Business Newsroom

La Trobe Business School

Tag: La Trobe Business School (page 1 of 18)

LBS Three Minute Thesis Competition

Piyumini (Piu) Wijenayake won this year´s LBS Three Minute Thesis Competition and Madhura Jayaratne was runner up. Congratulations to both! They will be representing the La Trobe Business School during the 3MT ASSC College finals on the 20th of August. If they make it through, they will represent the ASSC College during the university final on the 30th of August. Ultimately, the winner of the university’s final will be representing the La Trobe University during the Asia-Pacific final at the University of Queensland on the 27th of September.

What is 3MT?

The Three Minute Thesis competition (or 3MT), is an annual international competition where PhD candidates explain their research topic to a non-specialist audience in just three minutes.

There are strict rules:

  • A single static PowerPoint slide is permitted. No slide transitions, animations or ‘movement’ of any description are allowed. The slide is to be presented from the beginning of the oration.
  • No additional electronic media (e.g. sound and video files) are permitted.
  • No additional props (e.g. costumes, musical instruments, laboratory equipment) are permitted.
  • Presentations are limited to 3 minutes maximum and competitors exceeding 3 minutes are disqualified.
  • Presentations are to be spoken word (e.g. no poems, raps or songs).
  • Presentations are to commence from the stage.
  • Presentations are considered to have commenced when a presenter starts their presentation through either movement or speech.
  • The decision of the adjudicating panel is final.

Why do it?

Besides the ability to win prize money (EVERY round), graduate researchers develop presentation, research and academic communication skills. Participating in the 3MT also helps the development of candidates’ capacity to explain their work effectively.

The LBS 3MT presentations

This year, three LBS graduate researchers entered the LBS Three Minute Thesis Competition. Chi Kwan Ng presented on, “The influence of others on personal adoption of carbon reduction behaviours” and Madhura Jayaratne´s presentation was titled, “Big data fusion. Artificial Intelligence to improve our future”. Piu Wijenayake won this year’s LBS 3MT with her presentation, “How about an Artificial Hug?”. Her thesis is about how artificial intelligence & social media can help create more caring organisations. Once again congratulations!

Piu Wijenayake
Madhura Jayaratne
Chi Kwan Ng

Where and when to support our LBS graduate researchers?

  • ASSC College finals: 20 August, 10.15am, JSMH Chamber: RSVP here
  • University 3MT final: 30 August 2018, 2:15 pm, JSMH Chamber: RSVP here

 

The “Aldi way”

LBS researcher Dr Angela McCabe and Dr Tom Osegowitsch (University of Melbourne), wrote an article for The Conversation on the secret to Aldi’s success.

Aldi’s strategy

An important element of Aldi’s strategy is a severely limited range of “preselected” products, overwhelmingly private brands. The company’s smaller range (some 1,500 store-keeping units as opposed to 20,000 to 30,000 in a large Coles or Woolworths outlet) has several advantages – in terms of store footprints, warehousing infrastructure and supplier discounts, to name a few.

Strategy has limits

In embracing the “Aldi way”, the company has made hard strategic choices. But it’s turning away shoppers who value things other than what’s on offer at Aldi – larger choice, established brands, more service, plusher stores, in-store bakeries and delis or expanded fresh food sections. As a result, Aldi’s growth in Australia is going to reach its limits.

Read the full article here:

The secret to Aldi’s success is choosing what not to do

 

Angela McCabe is a Lecturer in the Department of Management, Sport and Tourism at La Trobe University. Angela McCabe’s research focuses on the mechanism of knowledge transfer and knowledge co-production in cross-sector collaboration. Her work has contributed to understanding the way in which behavioural and institutional dynamics affect teamwork and the production and dissemination of knowledge within university-industry-government networks.

LBS Innovation Series: The critical factors that determine why start-ups succeed (and fail)

Why do 9 out of 10 start-ups fail? A question of interest to Christine Christian; Chairman of Kirwood Capital, Director of FlexiGroup Limited, Victorian Managed Insurance Authority, ME Bank and Lonsec Fiscal Group, Deputy President and Board Member at State Library of Victoria and Co-Founder of New-York based Powerlinx Inc.

What drives success in start-ups?

