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How our expanded City Campus helps you succeed

By Kelly Griffin

Our expanded City Campus offers you greater learning opportunities and access to our premium concierge and Career-Ready Advantage services.

Located in the heart of Melbourne’s Central Business District, our updated state-of-the-art facilities and services are tailored to help you accelerate your career.

Location, location & flexible study options

Our City Campus is conveniently located on Collins Street to meet the needs of busy, working professionals. As many of our City Campus courses offer study options outside regular working hours, you can fit your study around full-time or part-time work without having to leave the CBD.

Flexible study options in the city centre are just one way our City Campus helps you succeed.

New teaching and learning spaces

In addition to occupying level 20 of the prestigious 360 Collins Street building, our City Campus now extends over levels 2 and 3 to offer you a variety of new and innovative teaching and collaborative learning spaces.

Premium Concierge & support services

At our City Campus, our dedicated Concierge team will be your first touchpoint for all postgraduate student enquiries.

Our Ask La Trobe team will now be available at the City Campus to answer questions about study and student life face to face.

These dedicated support services reflect the University’s commitment to ensuring our students receive the assistance they need in a timely manner.

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Greater course options

We’ve increased our City Campus postgraduate program offerings to meet the demands of business professionals. Choose from our comprehensive suite of Master’s programs including the award-winning La Trobe MBA.

Many courses are available for intensive ‘block mode’ study as well as options for study outside normal working hours.

Career Ready Advantage

As part of Career Ready Advantage, there will be support opportunities and workshops at the city campus for all students during the year. Career Ready Advantage is a program that helps you build your skills, manage your career, track and assess your progress, unlock rewards and build your portfolio, so that when you complete your course, you’re ready to hit the ground running.

To find out more about how our City Campus can off you the flexibility you need to accelerate your career, register for a one-on-one consultation and speak with one of our postgraduate course specialists.

This post was orginally published on the La Trobe University Knowledge Blog.

 

Regional brain drain worsens

An Australian-first study has revealed regional students across every state and territory are turning to metropolitan universities at an unprecedented rate.

The new study, funded by the National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education (NCSEHE) at Curtin University, and led by La Trobe University researchers, LBS’s Dr Buly Cardak and Matt Brett and Dr Mark Bowden of Swinburne University, shows the number of regional students across Australia moving to a city location to study increased by more than 76% between 2008 and 2014.

“We found the growth in regional students relocating to metropolitan universities far outstrips growth of regional students taking up higher education places in either their home town or another regional location. However, regional students studying in regional locations are still a majority, and are attracted to a small number of larger regional centres,” La Trobe Business School’s Associate Professor Buly Cardak said.

“This growth was particularly strong with more flexible modes of study. We found mature aged students, students with disabilities, or those wanting to study part-time are increasingly turning to city campuses.”

The researchers used enrollment data drawn from the Department of Education and Training from 2008-2014 which uniquely classifies students as regional based on their residential location when they started university.

“Previous information only accounted for students’ current home addresses. Using this new information we can see that the number of regional students enrolling in university has grown by almost 39% over this period.”

“This is in stark comparison to the conventional wisdom based on existing data, which shows the growth rate in regional student numbers is slightly lower than the rate of growth in metropolitan student numbers”

The report also indicated that regional students likely to face financial constraints are no less likely to attend university, and are instead displaying a greater likelihood of graduation.

“Our findings turn a lot of commonly held perceptions about regional students on their head, and is likely to have significant implications for the sector.”

“For example, how might the Government prioritise funding allocations, now that we know an increasing number of regional students are instead choosing metropolitan campuses? Do they invest more in the city, providing infrastructure and support for migrating students or do they increase incentives for students to stay in or return to regional locations where skilled graduates are in short supply?”

NCSEHE Director Professor Sue Trinidad said the report offers a new perspective on regional participation and paves the way for future discussion and policy advancements.

