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LBS’s Dr Tarek Rana delivers interactive workshop to local businesses in Moreland City Council

Recently, La Trobe Business School’s Dr Tarek Rana delivered an interactive workshop to local businesses as part of an industry engagement initiative between Moreland City Council and La Trobe Business School.

The budgeting and cash flow workshop aimed to help local business owners and managers with:

  • Setting and managing financial budget
  • Improving cash flow and profits of their businesses
  • Identify key business and financial tools

Dr Tarek Rana’s workshop showed how a business can improve its financial outcomes by linking budget with the business strategies. The workshop was focused on refining the way owners manage budget and cash flow by identifying organisational objectives and developing short-term goals and long-term strategies. Dr Rana has discussed many steps a business owner or manager can do at minimal cost to improve, measure and assess performance, re-evaluate objectives, goals, strategies through budgeting and cash flow management.

These workshops are also an important way in which LBS is strengthening its relationships with local industry and the business community.

Dr Tarek Rana

Dr Tarek Rana is La Trobe Business School Academic Coordinator for Albury-Wodonga Campus and a Lecturer in Management Accounting with La Trobe Business School. Prior to becoming an academic, Tarek was a Principal and senior manager of professional accounting firms in Sydney and Canberra. He has considerable practice experience in the areas of business services, taxation, auditing, and financial planning as well as consulting services including performance measurement and risk management.

Tarek has strong links with professional accounting bodies both in Australia and overseas. He is La Trobe University Albury-Wodonga liaison for CA ANZ, CPA Australia, and CIMA UK. He has served as an executive committee member of the CIMA Australia ACT Branch (July 2013 – June 2016), and now serving as a council member of CPA Australia Albury-Wodonga Branch (February 2017 – Present) and a branch committee member of the Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand Albury-Wodonga Group (August 2016 – Present).

The 5th CR3+ Conference on the theme of Making Corporate Responsibility Useful, cohosted by LBS, Hanken School of Economics (Helsinki Finland), Audencia Business School (Nantes, France) and ISAE/FGV (Curitiba, Brazil)

By Suzanne Young

Recently, Dr Suzanne Young and Dr Sajad Fayesi represented La Trobe Business School at the CR3+ Conference.

Within the overall conference theme of “Making Corporate Responsibility Useful”, a number of sub-themes where discussed including CSR and Global supply chains; CSR, human resource management and labour; Corporatization and CSR; Research and business education; ESG data; Social and human sustainability at work; and Sustainable development,

The CR3+ network has its roots in informal relationships in the early days of UN PRME, between three signatory business schools: Audencia (Nantes, France), ISAE/FGV (Curitiba, Brazil) and Hanken (Helsinki, Finland) –these are the “3” in CR3+. These three were soon joined by La Trobe Business School and at that stage we stopped counting our core partners – just adding the “+” for the infinite possibilities of future collaborations and partnerships. A simple equation with many possible solutions. That we are now in our 5th iteration of the conference is a strong testimony of the value of international collaboration especially in relation to the kind of challenges we are posed within the CR discourse and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Dr Sajad Fayesi and Dr Suzanne Young both presented papers and chaired streams at the conference.  Their papers are listed below:

Fayesi, S,

Tensions in Procurement Sustainability: An Exploratory Study

Nagpal, S., Young, S., Marjoribanks, T. and Durden G.,

CSR and Social Risk: From Risk Minimization to Risk Sharing

Young, S., Markey, R., McIvor, J. and Wright, C. F.,

Labour, Climate Change adaptation and the Education Sector

Young, S., Marais, M. Marjoribanks, T., Durden, G. and Douyen, R.,

ESG Risk Reporting in Australia and France: An Institutional Analysis

A link to the 2017 Conference papers can be found here.

In addition Suzanne was a panelist on the all-conference UN PRME themed discussion which focused on the role of the PRME in transforming society, business and education and the role of the UN SDGs in each country and in the respective business schools.

