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The CR3+ Conference is coming up!

The CR3+ Conference, hosted by La Trobe Business School, is just two weeks away. Where is this conference about? Why is this conference so important? What are some of the highlights?

What is CR3+?

Initially, Audencia Business School (France), Hanken School of Economics (Finland) and ISAE FGV (Brazil) decided to cooperate in their implementation of the United Nations’ Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME). This collaboration resulted in the joint organisation of an international conference on Corporate Responsibility, named CR3. When La Trobe Business School became a signatory of PRME, they joined CR3 and so CR3 became CR3+1. The aim of these four PRME champions is to exchange ideas, pedagogical processes, curriculum and research in the area of corporate responsibility.

2019 CR3+ Conference

On the 24th and 25th of October, LBS is hosting the seventh CR3+ Conference. The theme of the conference is Using dialogue to build partnerships for sustainability.

CR3+ logo - Using dialogue to build partnerships for sustainability

As we work towards building a more sustainable world we cannot work in isolation. Partnerships are necessary to ensure long term success. However, the partnership model may be problematic, with issues arising such as co-option and abuse of power. Differences between actors can also lengthen the journey and make the measure of success difficult to determine. Hence, this conference explores how partnerships can bring about sustainable solutions as we work together on progressing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

LBS has arranged a fantastic line-up of keynote speakers, panel discussants and other presenters.

Keynotes

Professor Dennis McDermott, La Trobe University Pro Vice-Chancellor (Indigenous), will be giving an academic keynote on partnerships, with a focus on the role of indigenous values in framing our understanding and implementation of partherships.

Jillian Reid, Principal in the Responsible Investment Team at Mercer, will talk about investing in a time of climate change, the growth in sustainability themed opportunities, and the role of the sustainable development goals in investment decision-making. 

Dr Leeora Black, Principal Risk Advisory at Deloitte Australia, is an expert on the Modern Slavery Act, and she will be speaking about new and different kinds of partnerships that are being driven by the Act.

Workshops

The workshop Exploring challenges and priorities of embedding SDGs in business schools using Lego SeriousPlay© is an interactive, action-based workshop facilitated by Heather Stewart and Rob Hales from Griffith Business School. This collaborative style of working on individual and group levels is proven to extend ideas, views and often break down assumptions in a safe and non-judgemental environment. The aim of the workshop is to develop new skills in resilience, creativity and lateral thinking in order to employ and establish sustainability within business schools.

Prof. Nava Subramaniam from RMIT and Dr. Raghu Raman from Amrita University are facilitating the workshop Amrita Live-In-Labs, which introduces Live-in-Labs® – a multidisciplinary experiential learning program that breaks down classroom and lab barriers by applying learned theory in real-world settings. This credit-based academic program draws on principles of lean research for the development and deployment of sustainable solutions for current challenges faced by rural communities in India. By directly living in rural communities (labs) and co-designing solutions to development challenges, program participants gain first-hand knowledge and know-how of identifying and assessing community needs and subsequently developing and implementing viable solutions through various participatory methods.

#CR3LTU

LBS will be using #CR3LTU on Twitter to keep you updated on speakers, presentations and other great conference moments. Join in and share your views and best moments of the conference too!

Our Partners

La Trobe Business School recognises and appreciates the support of its PRME partners and Mercer and Lifeskills in the delivery of this exciting event.  

We’re looking forward to welcome you to the conference!

1Inspirational Guide for the Implementation of PRME: Placing Sustainability at the heart of management education (2017). Edited by Principles for Responsible Management Education. New York: Routledge.  

LBS’ United Nations PRME commitments

In 2007, during the United Nations Global Compact Leaders Summit in Geneva, the Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) were launched. Since then, PRME has become the largest organised relationship between the United Nations and business schools. LBS joined PRME quickly after its inception.

Last year LBS celebrated its tenth anniversary as a signatory to UN PRME. We also released our latest PRME report and we’re hosting the 2019 CR3+ Conference.

PRME’s mission

According to the UN Global Impact the mission of PRME is:

“To transform business and management education, research and thought leadership globally, while promoting awareness about the Sustainable Development Goals, and developing the responsible business leaders of tomorrow.”

UN Sustainable Development Goals

The PRME philosophy sits alongside the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), formally adopted in Paris in 2015, as part of the universal, integrated and transformative 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The 17 SDGs balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: the economic, social and environmental. The goals and targets provide a framework to stimulate action over the next years in areas of critical importance for the long-term sustainability of human society and the planet.