“The findings of this report are positive. It provides an evidence base for what is really happening with regional students accessing higher education. The issue now is the challenge of attracting graduates back to our regional areas, and the associated policy implications,” Professor Trinidad said.

The report, Regional student Participation and Migration, is available from the NCSEHE website.

Editor’s note:

The NCSEHE aims to inform public policy design and implementation and institutional practice to improve the higher education participation and success for marginalised and disadvantaged people.

La Trobe University is Victoria’s third oldest University. Established in 1971 it is now firmly entrenched in the world’s top 400 universities. It currently has more than 36,000 students and is the largest provider of higher education in regional Victoria.

 

La Trobe Business School Sport Management student Rebecca Privitelli ready to tackle on and off-field career

La Trobe Business School Sport Management student, Rebecca Privitelli, is rising to prominence throughout Melbourne’s Northern suburbs by cashing in on a huge month in women’s sport.

The 21 year old will be competing in the inaugural AFLW competition in 2017, after being selected by Carlton with pick 142 in the national draft on October 12th this year.

She rounded out her exciting month by being named the first ever head coach of the Northern Knights Football Club women’s team on October 21st.

During this busy period Privitelli still found the time to continue her studies and complete her 120 hours placement at Ikon Park through La Trobe’s partnership with the Carlton Football club.

Speaking to La Trobe Sport earlier this year, Privitelli said growing up ‘she always had a passion for the sport’.

“My biggest dream was to become one of the first women to play in the AFL,” she said. “My love for the sport developed as I started playing and coaching, however I felt like there was an aspect of the game I was yet to be involved in.”

For Privitelli, this turned out to be working in the code she loved and getting vital exposure to the sport industry through her internship at Carlton.

Privitelli gets active during placement.

“Once I completed high school, I received my first job in football which primarily focused on development of the game at the grassroots level.  It was through this opportunity that I realised that a degree in Sports Management was a way I could transform my passion for AFL into a career in the industry.”

Choosing where to complete that Sports Management degree was not a decision Privitelli took lightly, hoping to balance her busy lifestyle while maximising her opportunities to become career-ready post degree.

“La Trobe stood out to me as the clear choice as they had the most extensive options for Sports Management.  The university also appealed to me as they were able to support my commitments as a footballer through the La Trobe Elite Athlete Program.”

“As I neared the end of my second year at La Trobe, placement options were at the forefront of my mind and when I was given the chance to undertake my placement at the Carlton Football Club I knew it was the moment I had been waiting for.”

“I was lucky to be offered a role at the club as a Community Outreach Officer along with nine other La Trobe students.”

The students’ responsibilities as Community Outreach Officers included being responsible for creating authentic experiences for fans and creating a sense of belonging for the community by delivering the Community and Diversity programs.

Privitelli (front left) with fellow students, Carlton Staff and Sport Management co-ordinator Pam Kappelides at Ikon Park.

“I’ve had the opportunity to assist a range of people both internal and external to the club, building my network of industry professionals in the process.”

This network includes students and teachers within the Northern corridor, people within communities from different cultural backgrounds and people involved in the women’s AFL academy.”

Privitelli feels that the experience gained throughout the internship, along with the knowledge gained from her degree has equipped her to to start a successful career in the sport industry.

“The experience gained throughout my placement has significantly enhanced my communication and leadership skills.”

“Everything I have learnt throughout my placement in conjunction with the knowledge gained from my degree at La Trobe University leaves me feeling like I can enter the workforce with confidence.”

“I can now complete my degree with the belief that I am well positioned to tackle any challenge that comes my way.”

This article was originally published on the La Trobe University internships blog.

Hanoi: Values, Ethics and Diversity

By Catherine Ordway

I was visiting the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) yesterday for a meeting, and I was struck by the beauty of the sculpture (pictured above). The female paralympic basketballer is reaching for the ball – and the clear blue Canberra sky. I reflected on what “diversity” now means for organisations, and how that might translate into workplace practices for the students I am about to meet in Hanoi, Vietnam later this week.

