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PRME Week at LBS – Using dialogue to build partnerships for sustainability

On the 24th and 25th of October, La Trobe Business School hosted a successful seventh CR3+ Conference. The theme this year was “Using dialogue to build partnerships for sustainability” and explored how partnerships can bring about sustainable solutions as we work together on progressing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). More than 60 people from more than 15 countries attended the conference. This blog summarises some of its highlights.

Prof Suzanne Young opening the CR3+ conference

Day 1

Prof Dennis McDermott, La Trobe University’s Pro Vice-Chancellor (Indigenous), was the first keynote speaker of the conference. Dennis talked about authenticity, partnership and change, and how indigenous knowledge can assist partnership building for the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The second keynote was delivered by Jillian Reid from Mercer. Jillian discussed the climate scenario analysis Mercer has developed, investing for positive impact and how the SDGs are used as a framework for responsible investment.

The panel discussion on the first day focused on multi-stakeholder partnerships for sustainability where we learned that partnerships are complex and that dialogue, trust, respect and being open minded are critical to advancing the partners’ individual objectives, and those of the partnership.

panel discussion focused on multi-stakeholder partnerships for sustainability

The day was wrapped up at Charcoal Lane – a Mission Australia social enterprise restaurant that provides guidance and opportunity to young Aboriginal people in need of a fresh start in life. The Executive Chef of Charcoal Lane, Greg Hampton, gave an insightful talk about the social development aspect of the restaurant, but also their menu and the origin of the food they use.

Day 2

The second day of the CR3+ Conference was off to a good start with a keynote from Dr Leeora Black from Deloitte (and also LBS advisory board member) discussing the social aspects of sustainability, corporate social responsibility and particularly Australia’s Modern Slavery Act.

keynote from Dr Leeora Black from Deloitte

Later in the morning it was time to get creative with Lego SeriousPlay©. Dr Heather Stewart and Dr Rob Hales from Griffith University provided a workshop using Lego that focused on building relationships and collaboration with the aim of exploring the embedding of sustainable development goals in learning and teaching within business schools.

The last speaker on the second day was Dr Raghu Raman from Amrita University. Raghu introduced the university’s Live-in-Labs® – a program that breaks classroom and lab barriers by applying learned theory in real-world settings. It uses principles of lean research for the development and deployment of sustainable solutions for current challenges faced by rural communities in India.

After the conference

The day after the conference, the Australia New Zealand PRME Chapter meeting took place on the theme ‘Students as Partners’. The day was about sharing stories and learning from students about how universities can partner with them more effectively to co-create curriculum and extracurricular activities that advance knowledge about the SDGs. Eleven students from across Australia and New Zealand were in attendance and had the opportunity to ask academics what they are doing to advance Sustainable Development across the region.

Australia New Zealand PRME chapter meeting
Australia New Zealand PRME chapter meeting

Besides the Australia New Zealand PRME Chapter meeting, there was also a PRME Champions group meeting with representatives of 40 business schools from all continents. The meeting was co-hosted by La Trobe Business School and Deakin Business School.  This was the fourth and final meeting of the 2018-2019 Champions cycle, with a key outcome of the meetings being the development of a Blueprint for SDG integration across Business Schools in the areas of teaching, research and partnerships.  Once completed, the blueprint will be available to the 700+ Business School signatories worldwide.

PRME Champions group meeting

The week of PRME-related activities hosted by LBS demonstrate our continued commitment to be a Business School with purpose. This was showcased through the week’s focus on partnerships for sustainable development, highlighting the role of indigenous values and ‘ways of knowing’ in our approach to partnerships, and the wider academic community’s recognition of the student voice in our thinking about sustainability. Furthermore, through our international partnerships with the CR3+ network, PRME and the Champions Group, our staff and students had the opportunity to engage with a global network of academics who research and teach in sustainability, partnerships and CSR.

If you have any questions about the Business School’s involvement with the UN PRME or any of the events discussed in this blog, please contact Dr Swati Nagpal.

This blog is the last blog in the SDG Series, a series that focused on the 17 Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations, in the lead up to the CR3+ Conference.

More blogs in the SDG Series:

- An introduction to the Sustainable Development Goals
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 1
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 2
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 3
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 4
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 5
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 6
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 7
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 8
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 9
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 10
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 11
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 12
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 13
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 14
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 15
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 16
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 17

The CR3+ Conference is coming up!

The CR3+ Conference, hosted by La Trobe Business School, is just two weeks away. Where is this conference about? Why is this conference so important? What are some of the highlights?