PRME report

LBS just released its latest PRME report (read it here). The report outlines the ongoing commitment to each of the six Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME):

  1. Purpose: Develop the capabilities of students to be future generators of sustainable value for business and society at large and to work for an inclusive and sustainable global economy.

  2. Values: Incorporate the values of global social responsibility as portrayed in international initiatives such as the United Nations Global Compact.

  3. Method: create educational frameworks, materials, processes and environments that enable effective learning experiences for responsible leadership.

  4. Research: Engage in conceptual and empirical research that advances our understanding about the role, dynamics, and impact of corporations in the creation of sustainable social, environmental and economic value.

  5. Partnership: Interact with managers of business corporations to extend our knowledge of their challenges in meeting social and environmental responsibilities and to explore jointly effective approaches to meeting these challenges.

  6. Dialogue: Facilitate and support dialogue and debate among educators, students, business, government, consumers, media, civil society organisations and other interested groups and stakeholders on critical issues related to global social responsibility and sustainability.

CR3+ Conference

Besides our 10th year anniversary, and the release of our PRME report, LBS is also hosting the seventh edition of the CR3+ Conference in late 2019. CR3+ is a partnership between LBS, Audencia Business School (France), Hanken School of Economics (Finland) and ISAE Brazilian Business School (Brazil). The partnership builds on the schools’ involvement with PRME.

The topic of the CR3+ Conference is “Using Dialogue to Build Partnerships for Sustainability”. More information about this great conference can be found here.

If you want to know more about LBS’ involvement with PRME, please email Dr Swati Nagpal.

LBS’ involvement with UN’s PRME

CR3+ is a partnership between LBS, Audencia Business School (France), Hanken School of Economics (Finland) and ISAE Brazilian Business School (Brazil). The partnership builds on the schools’ involvement with the UN Principles for Responsible Management Education, also known as PRME.

 

2018 CR3+ conference

From the 12th until the 14th of June the 6th CR3+ conference was held at Audencia Business School. The theme of the conference was “Navigating the Plural Voices of Corporate Responsibility (CR)”, which recognises that CR is situated at the interface of business and society, and as such requires business to draw on a multitude of voices (and in some cases, the voiceless) to reduce their negative impact and/or contribute to society’s wellbeing. The conference had four key areas:

  • Education for sustainably
  • Theoretical voices in Corporate Responsibility research
  • Stakeholder engagement
  • Giving voice to the unheard actors in Corporate Responsibility

 

LBS was well represented with 7 delegates attending the conference; Professor Suzanne Young, Dr Leila Afshari, Dr Nicole El-Haber, Dr Jillian Cavanagh, Dr Swati Nagpal, Dr William Keeton and Ms Patricia Pariona Cabrera. The papers presented by our LBS academics covered wide-ranging topics including community engagement, employee volunteering, corruption, graduate skills for sustainability and workers with intellectual disabilities:

  • Graduate Business Skills for Sustainability: The Nexus of Curriculum and Pedagogy.
  • Beyond CSR: Workers with intellectual disability and their ‘calling’ to further their careers.
  • Corporate responsibility and community engagement: complex decision-making in water organisations in Victoria, Australia.
  • Employee Volunteering: Individual and Organizational Levels of Action.
  • Authentic leaders and corrupt practices: Overshadowing effect of corruption normalization and highly regulated localization.

Why not bulldoze business schools?

There were also expert panel discussions, including one that Professor Suzanne Young was part of entitled “Why not bulldoze business schools”, in response to Martin Parker’s article in The Guardian.

The panel members took opposing points of view with some speaking of the importance of business schools in challenging the status quo and embedding issues of responsibility and sustainability into their ways of working; whereas others spoke of business education cementing the norms of business practices and the focus on profit and self-interest. Professor Young took the former viewpoint and gave examples of La Trobe University and La Trobe Business School’s values and practices. Examples included the university’s gender equality practices, sustainability and responsibility courses and curriculum, hosting of governance and sustainability conferences, as well as Sustainable Development Goals workshops.

10 years a UN PRME signatory

2018 marks LBS’ 10th year as a UN PRME signatory and the CR3+ conference is just one example of our global partnerships in corporate responsibility and sustainability. You can read more about LBS’ involvement with UN PRME and the progress LBS is making in research, curriculum and partnerships in our Sharing of Information on Progress (SIP) report later this year. Watch this space for more information.