In her presentation, Christine draws on her vast corporate and philanthropic background to explore what have been the success factors for new start-ups from her experience. Christine discusses key elements such as the skills you must develop to succeed, the importance of timing, the strength of an idea, funding for success and the execution for start-ups. Christine presents from her perspective as a co-investor in start-ups over the last 5 years where she has made 11 start-up investments.

Why do so many start-ups fail?

Together with some co-investors, Christine commissioned research using Dunn and Bradstreet data to conduct regression analysis of what drives success in start-ups. What is the biggest predictor of likely success among the common elements? E.g. strength of idea, timing, leadership, strength of the team, amount of working capital, execution, marketing etc.

Timing, timing, timing

Her answer may surprise you. Christine presents statistical evidence that timing is the biggest predictor of start-up success, although all the elements remain important. That is, to attract investors, start-ups need to bring something different to a market at a moment in time that is attractive and accessible to consumers and can be enabled by smart technology.

 

Watch Christine’s presentation below:

 

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics in the La Trobe Business School. The series was developed after the successful National Innovation Forum organised by La Trobe Business School, NORTH Link and Deloitte Consulting P/L.

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:

Jamila Gordon – How LTU can make dreams come true

LBS alumna, Jamila Gordon, was interviewed by the Australian Institute of Company Directors (AICD). The interview shows the amazing story of a Somali refugee who is now a high profile Non-Executive Director at Jayride & Advisory Board Member at Venture Crowd. Jamila sat on the university’s Board for five years and sits now on the Board of CareerSeekers, a not-for-profit that helps refugees and asylum seekers find roles within corporate Australia.

From Somalia to La Trobe

Jamila’s family had to flee her home country because of the Somali Civil War. She stayed in Kenya with distant relatives before she met an Australia backpacker who would help her emigrate to Australia. Her dream of going to university almost fell apart when every university in Sydney rejected her. La Trobe University, known for providing educational opportunities for students from disadvantaged backgrounds, accepted Jamila. She became part of the LBS community studying a bachelor of Business (Information Technology).

In the interview Jamila talks about her journey and her career but also about how LTU taught her big-picture thinking, and mentions the great support she received from La Trobe University.

“Not only did they help me, they provided amazing support.”

Read the full article: What I’ve Learned: Jamila Gordon

International Conference of Organizational Innovation (2018 ICOI)

The 12th International Conference of Organizational Innovation (2018 ICOI), Asia’s prominent Management and Innovation Conference, was recently held in Fukuoka, Japan. The conference is co-sponsored by La Trobe Business School. Conference host, Fukuoka University, delivered an outstanding event with spectacular views from the top floor of the Business School Building. A highlight was the student drum session. The 2018 ICOI was the most successful conference to date, and LBS is proud to be the only Australian University associated with the conference.

International scholars from over two-dozen countries presented 239 papers associated to organizational innovation. Included were two papers from LBS’ graduate researchers Ana Amirsardari and Roula Tabbah, presented by their Research Supervisor, Professor Alex Maritz.  Seen below is the organising committee of the conference, (L-R) Dr Charles Shieh (Conference Chair), Professor Alex Maritz (VP, International Association of Organizational Innovation), Dr Frederick Dembowski (President, International Association of Organizational Innovation and Mr Aria Aulandri (Indonesian Chair).

Keynotes included dynamic presentations on Renewable Energy, Resource Constrained Innovation and Innovating Organizational Innovation, together with VIP speeches from prominent international scholars, including Professors Niklov, Hristova, Dass, Gunawa, Huang, Jen-der Day, Antanov, de Waal and Engelbert.

Our special appreciation to Professor Yamazaki Yoshhiro, Faculty of Economics, Fukuoka University, for hosting a successful 2018 ICOI. LBS and Fukuoka University have agreed to future research collaboration and student/staff engagement.

 

2018 ICOI

LBS’ involvement with UN’s PRME

CR3+ is a partnership between LBS, Audencia Business School (France), Hanken School of Economics (Finland) and ISAE Brazilian Business School (Brazil). The partnership builds on the schools’ involvement with the UN Principles for Responsible Management Education, also known as PRME.