Australia ranks 20th globally in meeting the SDGs. It has one of the highest carbon emissions per person, rates poorly on clean energy and climate change goals, environment goals, with high levels of solid waste and land clearing and loss of biodiversity. It also exhibits high rates of obesity. However it rates highly on lack of poverty, education and water quality, and equality.

Academic institutions can contribute much to the achievement of the SDGs, for example, through incorporating the SDGs into curriculum and focusing research efforts on SDG related challenges, raising awareness of the SDGs, and taking up the opportunities the framework offers for building collaborative projects with other sectors.

Today the CR3+ Network is working collaboratively on a project as one of the United Nations Champion Business Schools in the Principles of Responsible Business Education (PRME). The project entails conducting workshops in regional Australia on the Sustainable Development Goals with members from the PRME higher educational business schools, members of the UN Global Compact, businesses, NGOs and government to present and interact on the theme of the SDGs. The outcomes of the workshops will be improved dialogue and networks, and the initiating of joint projects on the SDGs. If you would like further information or to participate in these workshops please contact Dr Suzanne Young.

The 6th CR3+ Conference will be held in Nantes France at the Audencia Business School in 2018.

 

Online MBA is Australia’s best

La Trobe University’s online Master of Business Administration has been rated the best in Australia by the United Kingdom’s CEO Magazine.

La Trobe’s online MBA was ranked number nine in the world in the widely-respected magazine’s 2017 Global MBA Rankings.

“We are delighted to see La Trobe’s Online MBA program getting the recognition that it rightly deserves,” said Dr Andrew O’Loughlin, the MBA Director at La Trobe University. “The MBA team have worked extremely hard and it is testament to their commitment and hard work that such a new program has been recognised.”

CEO Magazine uses a ranking system entirely geared and weighted to fact-based criteria which, it says, ‘cuts through the noise and provides potential students with a performance benchmark’.

La Trobe’s online MBA can be completed within 12 months from anywhere in the world.

“Our subjects are carefully and specifically designed to facilitate online learning,” said Dr Susan Keller, the MBA Deputy Director at La Trobe. “We do recognise that online learning requires a different style of engagement.

“We have excellent facilitators with industry experience. Live interactive sessions each week add to the richness of the educational experience.”

The recognition for the online MBA from the magazine follows hot on the heels of it featuring in the QS World University Rankings for the first time.

Further to these rankings, La Trobe’s online MBA offers two additional educational experiences. “Our Capstone Boardroom Simulation provides an opportunity for students to illustrate learning in a ‘real-life’ boardroom situation. It is designed to challenge, stretch and validate the students’ learning experience,” said Dr Keller. “While our MBA Career Development Portfolio, facilitated by an industry career consultant, helps students develop and profile their career and leadership skills.”

Details of La Trobe’s top-ranked online MBA are available here.

Simmons journey takes him from UAE to Vicsport

Randall2.jpg

Simmons is loving his role as the Events and Administration coordinator at Vicsport.

After living in the United Arab Emirates for most of his childhood, La Trobe Bachelor of Business (Sport Management) graduate Randall Simmons took a chance and moved to Australia’s heartland of sport to pursue a career in the industry.

“I selected La Trobe because of the quality of its Sport Management course, and the opportunity to learn about sport management in the capital of sport was hard to pass up on.”

Gaining expertise with organisations such as Melbourne City Football Club, Carlton Football Club, the Victorian Olympic Council and the North Melbourne Football Club, Simmons made an immediate impact.

Simmons performed duties in a number of roles and across various departments including hospitality, delivering community programs and volunteer training.

“When I moved to Melbourne, I made a conscious decision to get as much sport experience as possible before I graduated.”

“By volunteering in these organisations I was able to gain the experience which most organisations in sport look for and this helped me land a full time role.”

“Sporting organisations look to employ people who have worked in the industry, volunteering is a big box to tick.”

20160603_CFC_LATROBE_UNI_03.jpg
Randall completed placement at the Carlton Football Club as part of the Sport Management practicum.

The skills Randall gained in these positions assisted him to secure employment as the Events and Administration coordinator at VicSport immediately after his degree.