I am teaching the subject “Values, Ethics and Diversity in Organisations” as part of the Master of Management. This subject is: “designed to develop students’ critical thinking and research skills to contribute to an informed analysis of the role of values, ethics and diversity in contemporary organisations. Through the use of ethical theories, the subject aims to develop students’ abilities to re- frame organisational practices and to include ethical considerations in organisational decision-making. The concept of workplace diversity is introduced and evaluated in Australian and global contexts. Frameworks and tools for managing business ethics and diversity are introduced and critically evaluated. The subject is designed to meet principles 1-4 of the PRME principles.”

The United Nations (UN) Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) initiative of the UN Global Compact seeks to inspire and champion responsible management education, research, and thought leadership globally. As set out in La Trobe’s most recent UNPRME report, I am pleased to be one of the: “11 Professors of Practice with significant and ongoing industry experience to ensure our teaching and curriculum keep step with industry practice.

The Professor of Practice title also seeks to highlight what industry can contribute to academia and while many Australian business schools offer industry experts positions as casual or adjunct staff, La Trobe is the first university in Australia to formally employ them and integrate them into the day-to-day operations of the school. The Professors of Practice contribute practical advice and industry networks and connections to our students, while improving curriculum design by ensuring it is relevant and up-to-date with industry standards and trends. As well as contributing to research and teaching, our Professors of Practice facilitate meaningful engagement with leaders in business, government policy making and the not-for-profit sector”.

The cooperation with Hanoi University is a very exciting initiative, and am very happy to be a part of it.

Dr Jasvir Nachatar Singh receives SOTL grant

Recently, LBS lecturer Dr Jasvir Nachatar Singh was awarded a grant from the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) fund.

La Trobe University is committed to ensuring high quality learning experiences for students and a culture that recognises and rewards great teaching. Pedagogical practices that enhance the student learning experience are strongly valued. La Trobe Learning and Teaching (LTLT) the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) Fund scholarships were created to support these evidence-based practices.

The SOTL Fund consists of a pool of funds supporting:

  • Category A: grants up to $100,000: Projects that will result in significant change across La Trobe and address one of more of the University’s strategic targets in student retention, success, satisfaction and graduate outcomes.
  • Category B: grants of up to $20,000: Proof of concept that could lead to a larger, more significant project; or a small project that will address one or more of the University’s strategic targets in students retention, success, satisfaction and graduate outcomes, within a School or College.
  • Professional development grants: Funding will only be allocated to teaching focussed staff for professional development opportunities. Applicants can apply for up to $3,000.

Dr Jasvir Nachatar Singh’s project is titled ‘Undergraduate International Students Engagement Experiences in a Blended Learning Environment: An Exploratory Study at La Trobe University’. It was selected among large number of applications and is awarded the Category B grant for $20,000.

ASSC Professional Staff Awards-LBS success

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On 12 December 2016, ASSC presented its professional staff awards in a ceremony held at La Trobe University’s Melbourne Campus.

These awards recognise the contributions of individual university professional staff members or teams of co-workers in the College, who have excelled in the performance of their duties, made outstanding contributions and inspired other members of the College community.

Across all categories, the university looks for nominations that demonstrate La Trobe’s cultural qualities of connected, innovative, accountable and care.

