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Tag: AI

Centre for Data Analytics and Cognition – A new paradigm in AI

Data is everywhere and being created almost constantly. This calls for a new way of handling data.

With traditional data, the person who wants to use the data has to create that data. Although called Artificial Intelligence (AI), traditionally AI needs to be trained with data and outcomes that are known. So researchers have to build the Artificial Intelligence and algorithms to suit the problem and to suit the data. Now, data is generated by machines, leading to great amounts of data yet to be interpreted. Machines generate data at a rate that could go up to hundred thousands of data points a second. This data is being created through media, the cloud, the web, the Internet of Things, sensors, etc. It is no longer possible to connect each of these individual data point to objects in the real world. It is not possible anymore to build the AI, because the data is unknown, and so is the problem or outcome.

This new type of data is in real-time, online, machine generated, in high volumes and granular, and means we need a new paradigm. A paradigm that allows AI to make sense of data collected through for example text, images and videos, especially in social media, and capture feelings, emotions and someone’s personality.

CDAC AI

Centre for Data Analytics and Cognition Lab

LBS’ Centre for Data Analytics and Cognition Lab (CDAC) specialises in research and development of cutting-edge artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning algorithms and the transformation of these into practical tools and technology for business and other practical applications in advanced analytics. The team consist of a group of big data experts with outstanding research and academic achievements on top of many years of industry experience in the areas of finance, telecommunications, IT and business.

CDAC and the new paradigm

One of the key areas CDAC is involved with, building AI that builds itself, called self-structuring AI. The other aspect is that it allows for unsupervised learning. This means that the AI not only builds itself, it also learns by itself. It does not need to be trained. It can still be trained, but it has the capability to learn by itself. The CDAC team then transforms this technology into practical technology, called technological AI building blocks so it can be used to serve the community.

The great news is that collaboration is already taking place with industry, governments and academia.

Contact or visit

For more information visit the Centre for Data Analytics and Cognition.

Donald Whitehead Building, Room 301, Level 3
La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC 3086

Or visit the website https://www.latrobe.edu.au/cdac

LBS Innovation Series: Robotics and AI are coming your way

Watch Professor Peter Corke give a presentation about robotics, AI and computer vision technologies with examples of what they mean for food production, and how they are changing the business environment.

About Peter

Peter Corke is Professor of Robotic Vision at Queensland University of Technology (QUT), and director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Robotic Vision. His research is concerned with enabling robots to see, and the application of robots to mining, agriculture and environmental monitoring. He is well known for his robotics toolbox software for MATLAB, the best-selling textbook “Robotics, Vision, and Control”, massive open online courses (MOOC) and the online Robot Academy. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering. Peter also has held several editorial board positions and held various visiting positions.

Agbots

Robotics technology is almost 60 years old. Artificial intelligence, particularly computer vision, has dramatically increased the fields into which robots can be employed. Peter’s talk covers examples of recent work, at QUT and elsewhere, will be used to illustrate what the near future entails. For example, pointing out that farm machinery control is largely a visual task, Peter suggests that with vison assisted robotics there can be an alternative future where multiple small (low land pressure) unmanned ground ‘agbots’ take the place of very large manned farm machinery (high land pressure).

Please enjoy Peter’s presentation.

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School.

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:
- LBS Innovation Series: Gaps to perfection
- LBS Innovation Series: Building a global business in a period of disruption
- LBS Innovation Series: Is the Australian agriculture sector ready to grow?
- LBS Innovation Series: Agtech – Agriculture’s Disrupter or Saviour?
- LBS Innovation Series: Crossing the Chasm – Agtech & innovation ecosystems
- Innovation Series: Innovation and the Victorian Chamber’s Agribusiness Taskforce
- LBS Innovation Series: Supply challenges and consumer expectations

LBS Innovation Series: Welcome to the 4th industrial revolution

The next presentation in the LBS Innovation Series is from Craig Scroggie, the CEO of NEXTDC, Australia’s leading Data-Centre-as-a-Service provider. Craig challenges us to think about and imagine the future through the lens of ever expanding data analytic possibilities.

Theoretical influences

Craig’s presentation is grounded in four major theoretical influences: Moore’s Law (the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits will double every year); Schumpeter Economics (i.e. the notion of creative destruction) and the books, The Lean Start-up by Eric Ries; and, The Fourth Industrial Revolution by Klaus Schwab.

Internet of Things

As Craig explains, data is the electricity of our age and the amount is doubling every two years, yet we analyse less than 1% of current global data. He tells us global internet traffic will nearly triple over the next five years, driving billions of dollars of investment in the construction of new data centres and communications networks to enable our digital lives. With the Internet of Things we’re entering a whole new era of technology with – machine learning, self-driving cars, drones, 3D printed body parts, robotics, and artificial intelligence etc. We will have new opportunities for solutions to challenges such as digital disruption, which affects areas such as medical research, sustainability, energy, education and transport. Craig suggests that more opportunities will also emerge from the convergence of technologies over time. His advice for start-ups and entrepreneurs is to develop products and services using lean methods and platforms aimed at the mobile market (not desktop computers).

 

Watch his presentation:

 

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics in the La Trobe Business School. The series was developed after the successful National Innovation Forum organised by La Trobe Business School, NORTH Link and Deloitte Consulting P/L.

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:

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