2019 CR3+ conference

It’s also exciting to announce that LBS will be hosting the 7th CR3+ conference in late 2019 at our city campus. If you would like to be involved in the conference organising committee or the UN PRME community of practice at LBS, please contact Dr Swati Nagpal.

The 5th CR3+ Conference on the theme of Making Corporate Responsibility Useful, cohosted by LBS, Hanken School of Economics (Helsinki Finland), Audencia Business School (Nantes, France) and ISAE/FGV (Curitiba, Brazil)

By Suzanne Young

Recently, Dr Suzanne Young and Dr Sajad Fayesi represented La Trobe Business School at the CR3+ Conference.

Within the overall conference theme of “Making Corporate Responsibility Useful”, a number of sub-themes where discussed including CSR and Global supply chains; CSR, human resource management and labour; Corporatization and CSR; Research and business education; ESG data; Social and human sustainability at work; and Sustainable development,

The CR3+ network has its roots in informal relationships in the early days of UN PRME, between three signatory business schools: Audencia (Nantes, France), ISAE/FGV (Curitiba, Brazil) and Hanken (Helsinki, Finland) –these are the “3” in CR3+. These three were soon joined by La Trobe Business School and at that stage we stopped counting our core partners – just adding the “+” for the infinite possibilities of future collaborations and partnerships. A simple equation with many possible solutions. That we are now in our 5th iteration of the conference is a strong testimony of the value of international collaboration especially in relation to the kind of challenges we are posed within the CR discourse and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Dr Sajad Fayesi and Dr Suzanne Young both presented papers and chaired streams at the conference.  Their papers are listed below:

Fayesi, S,

Tensions in Procurement Sustainability: An Exploratory Study

Nagpal, S., Young, S., Marjoribanks, T. and Durden G.,

CSR and Social Risk: From Risk Minimization to Risk Sharing

Young, S., Markey, R., McIvor, J. and Wright, C. F.,

Labour, Climate Change adaptation and the Education Sector

Young, S., Marais, M. Marjoribanks, T., Durden, G. and Douyen, R.,

ESG Risk Reporting in Australia and France: An Institutional Analysis

A link to the 2017 Conference papers can be found here.

In addition Suzanne was a panelist on the all-conference UN PRME themed discussion which focused on the role of the PRME in transforming society, business and education and the role of the UN SDGs in each country and in the respective business schools.

Australia ranks 20th globally in meeting the SDGs. It has one of the highest carbon emissions per person, rates poorly on clean energy and climate change goals, environment goals, with high levels of solid waste and land clearing and loss of biodiversity. It also exhibits high rates of obesity. However it rates highly on lack of poverty, education and water quality, and equality.

Academic institutions can contribute much to the achievement of the SDGs, for example, through incorporating the SDGs into curriculum and focusing research efforts on SDG related challenges, raising awareness of the SDGs, and taking up the opportunities the framework offers for building collaborative projects with other sectors.

Today the CR3+ Network is working collaboratively on a project as one of the United Nations Champion Business Schools in the Principles of Responsible Business Education (PRME). The project entails conducting workshops in regional Australia on the Sustainable Development Goals with members from the PRME higher educational business schools, members of the UN Global Compact, businesses, NGOs and government to present and interact on the theme of the SDGs. The outcomes of the workshops will be improved dialogue and networks, and the initiating of joint projects on the SDGs. If you would like further information or to participate in these workshops please contact Dr Suzanne Young.

The 6th CR3+ Conference will be held in Nantes France at the Audencia Business School in 2018.