The La Trobe graduate was among a wave of applicants for the position, including many from the same graduating cohort as his own.  Upon reflection, Randall says it was his volunteering, internships and tailored course work that set him apart from the rest.

“The Bachelor of Business (Sport Management) degree was designed to give us real world experience of what is happening in the industry.”

“From Sport Marketing to Sport Governance, I have been able to take certain aspects from all my subjects and apply it to my role and in my organisation.”

LTU Volunteer 2
Randall’s performed duties across a number of departments while volunteering at the Melbourne City Football Club.

By studying a Bachelor of Business (Sport Management), you could work with La Trobe’s network of sporting partners such as the Carlton Football Club, Melbourne Rebels and Melbourne City Football Club.

This post was originally published on the La Trobe University Intern Diaries Blog.

Epping Secondary College VCE Business Forum at La Trobe Business School

By Erin Basinski

On Friday 17th February the Year 10 VCE and Year 11 Business Management Students from Epping Secondary College were invited to La Trobe University to take part in the 2017 VCE Business Forum.

The day began in the Szental Lecture Theatre where our students joined other VCE students from Lalor Secondary College, Macleod College and St Helena Secondary College. We were introduced to our first keynote speaker, Professor of Practice in Entrepreneurship Mr Antony Jacobson, who teaches at La Trobe Business School. The main focus of Mr Jacobson’s talk centered on the theme: “Focus on what you can do, not what you can’t do!” It was inspiring to hear his personal success stories. We were in awe when we discovered that Antony set up his first national franchise when he was only 17 years of age and still a student in Year 11. He spoke about the importance of a positive mindset particularly if we want to be successful in the future. “Be passionate, excite, and use passion in all that you do. Set the bar high. Never low, never in the middle, but high.” Professor of Practice Antony Jacobson said.

The rest of the day was then broken into three sessions. Our first session was with Roman Peretiako who is an associate Lecturer of Marketing at La Trobe Business School. We had the opportunity to discuss topics such as; what is Marketing, Market Segmentation and Target Markets. We were given the opportunity to come up with our own business concept and we were asked to consider the Marketing Mix:

  • PRODUCT – style, features, quality, brand
  • PRICE – How much should a business charge to recover the costs of marketing
  •  PLACE – How does a consumer obtain the product, physical retailer, online, factory outlet?
  • PROMOTION – What methods can be used to get a consumer’s attention, interest and desire?

Our second session was with Simon Crone who is the Manager of Content Development Programs at Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand. Mr Crone presented an interesting look at accounting and spoke about the importance of budgeting in the world of business. He too shared personal stories from his own career which demonstrated a strong personal commitment to the local community.

Our final session for the day was with Professor of Practice in Management Janet Rusell, at La Trobe Business School. In this workshop we had an opportunity to take a closer look at the iconic Australian juice brand, “Boost”. The main focus of this workshop was to think about a business concept, its development and its structure. We spoke about the sources of finance to help establish a start-up business, business locations and external factors that businesses need to consider when writing up a business plan.

Overall it was an enjoyable day which allowed us to see the bigger picture as to what our subject Business Management will cover this year. It was exciting to think that this year we will be given the opportunity to formulate our own business ideas and create a business plan with the hope to run our own business later on in the year.

Thank you to Ms Kanisiadis, Ms Hooper and Mrs Clark for organising and attending on the day.

MBA student Travis Lovett wins the Institute of Public Administration Australian (Victoria Division) Young Indigenous Leader Scholarship.

By Geraldine Kennett

Travis Lovett completed his Graduate Diploma in Management (Public Sector) in 2016 and is currently undertaking an MBA with La Trobe Business School (LBS).
Travis joined the Victorian Public Service in 2008, following experience working with Aboriginal community organisations including the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO).

His first public service role was with the Department of Justice in the Koori Justice Unit where he was instrumental in boosting the Aboriginal workforce of the justice department. In 2012, he was appointed Manager of the Koori Courts in Court Services Victoria where he had policy leadership and oversight of the operation of the Koori Courts.

