, schools, local community centres and football clubs. The work also involved match day activations, including small-sided games at half time, football clinics and mascots (5-12-year-olds that walked out with players before the match).

When I got the job at Melbourne Heart FC, they didn’t only just ask the references on my resume, they also rang different coaches and spoke to my lecturers to find further information about me.

It’s a big industry with tight networks. Your sporting achievements and behaviour, along with your professional reputation, definitely contribute. You need to behave in a manner that will assist you with potential future work, regardless of whether you’re an elite athlete or not.

 

This blog post was originally published on NEST. Read the original article.

Simmons journey takes him from UAE to Vicsport

Randall2.jpg

Simmons is loving his role as the Events and Administration coordinator at Vicsport.

After living in the United Arab Emirates for most of his childhood, La Trobe Bachelor of Business (Sport Management) graduate Randall Simmons took a chance and moved to Australia’s heartland of sport to pursue a career in the industry.

“I selected La Trobe because of the quality of its Sport Management course, and the opportunity to learn about sport management in the capital of sport was hard to pass up on.”

Gaining expertise with organisations such as Melbourne City Football Club, Carlton Football Club, the Victorian Olympic Council and the North Melbourne Football Club, Simmons made an immediate impact.

Simmons performed duties in a number of roles and across various departments including hospitality, delivering community programs and volunteer training.

“When I moved to Melbourne, I made a conscious decision to get as much sport experience as possible before I graduated.”

“By volunteering in these organisations I was able to gain the experience which most organisations in sport look for and this helped me land a full time role.”

“Sporting organisations look to employ people who have worked in the industry, volunteering is a big box to tick.”

20160603_CFC_LATROBE_UNI_03.jpg
Randall completed placement at the Carlton Football Club as part of the Sport Management practicum.

The skills Randall gained in these positions assisted him to secure employment as the Events and Administration coordinator at VicSport immediately after his degree.

The La Trobe graduate was among a wave of applicants for the position, including many from the same graduating cohort as his own.  Upon reflection, Randall says it was his volunteering, internships and tailored course work that set him apart from the rest.

“The Bachelor of Business (Sport Management) degree was designed to give us real world experience of what is happening in the industry.”

“From Sport Marketing to Sport Governance, I have been able to take certain aspects from all my subjects and apply it to my role and in my organisation.”

LTU Volunteer 2
Randall’s performed duties across a number of departments while volunteering at the Melbourne City Football Club.

By studying a Bachelor of Business (Sport Management), you could work with La Trobe’s network of sporting partners such as the Carlton Football Club, Melbourne Rebels and Melbourne City Football Club.

This post was originally published on the La Trobe University Intern Diaries Blog.

Sport in Regional Australia Conference

La Trobe Business School Lauren Jackson Sport in Regional Australia Bendigo

On 9 and 10 November 2015, La Trobe Business School will be hosting the second Sport in Regional Australia Conference on the university’s Bendigo Campus.

Abstract

In 2015 the conference will focus on a 360° view on sport within regional settings, including;

  • What makes sport and sporting events a success outside the metro area?
  • What do host towns want?
  • What do sports and event owners need?
  • What keeps participants happy?
  • What do regional clubs need to thrive?

Speakers include Australian professional basketball player Lauren Jackson and former CEO of the Australian Football League, Andrew Demetriou.

Plus, a one stop opportunity to sell your event to host cities with our exclusive ‘Host City Speed Networking’ session.

Find the complete conference program, here.

Who should attend?

The Sport in Regional Australia conference is the only sports conference targeted to the development of sport in regional and rural communities.

Everyone involved in the sport industry and interested in growing sport throughout Australia should attend, including:

  • State and local government
  • Government authorities
  • Regional sports assemblies
  • National and state sporting organisations
  • Local and regional sporting clubs and associations
  • Event owners
  • Sports business operators in sponsorship, event management and marketing
  • Sports management, marketing or business students

Conference

Date: 9 and 10 November 2015

Venue: The Capital Theatre, 50 View Street, Bendigo VIC 3550

Register: register via the event booking page.

Further information: Please contact Associate Professor Matthew Nicholson via m.nicholson@latrobe.edu.au, or (03) 5444 7905

 

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