 

LBS Researchers attend the International Conference on Responsible Marketing at XLRI

1st row L –R: Marthin Nanere, Tata L. Raghuram, P. Venugopal, Timothy Marjoribanks, Clare D’ Souza, (Ms), Sanjeev Varshney, Supriti Mishra, Vinay Kanetkar
2nd row L – R: Shubhangi Salokhe, Suchita Jha, Sasmita Dash, Ms. Anne Renee Brouwer, Mr Anabel Benjamin Bara, ShabbirHusain R.V., Bharti Varshney,
3rd row L – R: Aniruddha Chatterjee, Shaunak Roy, Peter Mathies, Ashok Prasad, Jubin Jacob John, Pranay Kumar Singh, Arvind Selvaraj, Pratyush Ranjan

XLRI- Xavier School of Management (Jamshedpur – India) in collaboration with La Trobe Business School, organised the International Conference on Responsible Marketing’ on January 23-24, 2017. XLRI is also a PRME (Principles for Responsible Management Education) signatory and in 2015-16 was ranked 4th among the prestigious 91 business schools in India. The Chairs of this conference were Prof. Pingali Venugopal, and Prof. Sanjeev Varshney from XLRI. It was co-chaired by staff from the La Trobe Business School, Associate  Professor Clare D’Souza, Professor Timothy Marjoribanks and Associate Professor Suzanne Young.

The conference invited researchers and practitioners to share their understanding on Responsible Marketing and provided a forum to engage in ideas, new directions and create innovative practices that impact responsible marketing. Discussions evolved around the theoretical underpinnings of the multi-dimensional nature of sustainability, responsible marketing, ethical issues, knowledge and behaviour towards sustainable consumption.

The 56 papers presented at the conference came from different business schools in India, Australia, USA, Canada and Pakistan.  It brought together a strong network of connections and provided a platform for researchers and practitioners to explore future strategies in the area. Indeed! it stirred up the ‘responsibility revolution’ for local businesses.

Fr. Abraham (SJ) gave the welcome address (centre). Mr. Anand Sen (second left) inaugurated the conference. There was some discussion around XLRI activities which was given by Prof. P Venugopal (second right).

Fr. Abraham (SJ) gave the welcome address. Mr. Anand Sen (President, TQM and Steel Business, Tata Steel) inaugurated the conference. In his address, Mr. Anand Sen highlighted the need to advocate responsible consumption and decrease wastage. There was some discussion around XLRI activities which was given by Prof. P Venugopal.

The key note addresses were given by Fr. Oswald Mascarenhas, S.J. (JRD Tata Chair Professor of Business Ethics at XLRI), who addressed the topic of “Responsible Marketing in a Turbulent market” and Mr. B. Hariharan (Vice President, ITC Hotels) who described how ITC is “Designing & Marketing Responsible Luxury”.

Professor Timothy Marjoribanks giving the keynote address.

Professor Timothy Marjoribanks (Associate Head of La Trobe Business School) keynote speech addressed the conference theme, as well as the profound role and reflection of LTU’s business school activities.  He captured the essence of PRME, a core tenet of sustainability and highlighted LTU’s position of strength by being the first PRME signatory in Australia.  His address was infused with a sense of optimism for responsible marketing. He emphasized that such opportunities for dialogue, research and collaboration with XLRI make important contributions to our common endeavor of fostering partnerships and attaining goodwill. Furthermore, cross country collaboration results in a vortex of ideas and outcomes that is highly significant.

LBS PhD students, Mr. Peter Matheis (left), Ms. Anne Brouwer (center) and Mr. Jubin Jacob John (right)

LBS PhD students, Mr. Peter Matheis (left), Ms. Anne Brouwer (center) and Mr. Jubin Jacob John (right)

Three of our enterprising PhD students, Mr. Peter Matheis, Ms. Anne Brouwer and Mr. Jubin Jacob John presented their work at this conference. Peter’s work hinges around ethical consumption and sustainability, where he explores the mechanics of ethical behaviour of consumers and examines the complexities of the intention-behaviour gap. Anne’s paper on greenwashing and its influences on consumer decision making offered great practical insights on how to effectively identify greenwashing.  Jubin’s work resonates on institutional pressures for responsible supply chain procurement. The scientific efforts in the supply chain procurement identifies ISO 14000 standards to induce greater systemic efficacy. They were interesting papers, addressing emerging new knowledge that pioneers in scholastic and research fields within this area can use some of these theoretical underpinnings to expand their work.

Dr Marthin Nanere

Is Green Marketing – a Myth, a Fallacy or Prophecy? Several authors have provided a critique of both theory and practice on green marketing. Dr Marthin Nanere from the Business School presented his discussion around green marketing and showed how eco-labels, can contribute to progress towards greater sustainability. Taking eco labels into account and integrating it with the principles of green marketing provide opportunities for gaining competitive advantage. His paper makes a meaningful contribution to the field of responsible marketing.