Travis’s attainment of his LBS Graduate Diploma in Management (Public Sector) supported his appointment to a senior executive role in 2016 with the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning where he assists in developing Water for Victoria, the government’s new long-term direction for managing Victoria’s precious water resources. The Water Plan recognises the values that water has for Traditional Owners and Aboriginal Victorians, and commits the water sector to support Aboriginal participation in Victorian water planning and management frameworks through consultative structures that address the rights and interests of Victoria’s Traditional Owners. Travis is playing a key role in ensuring that the department’s engagement with Traditional Owners and Aboriginal communities supports the water plan’s objectives.

As Manager, Koori Courts, Travis demonstrated his ability to work collaboratively with a broad range of stakeholders to address a challenging set of issues. Travis’ ability to work with each stakeholder group ensures they have input into the design and operation of the initiative was a key part of the initiative’s success. An independent evaluation found that the Koori Court has better engagement within the justice system for Aboriginal Victorians, helping offenders to address the causes of their offending and helping prevent re-offending.

Travis has actively participated in a mentoring relationship with a senior executive, and provided strong professional and cultural support to other Indigenous and non-Indigenous staff. He has been identified as having strong executive potential in the Victorian Public Service. His personal and professional qualities demonstrate a willingness and potential to take full advantage of the professional development opportunities offered by the scholarship. Travis shows initiative in his work, and extends himself above and beyond his ‘position description’ to contribute to the organisations he works with – offering constructive ideas and following through. His ambition is matched by his potential. Travis’ further studies (Masters of Business Administration at La Trobe University, 2014-2017) demonstrate his intellectual capability, his curiosity, and his commitment to professional development.

La Trobe Business School Sport Management student Rebecca Privitelli ready to tackle on and off-field career

La Trobe Business School Sport Management student, Rebecca Privitelli, is rising to prominence throughout Melbourne’s Northern suburbs by cashing in on a huge month in women’s sport.

The 21 year old will be competing in the inaugural AFLW competition in 2017, after being selected by Carlton with pick 142 in the national draft on October 12th this year.

She rounded out her exciting month by being named the first ever head coach of the Northern Knights Football Club women’s team on October 21st.

During this busy period Privitelli still found the time to continue her studies and complete her 120 hours placement at Ikon Park through La Trobe’s partnership with the Carlton Football club.

Speaking to La Trobe Sport earlier this year, Privitelli said growing up ‘she always had a passion for the sport’.

“My biggest dream was to become one of the first women to play in the AFL,” she said. “My love for the sport developed as I started playing and coaching, however I felt like there was an aspect of the game I was yet to be involved in.”

For Privitelli, this turned out to be working in the code she loved and getting vital exposure to the sport industry through her internship at Carlton.

Privitelli gets active during placement.

“Once I completed high school, I received my first job in football which primarily focused on development of the game at the grassroots level.  It was through this opportunity that I realised that a degree in Sports Management was a way I could transform my passion for AFL into a career in the industry.”

Choosing where to complete that Sports Management degree was not a decision Privitelli took lightly, hoping to balance her busy lifestyle while maximising her opportunities to become career-ready post degree.

“La Trobe stood out to me as the clear choice as they had the most extensive options for Sports Management.  The university also appealed to me as they were able to support my commitments as a footballer through the La Trobe Elite Athlete Program.”

“As I neared the end of my second year at La Trobe, placement options were at the forefront of my mind and when I was given the chance to undertake my placement at the Carlton Football Club I knew it was the moment I had been waiting for.”

“I was lucky to be offered a role at the club as a Community Outreach Officer along with nine other La Trobe students.”

The students’ responsibilities as Community Outreach Officers included being responsible for creating authentic experiences for fans and creating a sense of belonging for the community by delivering the Community and Diversity programs.

Privitelli (front left) with fellow students, Carlton Staff and Sport Management co-ordinator Pam Kappelides at Ikon Park.