What is CR3+?

Initially, Audencia Business School (France), Hanken School of Economics (Finland) and ISAE FGV (Brazil) decided to cooperate in their implementation of the United Nations’ Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME). This collaboration resulted in the joint organisation of an international conference on Corporate Responsibility, named CR3. When La Trobe Business School became a signatory of PRME, they joined CR3 and so CR3 became CR3+1. The aim of these four PRME champions is to exchange ideas, pedagogical processes, curriculum and research in the area of corporate responsibility.

2019 CR3+ Conference

On the 24th and 25th of October, LBS is hosting the seventh CR3+ Conference. The theme of the conference is Using dialogue to build partnerships for sustainability.

CR3+ logo - Using dialogue to build partnerships for sustainability

As we work towards building a more sustainable world we cannot work in isolation. Partnerships are necessary to ensure long term success. However, the partnership model may be problematic, with issues arising such as co-option and abuse of power. Differences between actors can also lengthen the journey and make the measure of success difficult to determine. Hence, this conference explores how partnerships can bring about sustainable solutions as we work together on progressing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

LBS has arranged a fantastic line-up of keynote speakers, panel discussants and other presenters.

Keynotes

Professor Dennis McDermott, La Trobe University Pro Vice-Chancellor (Indigenous), will be giving an academic keynote on partnerships, with a focus on the role of indigenous values in framing our understanding and implementation of partherships.

Jillian Reid, Principal in the Responsible Investment Team at Mercer, will talk about investing in a time of climate change, the growth in sustainability themed opportunities, and the role of the sustainable development goals in investment decision-making. 

Dr Leeora Black, Principal Risk Advisory at Deloitte Australia, is an expert on the Modern Slavery Act, and she will be speaking about new and different kinds of partnerships that are being driven by the Act.

Workshops

The workshop Exploring challenges and priorities of embedding SDGs in business schools using Lego SeriousPlay© is an interactive, action-based workshop facilitated by Heather Stewart and Rob Hales from Griffith Business School. This collaborative style of working on individual and group levels is proven to extend ideas, views and often break down assumptions in a safe and non-judgemental environment. The aim of the workshop is to develop new skills in resilience, creativity and lateral thinking in order to employ and establish sustainability within business schools.

Prof. Nava Subramaniam from RMIT and Dr. Raghu Raman from Amrita University are facilitating the workshop Amrita Live-In-Labs, which introduces Live-in-Labs® – a multidisciplinary experiential learning program that breaks down classroom and lab barriers by applying learned theory in real-world settings. This credit-based academic program draws on principles of lean research for the development and deployment of sustainable solutions for current challenges faced by rural communities in India. By directly living in rural communities (labs) and co-designing solutions to development challenges, program participants gain first-hand knowledge and know-how of identifying and assessing community needs and subsequently developing and implementing viable solutions through various participatory methods.

#CR3LTU

LBS will be using #CR3LTU on Twitter to keep you updated on speakers, presentations and other great conference moments. Join in and share your views and best moments of the conference too!

Our Partners

La Trobe Business School recognises and appreciates the support of its PRME partners and Mercer and Lifeskills in the delivery of this exciting event.  

We’re looking forward to welcome you to the conference!

1Inspirational Guide for the Implementation of PRME: Placing Sustainability at the heart of management education (2017). Edited by Principles for Responsible Management Education. New York: Routledge.  

What is it like to teach at one of LTU’s partnership universities?

Last year, La Trobe Business School and the Singapore Institute of Management (SIM) launched their partnership that includes Top Up programs for the Bachelor of Business (Tourism and Hospitality) and Bachelor of Business (Event Management) in Singapore. Students with an accredited diploma or advanced diploma are given 12 subjects advanced standing, which requires a further 12 subjects to Top Up their qualification to a degree awarded by La Trobe University.

Recently, several LBS teaching staff went to Singapore to deliver a variety of subjects as part of the program. LBS Newsroom caught up with some of them and asked them about their experience.

Jess Derham

Principles of Gastronomy (THS2GSY) and Food & Beverage Supervision (THS1FBS)

Both subjects I taught are practical subjects providing lots of interactive activities. Some of the highlights of the subjects included students designing their own menu’s through to showcasing destinations around the world in a live exhibition. We were also fortunate enough to have a very unique dining experience at Nox Dine In the Dark – a multi-sensory experience where you dine in complete darkness and are served by people who have a vision impairment.