In addition to the conference, there was a two-day Faculty Development Program on Responsible Marketing to help faculty and doctoral students develop curriculum and cases for teaching Responsible Marketing. In the photograph below are the participants and members of the Faculty Development Program.  The Faculty Development Program was conducted by faculty from XLRI and La Trobe University. Both days had highly stimulating sessions that concluded in awarding the best team a prize for their outlined curriculum.

The buzz surrounding the conference, the sessions featuring practitioners and how they approach responsible marketing, the academic debates on responsibility and ethics whetted the audience’s appetite. La Trobe staff and students were proud to be part of this amazing conference as engaged and valued members.

Hanoi: Values, Ethics and Diversity

By Catherine Ordway

I was visiting the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) yesterday for a meeting, and I was struck by the beauty of the sculpture (pictured above). The female paralympic basketballer is reaching for the ball – and the clear blue Canberra sky. I reflected on what “diversity” now means for organisations, and how that might translate into workplace practices for the students I am about to meet in Hanoi, Vietnam later this week.

I am teaching the subject “Values, Ethics and Diversity in Organisations” as part of the Master of Management. This subject is: “designed to develop students’ critical thinking and research skills to contribute to an informed analysis of the role of values, ethics and diversity in contemporary organisations. Through the use of ethical theories, the subject aims to develop students’ abilities to re- frame organisational practices and to include ethical considerations in organisational decision-making. The concept of workplace diversity is introduced and evaluated in Australian and global contexts. Frameworks and tools for managing business ethics and diversity are introduced and critically evaluated. The subject is designed to meet principles 1-4 of the PRME principles.”

The United Nations (UN) Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) initiative of the UN Global Compact seeks to inspire and champion responsible management education, research, and thought leadership globally. As set out in La Trobe’s most recent UNPRME report, I am pleased to be one of the: “11 Professors of Practice with significant and ongoing industry experience to ensure our teaching and curriculum keep step with industry practice.

The Professor of Practice title also seeks to highlight what industry can contribute to academia and while many Australian business schools offer industry experts positions as casual or adjunct staff, La Trobe is the first university in Australia to formally employ them and integrate them into the day-to-day operations of the school. The Professors of Practice contribute practical advice and industry networks and connections to our students, while improving curriculum design by ensuring it is relevant and up-to-date with industry standards and trends. As well as contributing to research and teaching, our Professors of Practice facilitate meaningful engagement with leaders in business, government policy making and the not-for-profit sector”.

The cooperation with Hanoi University is a very exciting initiative, and am very happy to be a part of it.

Sustainable Business Examples from Around the World – Italy, Australia, and New Zealand

primetime

By Giselle Weybrecht

As businesses become more and more engaged in sustainability around the world, we are presented with an increasing range of examples of active companies. However, when I speak with students and faculty, they say that they often hear about the same examples from the same international companies over and over again.

In an attempt to share some new best practice examples, I asked a handful of faculty members from around the world about their favourite classroom examples of local companies that are actively involved in sustainability. Here are some examples from Italy, Australia, and New Zealand.

Manuela Brusoni and Veronica Vecchi, SDA Bocconi School of Management, Italy

Consumer banking sector Intesa Sanpaolo: Within the Intesa Sanpaolo Group, Banca Prossima is the bank with the mission of serving non-profit organisations, with a specific service model, products and consulting services dedicated to this type of customers. The Bank has developed a rating model for social businesses that integrates the traditional methods of bank analysis with elements peculiar to the third sector, such as the ability in fundraising. Furthermore, Banca Prossima launched in 2011 “Terzo Valore”, a crowdfunding portal which allows anyone to lend or donate money to non-profit organisation projects directly, without intermediaries and with principal repayment guaranteed by the Bank.

Food sector Barilla: Barilla is the top quality and leading pasta producer in the world, which promotes the mediterranean diet as the best and healthiest solution for the people and the planet. Barilla founded the Barilla Centre for Food and Nutrition (BCFN) to informs not only policy makers and insiders of the agri-food chain, but all the people on the big topics linked to food and nutrition with regards to climate change and the world’s paradoxes. Barilla has been considered the most sustainable pasta supplier by the “Sustainability Index Programme” of Walmart.