“I’ve had the opportunity to assist a range of people both internal and external to the club, building my network of industry professionals in the process.”

This network includes students and teachers within the Northern corridor, people within communities from different cultural backgrounds and people involved in the women’s AFL academy.”

Privitelli feels that the experience gained throughout the internship, along with the knowledge gained from her degree has equipped her to to start a successful career in the sport industry.

“The experience gained throughout my placement has significantly enhanced my communication and leadership skills.”

“Everything I have learnt throughout my placement in conjunction with the knowledge gained from my degree at La Trobe University leaves me feeling like I can enter the workforce with confidence.”

“I can now complete my degree with the belief that I am well positioned to tackle any challenge that comes my way.”

This article was originally published on the La Trobe University internships blog.

Get to know your professor: Professor of Practice Michael Wildenauer


We sat down with the Professor of Practice Michael Wildenauer, and asked him what he enjoys most about teaching, what kind of professional experience he has, and how he likes to relax.

Current Role

My current role in the La Trobe Business School is Professor of Practice in the Management and Marketing Department. I teach into masters level courses (MMgmt and MBA) in corporate entrepreneurship, innovation, professional ethics in ICT, and corporate governance, which is a pretty mixed bag really!

After I finished my MBA, I started doctoral studies in business which is when I started to become interested teaching at tertiary level. I did some sessional teaching online and face to face for a couple of universities in areas where I had many years of professional experience before I started at La Trobe. My MBA studies and doctoral research moved me away from ICT towards the dark side (Management Theory and Behavioural Corporate Governance) somewhat.

What subject matter do you most enjoy teaching?

I really enjoy teaching professional ethics in ICT course, which includes lots of content about the societal and legal, as well as ethical, impact of technology in both professional and everyday life. Teaching innovation by getting the class to design thinking activities is also great fun, and its fulfilling to see students come up with interesting ideas to solve tricky problems.

What do you value most about La Trobe University?

I think that access for underserved communities from a very wide range of backgrounds in Melbourne’s north and especially in regional Victoria is really valuable.

Outside of the University, what is your professional experience?

I have had 30+ years of professional experience before coming to teach at La Trobe. I started out in technology roles (first as a programmer, then as a Unix systems administrator and database admin), then moved to supervisory and then management roles in ICT. I was lucky enough to work for some really interesting organizations, especially during my seven years working in Silicon Valley, but also in Australia, the UK and the Netherlands. During this time I also had some stints consulting and then as a senior executive level manager. Immediately prior to LBS, I was a consultant working for myself, which continues today. I am also a non-executive director of a small rural health service in Central Victoria.

What’s one piece of advice you can share for students to get the most out of their uni experience?

Take advantage of all of everything offered! There is guidance on how to write assignments, how to reference etc. etc. Use it. The Library offers a lot. Get involved with things that interest you – students groups and activities, the Big Idea competition, that sort of thing. If you finish university and have only gone to classes and nothing else, you’ve let some great opportunities go by…

How do you like to relax?

Relax? What’s that? I do like to spend time at a local café where I live in the Macedon Ranges, working or (more often) chatting with the regulars which seem to include quite a few authors among their number, which makes for interesting conversations. OK, actually mostly complaining about the weather and tourists…

 

LBS Professors of Practice Profiles – Mark Cloney: “This is the time to open your mind and prosper”

As an LBS Professor of Practice, Mark Cloney brings a wealth of management and government experience to La Trobe Business School. With over twenty years of experience in the public sector and ten in the private sector, Mark Cloney has insights into economics, business and public policy practice that will undoubtedly be invaluable to students.

“I worked in the Commonwealth government for over twenty years.” Mark comments. “First I was in the department of Transport and Regional Development for thirteen years as a Director of Regional Development Policy, and afterwards I was in Senior Executive Service in the Department Agriculture, as the Assistant Secretary of Business Assurance and Risk.”