My students were nothing short of amazing! Personally, the experience of teaching overseas allowed me to step out of my comfort zone and test my teaching skills to an international audience. Right from the preparation stage, to navigating a new university in another country, through to forming a bond with my students. It stands to be one of the most rewarding opportunities I have been provided with.

Jess and her class of students at SIM - an LTU partnership university
Jess and her class of students

Greg Dingle

Event Project (THS3SCE) and Volunteer Management (MGT3SVM)

Teaching at SIM was a great experience! It was challenging to teach two subjects that I had never taught before and both in the same week, but it was a very rewarding experience and I highly recommend it to other colleagues in LBS. I was also very fortunate to be part of a teaching team. Teaching is a collegial endeavour and my colleagues were fun to be with as well as to work with. The “Dine in the Dark” experience was also a really unique experience (thanks to Jess for making this possible).

The students were engaged and enthusiastic and I really enjoyed the week with them. They had a sense of humour too which I liked. I Singaporean-“ised” their content as much as possible (e.g. case studies, organisations, assessment examples, etc.) and I think they appreciated that. Walking in the Botanic Gardens at dawn on some mornings before work was also something I really loved. It’s a fantastic space and gave me some insights into how Singaporeans go about their daily lives. I was invited to join a Zumba class at the Gardens one morning, so it really is full of surprises…

Greg and his class of students at SIM - an LTU partnership university
Greg and his class of students

Paul Strickland

Computer Reservation Systems (THS2TCR) and Tourism & Hospitality Simulation (THS3THS)

In the subject Computer Reservation Systems, we teach students the Opera Hotel Property Management System. Being in computer labs, students have a difference experience to lectures and blended learning environments because the labs are designed for students to be self-taught with the tutor just facilitating the functionality of the software.

Teaching in Singapore is very rewarding. Students are very disciplined especially students that have completed national service. They also were very enthusiastic about the reservation system and managed well to work both autonomously and in teams in HOTS. I also really liked all the different types of food the students brought to class and had me try.

Some of Paul's students in the computer lab at SIM - an LTU partnership university
Some of Paul’s students in the computer lab

Anne Brouwer

Sustainability (BUS2SBY) and Social Media and Relationship Marketing (MKT3SRM)

In 2018 I was at the Dalian Jiaotong University in China for two weeks to deliver an LBS subject and absolutely loved the experience, so I didn’t have to think twice when I was asked to teach at the Singapore Institute of Management. It was a very intense week. I was new to both subjects, had to teach 6 hours a day and there is obviously a lot of preparation and administration work involved. But it was so worth it!

Even though the students were not used to the interactive way of teaching that we do at LTU (blended learning) they seemed to really enjoy it and got really excited over their in-class group work. There is just something about teaching in a different country, with a different culture and a different language. Ultimately, I think I learn as much from them, as they do from me.

Anne and her class of students at SIM - an LTU partnership university
Anne and her class of students
Read more about our SIM partnership: 
LBS’ new partnership with the Singapore Institute of Management

LBS recognises outstanding youth in local business

For a number of years, LBS has been sponsoring the Young Business Achiever Awards as part of the Northern Business Achievement Awards (NBAAs).

The Young Business Achiever Awards identify businesses and leaders in their fields that have made a major contribution to the economy, community and development of employment skills for the next generation in Melbourne’s northern region.

What are the NBAAs?

The NBAAs occur through a partnership of industry, education, local and state government and decision makers across Melbourne’s north, including the local government areas of Banyule, Darebin, Hume, Moreland, Nillumbik and Whittlesea. The awards recognise the business achievements of small and medium-sized enterprises and encourage business excellence, growth and competitiveness. The NBAAs are managed by NORTH Link, a regional partnership of industry, education and government, and partner of La Trobe University

Young Business Achievers Awards

LBS sponsorship of the Young Business Achiever Awards is part of our ongoing commitment to the local community, and local youth in particular. The Awards recognise the achievements of young people (25 years or under) working in local businesses who display an outstanding attitude, endeavour and contribution to their company and fellow employees.

LBS sponsorship of the Young Business Achiever Awards aims to develop and strengthen the links between businesses, the local community and the School. The LBS mission is to improve the education standards of the business leaders of tomorrow, and to up-skill today’s business leaders to help them better navigate the challenges and opportunities associated with business disruption. So we are delighted to partner with NORTH Link in these awards that recognise local business excellence and innovation.