Fashion Brunello Cucinelli: The core mission of the company is based on a contemporary form of humanism that over the years the international press has identified as a “humanistic” capitalism, where profit can be sought without damaging mankind. Its clients view Brunello Cucinelli as an expression of a sophisticated concept of contemporary lifestyle and the brand is firmly rooted in quality excellence, Italian craftsmanship and creativity; these pillars are considered the foundations on which sustainable growth can be built in the long run.

Learn more about how SDA Bocconi is engaging students in impact investing.

Suzanne Young, La Trobe Business School, Australia

Yarra Valley Water which has mapped their practices against the SDGs based on understanding what issues the organisation can influence.. These included clean water and sanitation, industry innovation and infrastructure and gender equality.

As another example, the National Australia Bank has a focus on working towards a more inclusive society, including financial inclusion. They are using the SDGs as a way to mobilise innovation to drive business and societal success. The Bank is supporting agribusiness customers to value natural capital for instance. The SDG of Decent Work and Economic Growth and No Poverty provide a lens for their work, especially in impact investing.

Learn more about La Trobe’s participation in the CR3+ Network.

Christian Schott, Victoria Business School, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

The youth hostel association of NZ is one of the largest accommodation providers for budget conscious travellers in NZ and have set sustainability as a guiding principle for the entire organisation.  Their efforts to integrate economic, environmental and social sustainability have been exemplary and they are willing to take calculated risks to trial new or innovative ideas that have the potential to enhance their sustainability ambitions.  I have been working closely with YHA Wellington which is an exemplar of the broader YHA NZ network.

Whale Watch Kaikoura An inspirational Maori owned and Maori operated tourism business that carefully balances the need for environmental and economic sustainability with a strong commitment to social and cultural sustainability. Both Maori cultural interpretation and environmental protection are core principles of this whale watching business.

Learn more about how Christian Schott is bringing technology into the classroom to teach sustainability.

This post was originally published on the UNPRME’s Primitime blog.

Collaborating across borders – The CR3+ Network

PRME La Trobe Business School

By Giselle Weybrecht

La Trobe Business School in Australia has been a PRME signatory since 2008 and an active PRME Champion. They joined forces with several other PRME Signatories to create CR3+ Network. Together the network provides a supportive platform to build international collaboration and enables the participant business schools to work with the PRME and build international and national capacity in Responsible Management Education. I spoke with Associate Professor Suzanne Young, Head of Department and Dr Swati Nagpal, Department of Management and Marketing, from La Trobe Business School, about their participation in this network.

What is the CR3+ Network and how did it come about?

La Trobe Business School has been working with ISAE (Brazil), Audencia Nantes School of Management (France) and Hanken School of Economics (Finland) since 2008 in an effort to exchange ideas, pedagogy, curriculum and research in the area of corporate responsibility. Head of LBS, Professor Paul Mather wrote: “With the support of the Principles for Responsible Executive Education, the CR3+ network’s objective is to promote a debate, inspire changes and propose solutions for challenges related to sustainability and governance, interacting and reaching what UNESCO calls ‘The 5th Pillar of Education: Learning to change and to change society.’”

What are the key features of the programme?

A key outcome of the partnership has been the hosting of an annual CR3+ conference, which has been held at each of the member institutions. Past themes have included governance and sustainability; CSR: expanding horizons, and the power of responsibility. The aim of the CR3+ conferences is to strengthen the partnership and dialogue around sustainability and responsibility, and provide a forum where ideas, developments and concerns in regards to these issues and the work of the PRME can be brought forward.

How is CR3+ different than other similar networks you are part of? How did you meet these specific schools and decide to create a network? 

It involves four schools that are strongly committed to PRME, and which later became PRME Champions, so PRME is very much at the core of CR3+. The network has been driven by the will to learn from each other, bearing in mind that the four schools are from very different and distant parts of the world (Australia, Brazil, Finland and France). From a very early point the core idea was to create a platform for these learning possibilities by organizing a conference involving all 3 (later 4) schools.

What have been some of the challenges? 

The schools are different and distant, not only in geographical terms but also in cultural and institutional terms. Creating special exchanges for students, for example, has faced a number of practical challenges related to differences in terms of tuition fees, types of study programmes, periods of studies, accreditations, etc. Different expectations about the conference have also caused some challenges but overall the learning opportunities and outcomes have far outweighed the challenges.

Successes? 