This year, several LBS staff members were nominated or awarded:

  • Winner of Collaboration award: Dr Kylie White: Dr Kylie White is part of the Curriculum projects team.
  • Winner of the ‘Innovation’ award: Donna Burnett: Donna Burnett is School Manager for La Trobe Business School. She won the innovation award, awarded to the staff member who develops new ideas or processes, or improves existing processes.
  • Winner of the ‘Unsung Hero’ award: Adam Heron: Adam Heron is a Senior Administration Officer (Accreditation) at La Trobe Business School. This award is presented to the staff member who provides exemplary service from behind the scenes.
  • Winner of the ‘Workplace Culture’ award: Donna Burnett. This award is presented to a staff member who contributes to a positive and healthy work environment.
  • Special Commendation for the ‘Extra Mile’ award: Dr Kylie White. This award is given to the staff member who goes above and beyond to deliver exceptional service.
  • Nominated for Collaboration award: MBA Team: The MBA team, consisting of LBS’s Belinda Westerlo, along with Hayley May and Kristy Lillyst, were nominated in the Collaboration category. This award goes to the staff member(s) who work collegially with and advocates for colleagues in or outside of the College.

2016 ASSC College and School research excellence awards

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The Research Excellence Awards are awarded on a yearly basis, and designed to recognise and celebrate research performance across the College of ASSC and its schools, including LBS.

Each School award is valued at an amount of $5,000 to be spent on individual research activity in 2017.

Each College award is valued at an amount of $10,000 to be spent on School research initiatives, to be negotiated between the recipient and the Head of School.

This year, three La Trobe Business School researchers were presented with awards at a ceremony held in November 2016.

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  • LBS Early Career Researcher Award: Dr Sajad Fayezi

Dr Sajad Fayezi is a Senior Lecturer in Operations and Supply Chain Management at La Trobe Business School.

For more information on Dr Sajad Fajezi’s research, see his staff profile.

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  • LBS Mid-Career Researcher Award: Dr Jing Zhao

Dr Jing Zhao joined La Trobe University in July 2010. She completed her PhD degree at the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2010.

For more information on Dr Jing Zhao’s research, see her staff profile.

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  • LBS Excellence in Higher Degree Research Supervision award: Dr Clare D’Souza

Dr Clare D’Souza is an Associate Professor at La Trobe Business School. She works in the Department of Management and Marketing.

For more information on Dr Clare D’Souza’s research, see her staff profile.

Collaborating across borders – The CR3+ Network

PRME La Trobe Business School

By Giselle Weybrecht

La Trobe Business School in Australia has been a PRME signatory since 2008 and an active PRME Champion. They joined forces with several other PRME Signatories to create CR3+ Network. Together the network provides a supportive platform to build international collaboration and enables the participant business schools to work with the PRME and build international and national capacity in Responsible Management Education. I spoke with Associate Professor Suzanne Young, Head of Department and Dr Swati Nagpal, Department of Management and Marketing, from La Trobe Business School, about their participation in this network.

What is the CR3+ Network and how did it come about?

La Trobe Business School has been working with ISAE (Brazil), Audencia Nantes School of Management (France) and Hanken School of Economics (Finland) since 2008 in an effort to exchange ideas, pedagogy, curriculum and research in the area of corporate responsibility. Head of LBS, Professor Paul Mather wrote: “With the support of the Principles for Responsible Executive Education, the CR3+ network’s objective is to promote a debate, inspire changes and propose solutions for challenges related to sustainability and governance, interacting and reaching what UNESCO calls ‘The 5th Pillar of Education: Learning to change and to change society.’”

What are the key features of the programme?

A key outcome of the partnership has been the hosting of an annual CR3+ conference, which has been held at each of the member institutions. Past themes have included governance and sustainability; CSR: expanding horizons, and the power of responsibility. The aim of the CR3+ conferences is to strengthen the partnership and dialogue around sustainability and responsibility, and provide a forum where ideas, developments and concerns in regards to these issues and the work of the PRME can be brought forward.

How is CR3+ different than other similar networks you are part of? How did you meet these specific schools and decide to create a network? 

It involves four schools that are strongly committed to PRME, and which later became PRME Champions, so PRME is very much at the core of CR3+. The network has been driven by the will to learn from each other, bearing in mind that the four schools are from very different and distant parts of the world (Australia, Brazil, Finland and France). From a very early point the core idea was to create a platform for these learning possibilities by organizing a conference involving all 3 (later 4) schools.