Professor Jane Hamilton (Dean and Head of the La Trobe Business School)

Recipients 2019

The awards are presented during the quarterly NBAA breakfasts, where recipients receive a certificate and small prize in recognition of their achievement. There have been two NBAA breakfasts in 2019 with four Young Business Achiever Awards recipients: Shima Rahmatizadeh, Ellie Dunstan, Ella Brothers and Sharnie Robinson. The awards were presented by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School.

Shima Rahmatizadeh received her award for establishing EngJunior. Shima has just completed a PhD in Engineering, with a focus on geographical information systems. Shima worked and studied mostly with men, and her dream has been to encourage more women into engineering and science. So she established her own initiative, EngJunior, which brings engineering and science into the classroom and aftercare, showing primary age children how much fun engineering can be. Shima introduces practical activities where children learn and apply the concepts of engineering. It’s enjoyable, educational and a great way to encourage more girls into the career that Shima is so passionate about.

Young Business Achiever Awards: Shima Rahmatizadeh
Shima Rahmatizadeh

Ellie Dunstan received the award for her company Dress Hire AU, founded in 2015. The company supplies Australian women with an affordable alternative to wearing a new outfit for each event. Dress Hire AU services women Australia wide via a delivery service and was one of the first Australian dress hire businesses to automate through a website and booking app. Shoppers can also visit the Eltham warehouse to try on and walk away with a valuable garment at a fraction of the price.

Young Business Achiever Awards: Ellie Dunstan
Ellie Dunstan

Ella Brothers received her award for her outstanding work as Dispatch Officer at Combo, a provider of business IT solutions. Ella has great quality customer service skills, with a focus on the professional technical services that Combo delivers and ensures that customers get the right tech on their doorstep at the right time.

Young Business Achiever Awards: Ella Brothers
Ella Brothers

Sharnie Robinson received her award for her longstanding contribution to Ferguson Plarre, a family owned and operated bakery business. Sharnie’s first job, at the age of 15, was with Ferguson Plarre and she worked her way up from washing dishes to managing the shop in Mernda during Year 12. From there she managed the shop for two years before she became a business partner and opened her own store. Within 18 months of opening, the store won an award for excellence in retail and Sharnie was nominated for the Telstra Small Businesswoman of the Year award.

Young Business Achiever Awards: Sharnie Robinson
Sharnie Robinson

LBS congratulates all these young business achievers on their awards!

LBS’ new partnership with the Singapore Institute of Management

Recently, La Trobe Business School and the Singapore Institute of Management (SIM) launched their new partnership for Bachelor of Business (Tourism and Hospitality) and Bachelor of Business (Event Management) Top Up programs in Singapore. Students with an accredited diploma or advanced diploma are given 12 subjects advanced standing, which requires a further 12 subjects to Top Up their qualification to a degree awarded by La Trobe University.

Some students of the first intake

The Bachelor of Business (Tourism and Hospitality) provides students with the skills needed for hospitality and tourism supervision with business management skills and an understanding of the dynamics of the tourism industry. The Bachelor of Business (Event Management) is designed to produce future leaders for the special events sector. It emphasises the application of theoretical knowledge and practical skills needed for the effective management of events.

The subjects are being taught by both LBS lecturers and SIM lecturers in intensive block mode, online, face-to-face and blended learning.

Paul Strickland, Programme Director of the Bachelor of Business (Tourism & Hospitality) said:

“The course has embedded the fundamentals of business plus tourism and hospitality subjects that prepare students for all aspects of the sectors. Students can then choose which direction they would like to pursue as there are no limits”.

Additionally, for the Bachelor of Business (Event Management), Paul stated:

“Working in the events sector leads to working in a variety of jobs including events management, human resourcing and volunteering. Students are prepared for managerial roles to oversee small community-based events and festivals but also large-scale mega-events”.

Two student intakes per year in both Top Up programs will occur in January and July from 2020.

Dining in the Dark during Orientation

LBS alumnus and MCFC leader talks about what makes a successful team

What does it take to guide an elite football team to win their record-breaking third championship title?

Former professional women’s soccer player and La Trobe Business School alumnus, Louisa Bisby, takes us behind the scenes in her role as W-League team manager at Melbourne City Football Club (MCFC).

 

 

Team manager versus coach

My position as a team manager is very different to that of a coach, because I don’t assess on-field performance and select the team. Instead, my role and responsibility is to offer individual off-field support to team members and ensure all football operations run smoothly. This starts from the moment a player signs with MCFC, throughout the season and to the end of their time with the club. It involves organising player registrations, transfer papers, flights, accommodation, transport, education assistance, post-football ambitions and any administration.