We have now done one full round of CR3+ conferences (in all 4 schools) and are about to start a second cycle. The mobilization from the different schools has been on the rise – for example, ISAE/FGV researchers have sent many abstracts to the CR3+ conference to be organized in Helsinki – and there has been growing integration between CR3+ events and PRME chapters – the conference in Helsinki will also be tied to a doctoral course organized by the PRME Chapter Nordic (more specifically Hanken, Stockholm School of Economics, BI Norwegian School of Management and CBS).

The CR3+ network has also enabled joint research projects and resulting publications as well as student and staff exchanges.

In autumn 2011, LBS hosted a masters-level exchange student from Hanken to work on a community development project.  Similar student exchanges are currently being planned for LBS students to have the opportunity to extend PRME –related projects at the other CR3+ partner universities.

In 2015, a collaboration between LBS and ISAE tested a new approach to ‘Promoting internationalisation and cross-cultural competency through online collaboration’, which provided opportunities for LBS MBA students to engage in an academic cross-cultural experience with Masters students from ISAE.  The students replicated real-world global communication, by collaborating virtually with people from a different cultural background in real time and jointly solving a series of management problems using online software.

What advice would you have for other schools thinking of putting something similar into place?

The network’s success is due to the relationships between key academic staff in each of the business schools and is also based in their common belief in and focus on the goals of the PRME mission. Members of the network were all early adopters of the PRME and champions of change in their respective institutions. Each School brings to the network their own expertise and demonstrates the national differences in Responsibility and Sustainability initiatives that are seen in academia, industry and government.

Each of the business schools have supported the CR3+ network as they acknowledge that working collaboratively provides greater opportunities for staff and students than working alone. Benefits in research, teaching, partnerships and dialogue have been demonstrated and the parties remain excited about opportunities that are coming from working with others in the new SDG project

What’s next for the initiative?

A pilot project is currently being led by LBS with support from the CR3+ network focused on facilitating a series of national workshops in each country between PRME higher education business schools and members of the UN Global Compact Network to present and interact on the theme of the SDGs. The outcomes of the workshops will be improved dialogue and networks between universities and other sectors, and the initiating of joint projects on the SDGs.

The 5th CR3+ conference will be held at Hanken School of Economics in Helsinki on 28-29 April 2017. The theme of the conference is ‘Making Corporate Responsibility Useful’, where the dominant logic of the ‘business case’ argument for CSR, and the legitimising effect this has on business engagement in CSR, will be brought into question.

This post was originally published on the UNPRME’s Primitime blog.

La Trobe Business School’s 2016 UN PRME Report released

PRME La Trobe Business School

The United Nations’ PRME secretariat has recently released the third sharing of progress (SIP) report submitted by La Trobe Business School. In the document, LBS details the achievements that illustrate its ongoing commitment to each of the six  Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME), developed further since the last report was submitted in 2014. This work makes a significant contribution to the ways in which LBS fulfils its mission.

The report can be viewed here.

What does PRME stand for?

The six PRME principles provide a framework for business schools as they seek to develop competent and responsible managers through education. The program was conceived by way of a recommendation of the academic stakeholders from the United Nations Global Compact. The six principles were developed and adopted in 2007 by an international task force of sixty deans, university presidents and official representatives of leading business schools and academic institutions.

The PRME philosophy sits alongside the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), formally adopted in Paris in 2015, as part of the universal, integrated and transformative 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The 17 SDGs balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: the economic, social and environmental. The Goals and targets provide a framework to stimulate action over the next 14 years in areas of critical importance for the long-term sustainability of human society and the planet, build on the Millennium Development Goals (MGDs) and complete what the MDGs were unable to achieve.

LBS’s commitment to the UN PRME

Since joining UN PRME in 2007, La Trobe Business School has been actively engaged in embedding responsible management, not just in its curriculum and research activities, but also at an institutional level. The School has laid the foundations for the next phase to expand its activities through dialogue (the sixth principle). This success to date means that LBS can more effectively engage in dialogue with stakeholders, and share its understandings more broadly.

La Trobe University values its Business School’s capacity and the opportunity to engage with the demands of responsible management education. LBS and the University have a longstanding commitment and philosophy to foster new generations of responsible professionals. La Trobe Business School aims to educate and encourage students to carry responsible management into their workplace along with a thorough understanding of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

LBS also continues to take the requisite steps to ensure that undergraduate and postgraduate courses, research programs and activities, strategic frameworks and its overall philosophy provide enabling environments for meeting the principles and the accompanying demands of educating about responsible leadership. This includes teaching current perspectives in corporate social responsibility, corporate governance, business ethics, gender balance, diversity, sustainability accounting, and environmental and resource economics across many of the LBS courses and subjects. In addition, the assessment modules are consistently reviewed and designed to emphasise these values to students and provide them with practical applications of responsible management.