What have been some of the challenges? 

The schools are different and distant, not only in geographical terms but also in cultural and institutional terms. Creating special exchanges for students, for example, has faced a number of practical challenges related to differences in terms of tuition fees, types of study programmes, periods of studies, accreditations, etc. Different expectations about the conference have also caused some challenges but overall the learning opportunities and outcomes have far outweighed the challenges.

Successes? 

We have now done one full round of CR3+ conferences (in all 4 schools) and are about to start a second cycle. The mobilization from the different schools has been on the rise – for example, ISAE/FGV researchers have sent many abstracts to the CR3+ conference to be organized in Helsinki – and there has been growing integration between CR3+ events and PRME chapters – the conference in Helsinki will also be tied to a doctoral course organized by the PRME Chapter Nordic (more specifically Hanken, Stockholm School of Economics, BI Norwegian School of Management and CBS).

The CR3+ network has also enabled joint research projects and resulting publications as well as student and staff exchanges.

In autumn 2011, LBS hosted a masters-level exchange student from Hanken to work on a community development project.  Similar student exchanges are currently being planned for LBS students to have the opportunity to extend PRME –related projects at the other CR3+ partner universities.

In 2015, a collaboration between LBS and ISAE tested a new approach to ‘Promoting internationalisation and cross-cultural competency through online collaboration’, which provided opportunities for LBS MBA students to engage in an academic cross-cultural experience with Masters students from ISAE.  The students replicated real-world global communication, by collaborating virtually with people from a different cultural background in real time and jointly solving a series of management problems using online software.

What advice would you have for other schools thinking of putting something similar into place?

The network’s success is due to the relationships between key academic staff in each of the business schools and is also based in their common belief in and focus on the goals of the PRME mission. Members of the network were all early adopters of the PRME and champions of change in their respective institutions. Each School brings to the network their own expertise and demonstrates the national differences in Responsibility and Sustainability initiatives that are seen in academia, industry and government.

Each of the business schools have supported the CR3+ network as they acknowledge that working collaboratively provides greater opportunities for staff and students than working alone. Benefits in research, teaching, partnerships and dialogue have been demonstrated and the parties remain excited about opportunities that are coming from working with others in the new SDG project

What’s next for the initiative?

A pilot project is currently being led by LBS with support from the CR3+ network focused on facilitating a series of national workshops in each country between PRME higher education business schools and members of the UN Global Compact Network to present and interact on the theme of the SDGs. The outcomes of the workshops will be improved dialogue and networks between universities and other sectors, and the initiating of joint projects on the SDGs.

The 5th CR3+ conference will be held at Hanken School of Economics in Helsinki on 28-29 April 2017. The theme of the conference is ‘Making Corporate Responsibility Useful’, where the dominant logic of the ‘business case’ argument for CSR, and the legitimising effect this has on business engagement in CSR, will be brought into question.

This post was originally published on the UNPRME’s Primitime blog.

LBS’s Liam Lenten featured on ABC’s Radio 666 Canberra discussing the Brownlow Medal

 Liam Lenten Sports La Trobe Business School Federal Election

Recently, Dr Liam Lenten was featured on ABC’s Radio 666 Canberra, talking about his research on the voting process in the AFL’s Brownlow Medal (the ‘Best and Fairest’ award). In his research, Dr Liam Lenten analysed how umpires vote and whether they have any biases.

During the segment, Dr Lenten says he became motivated to test for how Indigenous players draw votes from umpires early on in the project – a time at which there were a number of unsavoury incidents involving adverse fan behaviour (particularly) towards now-retired Sydney star Adam Goodes.

‘As economists, we are interested in voting biases whenever and wherever they occur, as they violate the notion of pure rationality. There are many examples in the literature involving data from various competitive environments, including many from sports, but also political elections, and even song contests such as Eurovision or Idol’, Dr Lenten says.