 

2018 CR3+ conference

From the 12th until the 14th of June the 6th CR3+ conference was held at Audencia Business School. The theme of the conference was “Navigating the Plural Voices of Corporate Responsibility (CR)”, which recognises that CR is situated at the interface of business and society, and as such requires business to draw on a multitude of voices (and in some cases, the voiceless) to reduce their negative impact and/or contribute to society’s wellbeing. The conference had four key areas:

  • Education for sustainably
  • Theoretical voices in Corporate Responsibility research
  • Stakeholder engagement
  • Giving voice to the unheard actors in Corporate Responsibility

 

LBS was well represented with 7 delegates attending the conference; Professor Suzanne Young, Dr Leila Afshari, Dr Nicole El-Haber, Dr Jillian Cavanagh, Dr Swati Nagpal, Dr William Keeton and Ms Patricia Pariona Cabrera. The papers presented by our LBS academics covered wide-ranging topics including community engagement, employee volunteering, corruption, graduate skills for sustainability and workers with intellectual disabilities:

  • Graduate Business Skills for Sustainability: The Nexus of Curriculum and Pedagogy.
  • Beyond CSR: Workers with intellectual disability and their ‘calling’ to further their careers.
  • Corporate responsibility and community engagement: complex decision-making in water organisations in Victoria, Australia.
  • Employee Volunteering: Individual and Organizational Levels of Action.
  • Authentic leaders and corrupt practices: Overshadowing effect of corruption normalization and highly regulated localization.

Why not bulldoze business schools?

There were also expert panel discussions, including one that Professor Suzanne Young was part of entitled “Why not bulldoze business schools”, in response to Martin Parker’s article in The Guardian.

The panel members took opposing points of view with some speaking of the importance of business schools in challenging the status quo and embedding issues of responsibility and sustainability into their ways of working; whereas others spoke of business education cementing the norms of business practices and the focus on profit and self-interest. Professor Young took the former viewpoint and gave examples of La Trobe University and La Trobe Business School’s values and practices. Examples included the university’s gender equality practices, sustainability and responsibility courses and curriculum, hosting of governance and sustainability conferences, as well as Sustainable Development Goals workshops.

10 years a UN PRME signatory

2018 marks LBS’ 10th year as a UN PRME signatory and the CR3+ conference is just one example of our global partnerships in corporate responsibility and sustainability. You can read more about LBS’ involvement with UN PRME and the progress LBS is making in research, curriculum and partnerships in our Sharing of Information on Progress (SIP) report later this year. Watch this space for more information.

2019 CR3+ conference

It’s also exciting to announce that LBS will be hosting the 7th CR3+ conference in late 2019 at our city campus. If you would like to be involved in the conference organising committee or the UN PRME community of practice at LBS, please contact Dr Swati Nagpal.

LBS Innovation Series: How can universities strengthen firms’ innovative ability?

The next presentation in the LBS Innovation Series is by Dr Stephan Buse, Deputy Director of the Institute for Technology and Innovation Management (TIM) at Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH). Stephan talks about academia-industry collaboration and engagement, and how universities can strengthen firms’ innovative ability.

Frugal innovation

Stephan argues that to succeed in emerging markets, especially in powerhouses like China and India, many companies from industrialised nations have had to change their established business models. In this environment, to remain competitive, a new way of thinking and acting is required.  Frugal innovation is a strategic approach to deal with these new challenges.

According to Stephan, frugal innovation refers to products and services that seek to minimise the use of material and financial resources across the complete value chain. The objective is to substantially reduce not just price but the complete cost of ownership/usage of a product. By adopting this approach firms can develop products that bring better priced quality goods to the customer both in the Business-to-Consumer and Business-to-Business sectors. He also gives examples of strong university-industry collaboration through the use of ethnography an emerging tool used to better identify habits of consumers.

 

Watch his presentation below:

 

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics in the La Trobe Business School. The series was developed after the successful National Innovation Forum organised by La Trobe Business School, NORTH Link and Deloitte Consulting P/L.

Other blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:

Does Data Eat Strategy for Breakfast?

Businesses are operating in environments with increasingly large and complex sets of data.  This revolution of data is hitting every industry. Every organisation now has the power to harness large amounts of information that can help inform strategic decisions.

La Trobe University organised a panel discussion among leading industry experts to discuss and explore the synergy between data and strategy, whilst highlighting the importance of developing strategies to become a data-driven organisation.