New initiatives taken by LBS

Since 2014, many exciting new developments have taken place within La Trobe Business School that further contribute to its work around responsible management. The creation of the Yunus Social Business Centre, the SAS Analytics Innovation lab and the appointment of 11 Professors of Practice to the Business School stand as flagship achievements between 2014 and 2016.

The Sustainability Thinking, Global Citizenship, and Innovation and Entrepreneurship Learning Essentials of LTU provide an excellent platform to further support, grow and direct LBS students to recognize the global contexts in which they will work, exchange values and perspectives, act across cultures and borders and to work with, and within, diverse communities.

Since mid-2015, more than 2000 undergraduate students have completed La Trobe Business School’s second year Sustainability subject, one of three Learning Essentials for the School and the University. Within the MBA Program, LBS offers core subjects that engage with PRME. The University is also leading in the creation of innovative learning and research environments for students through the Hallmark Program and industry outreach including partnerships with local government, and in the community. The University also provides greater access to tertiary education through scholarship programs and the early entry Aspire program.

A number of LBS academics from a wide range of disciplines continue to undertake research projects that are closely aligned with the PRME principles.  These include projects related to sport and social impact, the role of technology in supporting the wellbeing and sustainability of human society, climate change impacts on business, accounting and human rights, rural tourism and sustainability, and data analytics for improved healthcare outcomes.

LBS will continue to use this research platform to create new, and build on existing, engagement opportunities with external stakeholders and partners such as sporting organisations, government agencies and departments, accreditation bodies, NGO’s, private sector organisations and consultancies.

Finally, La Trobe Business School is proud to be nominated as one of 30 leading institutions from around the world to participate in the pilot phase of the PRME Champions Group.

Professors of Practice Profiles – Janet Russell: “The mix of experience in our Professor of Practice team is outstanding and complementary to the LBS faculty, in total providing an invaluable resource to our students.”

Janet Russell

When La Trobe Business School introduced the Professors of Practice concept early last year, Janet Russell was one of the first Professors of Practice to be appointed.

As one of the first Business Schools in Australia to pioneer this concept, LBS intends that Professors of Practice will provide students with invaluable insights into the industry, while also  strengthening links between LBS and industry.

With experience spanning from being a CEO and Managing Director to running her own executive coaching service for successful entrepreneurs, tech specialists, lawyers and accountants, Janet Russell has an impressive breadth of experience to bring to La Trobe Business School. ”As an executive coach, I aim to help clients identify the thoughts and behaviours that can hold them back in their careers or leadership roles so they can grow conscious of these and develop new ways of thinking and behaving that serve them and their organisations much better,” she says. “The key in my work as an executive coach is to ask the right questions to unlock what the real or underlying issue is for an individual. For example, I’ll often deal with clients who have been promoted on the basis of research they conducted, but they feel unequipped for their new position because they are insecure about their managerial or people skills. By asking the right questions, you can support an individual to deal with the often irrational fears that hold them back from realising their own potential.”

Currently, Janet Russell teaches on La Trobe Business School’s MBA programme, where she delivers subjects on Responsible Leadership, HR and Management. “I really enjoy teaching especially as my professional experience and knowledge are well aligned with La Trobe Business School’s values and goals, like creating work-ready graduates and fostering global citizens.” Janet says. “I was also very pleased to see that our Business School was named one of the only PRME champions in Australia recently. A strong focus on sustainability and developing responsible leaders is crucial for organisations globally.”

In November last year, Janet travelled to Hanoi, Vietnam, where she taught an intensive course on responsible leadership to twenty MBA students. “It was a wonderful experience to compare and contrast the learning environment of our Hanoi based students with our Australian based students.

When asked what she thinks a Professor of Practice should bring to a course, Janet Russell is clear: “Relevant experience and practical application of how what’s studied in a business subject translates into the real world of work and organisational environments, which I think all Professors of Practice have in abundance. The mix of experience in our Professor of Practice team is outstanding and complementary to the LBS faculty, in total providing an invaluable resource to our students.”

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