In this case, he employs econometric modelling and regression techniques, as well as a comprehensive database of over 100,000 player-within-match observations, in all of the 2,288 home-and-away AFL matches from 1998-2010.

Lenten says ‘…when I compared the number of votes between groups, Indigenous players quantitatively poll 6.6% more average votes per match than non-Indigenous players – this difference was statistically significant, but only weakly so’.

He qualifies this by saying that this alone does not imply a voting bias: “The comparison does not account for various factors, which could be driving the result. One possible explanation is that the pool of Indigenous players in the AFL is simply drawn from a higher-distribution of talent than non-Indigenous players. Aspiring Indigenous footballers are more likely to be from regional and remote areas, consistent with being at an elite-level recruitment disadvantage.”

According to Lenten, if this explanation is true, then such differences in talent levels should be picked up by using player performance measures. Specifically, he uses a range of 13 well-known player-level match statistics; such as kicks, handballs, goals scored, and tackles.

The model results show that controlling for player performance explains most (but not quite all) of the difference in average votes awarded. Indigenous players still poll approximately 1.2% more votes than non-indigenous players.

Is this remaining difference evidence that umpires unfairly give more votes to Indigenous players? As a former 200-game umpire himself (at suburban level), Dr Lenten is open to this possibility, but not committal.

‘There could be other productive actions off the ball for which Indigenous players outperform their contemporaries that are not captured within the statistics I use, yet are nonetheless noticed by umpires’. Also, he says: ‘…with respect to goals, it may be that Indigenous players often kick goals with higher degrees of difficulty, which would imply that not all goals have the same vote impact’.

Listen to the full fragment on the ABC website, here (Dr Liam Lenten speaks around the 3:26:00 mark).

Health and Aged Care Industries in China: Change and Opportunities

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The China Studies Research Centre, the Building Healthy Communities RFA’s Healthy Ageing Research Group (HARG) and La Trobe Business School jointly invite you to attend this seminar.

Dr Chuyang Liu will share her reflections and provide insights into the changing landscape of the Chinese health and aged care industry which has created significant opportunities for Australian companies.

China’s demand for health and aged care services is expected to grow significantly over the next decade, driven by the needs of a rapidly growing population, an ageing demographic, new health challenges and government policy reforms.

In 2020, China’s population is expected to reach 1.4 billion, of which 248 million will be aged 60 years and above. These elderly citizens will require accommodation in facilities that support their medical needs and lifestyle, and a qualified workforce to care for them – both of which are in short supply.

The Chinese Government has embarked on an ambitious program to transform the country’s health and aged care industry. It is accelerating reform across the industry, including integrating healthcare and aged care services; introducing policies to attract private capital from domestic and overseas investors; and encouraging the adoption of smart healthcare. The changing landscape of the Chinese health and aged care industry has created significant opportunities for Australian companies.

About the Speaker

Dr Chuyang LIU, China Adviser, International Operations, Austrade. Dr Chuyang Liu has recently returned to Australia from her previous role as Trade Commissioner/Counsellor Commercial in the Australian Embassy in Beijing, China. Chuyang is now China Adviser based in Austrade’s Melbourne office. Prior to joining Austrade in July 2012, Chuyang worked at the Department of Business and Innovation in the Victorian State Government of Australia.

Chuyang is a specialist in international law and WTO law, with extensive experiences in Australia, Europe (mainly Switzerland and the UK), and Asian countries (China, Malaysia, Japan and Korea) during her 24 years’ career.

Chuyang has a PhD of International Economic Law from University of Bern (Switzerland), Master of Business Administration (MBA) from Victoria University (Australia), Master of Maritime Law from Dalian Maritime University, Bachelor of British & American Literature from Dalian Foreign Language University, China.

Event Details

Date:    Monday 21 November 2016

Time:   2:00-3:30pm

Venue: Room 203, Health Sciences 1, La Trobe University

Register: To register, please visit the corresponding La Trobe University event page.

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