When asked about the skillset needed to enter the Public Sector, Mark is clear: “For a career in the public sector, people need common sense, a hands-on attitude, analytical skills, and a strong understanding of how government works and to be flexible and adaptable – because things change!. It is also crucial to understand how policy decisions will affect the broader community, and not just the intended target groups of a particular policy.”

A practical attitude is something that Mark is keen to pass on to his students through his teaching. As an assignment, Mark instructs his students to write a two-page brief to the minister after going through a case study about a specific decision or problem. In the assignment, students are asked to give a minister on overview of the options available in a short brief, to help the minister to make an informed decision. To this end, students must provide a brief history on the problem, the context, explain why it’s a problem, as well as policy options for consideration. Mark says. “Ministers usually don’t have a lot of time on their hands, so they need all the key information required, as quickly and succinctly as possible. They can always follow-up if they want more”.

During this process, policy officers must remain politically neutral, and look into solutions from a range of quite often competing perspectives. “In the position of a policy officer, you will have stakeholders coming at you from all sides,” Mark comments. “Often it is your job to find policy options that works for a variety of stakeholders. It is the Minister’s role to choose the options that best suits the political agenda and priorities of the government.”

When asked how being a policy officers differs from his current position, Mark says he is enjoying the change of environment; “As an academic, you can be a lot more independent in your research and teaching away from the daily cut and thrust of politics that senior bureaucrats have to deal with. When you work in policy in government, you’ll quickly discover that there is no silver bullet, or ‘right’ economic or policy theory for a lot of social, environmental or political problems.  Many of the major of problems of today are ‘wicked’ in nature i.e. climate change, pollution, or indigenous disadvantage etc. and not easily resolvable.  And, as government’s and ministers change so do their priorities and political agendas and consequently their appetite to address some problems and not others.”

So, how do you solve big problems as a policy officer? “You apply as many different lenses (tools, frameworks and approaches) to look at problems and take into account different stakeholder views,” Mark reckons. “When dealing with a problem on a large scale, you will need a range of solutions to address different symptoms caused by the problem and you need to work across jurisdictions and government agencies. No one agency or level of government has the answer or capacity to address the wicked problems. As a Policy Advisor, you will need to be able to think out of the box and apply innovation to your thinking. This is why broad based course such as political economy and economics are very useful for students try to understand global issues and public policy approaches.”

When it comes to forming students who are ready for the work-force, Mark Cloney is positive. He is encouraging when it comes to industry placements. As a Professor of Practice, Mark has been a strong advocate for pushing industry partnerships, collaboration, and blended learning. “A lot of the tools students need today come down to having a broader skillset rather than narrow knowledge gained from a particular discipline or course.  It is about how they use the knowledge obtained through their degree to collaborate, problem solve and innovate more broadly. This is what is demanded in a knowledge based global economy”.

Mark says, “Universities are great places to explore your interests, and try out new things. Students should take advantage of that but always with an eye to future employment.”

Dr Sajad Fayezi receives La Trobe Social Research Assistance Platform Grant

Dr Sajad Fayezi has recently received a La Trobe Social Research Assistance Platform Grant to the value of $9,199.14. This grant is given out by La Trobe University’s Office of Research Infrastructure.

The La Trobe Social Research Assistance Platform provides individual researchers and teams who are engaged in research projects with specific and specialised research support to facilitate effective completion. The Platform’s Grants aim to optimise the use of research infrastructure, accelerate research outcomes and in turn, enhance the University’s capacity to engage with industry and build research collaborations.

Successful grant applicants will have access to:

  • a manager who will identify and arrange appropriate sessional or contract personnel to provide research support in a timely manner,
  • a needs-assessed grant to cover costs relating to the payment and travel expenses of research assistants.

Dr Sajad Fajezi received the grant for his project titled ‘Assessing Agency Theory: After 40 Years, Lost in the Wilderness or Promising Integrated Theory’. This project is an international collaboration with researchers from University of Pittsburgh and University of Minnesota. The La Trobe Social Research Assistance Platform Grants optimise the use of research infrastructure, accelerate research outcomes and enhance the University’s capacity to engage with industry and build research collaborations.

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