Logistically, it’s my responsibility to ensure that the players, coaches and support staff have all that they require to service the team to their best ability.

The most enjoyable part of my job is the variety of tasks. It’s everything from helping on-pitch, to organising equipment and kit; to off-field football operations and MCFC activations, such as coordinating player appearances. I communicate with a diverse group of external organisations, from governing bodies (like Football Federation Australia, International Football Federations such as the National Women’s Soccer League in the US, ASADA, and other W-League clubs), to community clubs, hotels, transport companies and travel agencies. The role’s diversity gives me a better understanding of the football landscape, players’ needs as individuals and their goals for life after football.

Often, I’ll be the first person a new player will see at the airport when they arrive from overseas or interstate. This means my initial interaction with them can potentially determine their first impression of the club. Should they stay, it’s then my role to make sure that they know MCFC provides support off-field and that they can approach me with any matter of concern.

As team manager, you need the ability to create a professional bond with everyone, on and off the field.

 

A team of differences

There’s many different personalities, cultures and age groups within a team. No one person is the same. Each player comes with a different story, upbringing and set of experiences. Within the A-League team, the youngest player is aged 17 and the oldest is in their 30s, so their levels of knowledge and life experience can vary.

As a previous player in the Australian W-League and Matildas representing Australia, I used to play with, and against, some of the MCFC W-League team, which also helps build trust. Due to having seen me play and what I have achieved, players feel confident that I understand the game and what it takes to reach the highest level.

A big part of creating a bond is the trust and the confidence that someone has to come and talk to you, whether it’s positive or negative. You need to be able to guide players in the right direction, ensure your choice of words is appropriate and, if needed, send a player to someone who is qualified to give the right advice.

Committing to a common goal is what leads a sporting team to success. Players and staff must be dedicated to supporting one another on and off-field to win a title. Collectively, people need to ensure that everything is in place throughout the journey for players to succeed. It’s not just about the football operations, but the professionalism to help players come into an environment that’s easy, where they can walk in, get changed, and know what they’re doing at all times.

It’s known that if there’s something else in an athlete’s life, they’re more successful, because good sport/life balance gives them another focus away from elite competition and the pressure to perform. It is my goal to get players studying or doing something else other than playing football.

 

Studying at LTU

Completing a Bachelor of Business (Sport Management) at La Trobe was beneficial for my career. It gave me insight into how the sports industry worked, how policies and procedures were implemented and also accounting and budgeting. It helped me establish my organisational skills and see the importance of communication with a variety of people from all aspects of life. As part of the course, I did a practical placement at VicSport, which supplemented the theory I’d learned.

Having studied at La Trobe, I can say it’s one of the best sports universities in Australia.

It’s a very supportive, athlete-friendly university. My lecturers were easy to talk to and very understanding of my football career. It’s not just the course content that allows you to gain career opportunities, it’s also advice from the lecturers when you need it and a professional network. The teachers have a lot of contacts within the sports industry. Since graduating, I’ve maintained relationships with lecturers like Professor Russell Hoye and Dr Pam Kappelides. They’re always willing to have a conversation and ask me how I am.

My advice is to gain as much experience as you can while you’re at university. At university, I knuckled down, studied hard for three years, made networks and did some volunteering. I helped out with couple of local football clubs and volunteered at events like triathlon and rugby. Even if it’s not a sporting event, you’re still going to learn something, there are always logistics behind it. It’s about challenging yourself – the more experience you have, the higher your chance of getting a job.

 

La Trobe University and A-League soccer team the Melbourne City Football Club have been proud partners since the club’s inception in 2009

 

My first job was as Game Development Officer for the former Melbourne Heart Football Club, which put my uni degree to good use in the workplace. In this role, I organised, planned and managed festival clinics and community events in suburban and regional areas, schools, local community centres and football clubs. The work also involved match day activations, including small-sided games at half time, football clinics and mascots (5-12-year-olds that walked out with players before the match).

When I got the job at Melbourne Heart FC, they didn’t only just ask the references on my resume, they also rang different coaches and spoke to my lecturers to find further information about me.

It’s a big industry with tight networks. Your sporting achievements and behaviour, along with your professional reputation, definitely contribute. You need to behave in a manner that will assist you with potential future work, regardless of whether you’re an elite athlete or not.

 

This blog post was originally published on NEST. Read the original article.

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