The panel

  • Phil Bolton: Director at PwC Australia, who also leads the Safety Analytics practice. He has been delivering data analytics projects to businesses across a broad range of industries and countries for over 15 years.
  • Edith Cheng: Head of Digital Marketing & Analytics at Lens10, a digital analytics agency. Starting out in digital marketing, she developed an interest in analytics and specifically custom analytics integrations, which enable organisations to unlock the value of their data in innovative ways.
  • David de Garis: Director in Economics, Markets, Corporate & Institutional Banking at NAB. He is a business and financial markets economist and consults with clients ranging from the Bank’s agribusiness and corporate clients, to institutional clients at home and abroad.
  • James Fazzino: Vice Chancellor’s Fellow at La Trobe University. James is an LBS alumnus and recently concluded a highly successful eight-year term as Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director of Incitec Pivot Limited.

 

Many LBS staff and students as well as people from outside the university attended the insightful event. The evening was opened by Professor Jane Hamilton, Dean and Head of the La Trobe Business School who mentioned that the university is excited to be at the forefront of this data revolution.

Watch the video to see how the panellists discuss questions such as: How do you see data influencing strategic decision making? Which business sectors are ‘doing data’ well? And do you have data influence your strategy, or do you use data for hypothesis testing?

 

Great PhD success in the La Trobe Business School

Congratulations to Shalinka Jayatilleke, Nick Dejkovski, Tariq Halimi, Teddy Kwakye, Stephen Sim, Joni Vendi, Minh Phong Nguyen and Thi Hoa Nhai Pham on passing their PhD thesis examination and being awarded their PhD’s. Read about their PhD topics below, and check out some of the great graduation pictures.

Dr Shalinka Jayatilleke

Dr Jayatilleke investigated the issue of managing software requirements changes in the Information Technology industry which often result in problems like cost overruns and project delays.  She has developed a method each for; (i) change specification and classification; (ii) change analysis; and (iii) rework assessment, in order to help alleviate the problems.

 

Dr Teddy Ossei Kwakye

Dr Kwakye examined the effect of business strategy on the cost of external financing. The findings show that innovative-oriented firms have higher cost of equity than their efficiency-oriented counterparts due to their greater non-diversifiable business risk and lower quality of financial reports. The research advances business strategy as a direct antecedent of firms cost of equity capital.

 

Dr Tariq Halimi

Dr Halimi examined the influence of political relations between countries on the consumer purchase decision. It was found that positive relations between countries can provide a competitive advantage for their international companies when marketing their products. This thesis contributes to theory development in consumer purchase decision-making and develops a conceptual model that has implications for marketers.

 

Dr Stephen Sim

Dr Sim explored the ethical HRM of workers with a range of mental and intellectual disabilities at two Australian social enterprises. To better support workers with disabilities with inclusive practises, organisational management should not only focus on policies and practises, but also provide innovative and positive workplace experiences.

 

LBS Innovation Series: Welcome to the 4th industrial revolution

The next presentation in the LBS Innovation Series is from Craig Scroggie, the CEO of NEXTDC, Australia’s leading Data-Centre-as-a-Service provider. Craig challenges us to think about and imagine the future through the lens of ever expanding data analytic possibilities.

Theoretical influences

Craig’s presentation is grounded in four major theoretical influences: Moore’s Law (the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits will double every year); Schumpeter Economics (i.e. the notion of creative destruction) and the books, The Lean Start-up by Eric Ries; and, The Fourth Industrial Revolution by Klaus Schwab.

Internet of Things

As Craig explains, data is the electricity of our age and the amount is doubling every two years, yet we analyse less than 1% of current global data. He tells us global internet traffic will nearly triple over the next five years, driving billions of dollars of investment in the construction of new data centres and communications networks to enable our digital lives. With the Internet of Things we’re entering a whole new era of technology with – machine learning, self-driving cars, drones, 3D printed body parts, robotics, and artificial intelligence etc. We will have new opportunities for solutions to challenges such as digital disruption, which affects areas such as medical research, sustainability, energy, education and transport. Craig suggests that more opportunities will also emerge from the convergence of technologies over time. His advice for start-ups and entrepreneurs is to develop products and services using lean methods and platforms aimed at the mobile market (not desktop computers).

 

Watch his presentation:

 

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics in the La Trobe Business School. The series was developed after the successful National Innovation Forum organised by La Trobe Business School, NORTH Link and Deloitte Consulting P/L.

Other blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:

Older posts

© 2018 Business Newsroom

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