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The Donald Whitehead Building has officially been opened!

Donald Whitehead building

Donald Whitehead building

On 30 August 2017, The Donald Whitehead Building was officially opened. As a part of the Melbourne Campus masterplan, the building has undergone a full refurbishment and now features brand-new cutting edge teaching and learning facilities.

The refurbishment aimed to create a lively connected space with upgraded staff accommodation, teaching, research and specialist lab spaces, including the Finance Trading Room, the LBS Data Analytics and Cognition Lab, the lab for the Research Centre for Computers, Communication and Social Innovation (RECCSI) and the LBS Judgement and Decision Making (JDM) Lab.

The refurbishments support the University’s Future Ready objectives to instil future-ready graduates with a responsible sense of leadership.

After a Welcome to Country by Dr Julie Andrews, the building was opened by the Head of La Trobe Business School, Professor Paul Mather, as well as La Trobe University’s Acting Vice-Chancellor Kerri-Lee Krause and the University’s Pro Vice-Chancellor Antony McGrew. Both stakeholders and staff members were able to tour the building and see the new facilities on the day.

Our industry connections make you career ready

What you do at university is important to us.

However, it’s what you do after university that interests us the most. We know that studying is a significant investment, so we’re committed to making sure you graduate ready for work.

With the employment landscape evolving constantly, the best way to make sure we’re teaching the right skills is to go straight to the source. That’s why we work closely with industry to find out what they want in graduates – both right now and in the future.

Developing the degrees industry needs

We’re constantly reinvigorating our courses to prepare you for roles in emerging fields of employment. We work directly with industry to identify skill gaps and develop degrees to address them.

For example, our industry partner Cisco has identified that there are currently a million cybersecurity jobs opening globally, with demand projected to rise in the coming years.

In response to this demand, we’ve developed our new suite of cybersecurity degrees with input from Cisco, Optus, Australia Post, Australian Signals Directorate (ASD), Cisco, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Symantec, Atlassian and Cloudera.

Simone Bachmann, Head of Information, Security, Innovation and Culture and Australia Post, says, ‘we need people with problem solving skills, we need innovators, we need people with legal and regulatory skills, we need communicators and educators to help people understand the problem.’ These degrees address the growing need for cybersecurity professionals with interdisciplinary skills.

Our Master of Sport Analytics (developed with leading sports clubs and technology companies), Master of Business Analytics (with 20 per cent of the curriculum taught by industry experts) and Master of Data Science (addressing a data analytics skills shortage) are other examples of our industry relationships preparing students for the future of work.

Future-facing industry partnerships

We’ve established relationships with major organisations to make sure we stay at the forefront of industry developments.

Our partnership with Optus, which focuses on cybersecurity, will result in scholarships and Work Integrated Learning (WIL) opportunities for our students, as well as employment pathways for graduates.

We work closely with a number of sporting clubs, including Melbourne City Football Club, Carlton Football Club, AFL Player’s Association, Bendigo Spirit and IPL Kings XI Punjab to give our students access to work placements as well as research and internship opportunities.

We’re also the only university to offer an accredited art subject at the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV). As learning partner for the NGV’s summer exhibition, we’ve offered the subject Summer at the NGV for the past four years – in 2017, students were able to study the work of British icon David Hockney.

Preparing you for success with industry insights

Technology is advancing at an incredible rate, which means that many of today’s roles won’t even exist in the future.

It’s our job to prepare you for the roles of the future. We do this by helping you develop the flexibility and transferable skills you need to adapt to the changing market.

We’ve spoken to a number of employers, including PwC, Commonwealth Bank, Alfred Health, Thoughtworks, Pfizer, CSIRO, Melbourne Football Club, Telstra, Bureau of Meteorology, Deloitte, Certified Practicing Accountants and more to identify the core skills and attributes that employers value most highly.

We’ve used these insights to develop Career Ready, a program that supports you to build the attributes employers want. The program includes an app, a dedicated support team, an on-campus recruitment agency, and a range of activities you can participate in to build your skills.

First-hand industry experience

We’re also making sure our students come into contact with industry while they’re still studying.

With our Professors of Practice program, we’re championing a shift in how industry can contribute to education. Our Professors of Practice are industry professionals employed by the university to advise on curriculum, and, in some cases, teach.

Mark Morris, a Professor of Practice in the Department of Accounting, says, ‘I try to provide insights as to what they will find in the workplace wherever I can, because this is exactly the kind of knowledge that can give them an edge to stand out from the crowd.’

Work Integrated Learning (WIL) opportunities place students in organisations, giving them the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge in a real industry environment. After graduation, many of our students are employed by their WIL employer.

This post was originally published on the NEST blog.

LBS 2017 Open Day a great success!

Open Day was one of the busiest to date for La Trobe Business School

Earlier this month, La Trobe Business School opened its doors for the most successful open day to date. Through presentations and several activities, La Trobe Business School staff encouraged young and interested people to learn more about the perks of studying business, commerce, or management. Here’s three great things we took away from our Open Day presentations:

  1. We prepare you for the jobs of tomorrow, even the ones that don’t exist yet.

    Emma Sherry speaking about the LBS Business degrees

    Thanks to digital disruption, the future of work is changing. At Open Day, our Associate Professor Emma Sherry spoke to a full house about how our degrees will equip you with the skills and tools you need to adapt to new professional settings in a changing world. Through our placements and internships, we aim to put students in real organisations, meeting real people and gaining real experience. This gives students a practical and honest look into what it would be like working in their preferred field, and gives them the opportunity to build their own professional networks. For them, this often results in a job once they graduate.

  2. Prepare for working in a globalised business landscape

    Greg Jamieson speaking to students at Open Day

    Greg Jamieson, the Associate Head of La Trobe Business School, spoke about how graduates of tomorrow need to know how to navigate a more globalised landscape. We aim for our students to graduate with practical business skills, a global perspective and a detailed understanding of complex business environments and how they affect each other. Thanks to La Trobe Business School’s partnerships with prestigious universities in France, Vietnam or China, we can provide you with a learning experience that puts you right in the middle of the action, allowing you to hone your management and business skills. Our students complete an internship, practicum or travel tour, and learn through company visits and industry-led seminars. See how businesses operate all over the world, and learn from industry experts with years of experience.

  3. Be ready to work environments varying from multinational organisations to your local community


    Our Design Thinking Challenge Board was covered in ideas by the end of the day!

    Through our design thinking challenge on Open Day, we were able to show young people how a concept like innovation is multilayered and affects our lives in a range of different ways. Through a transdisciplinary degree like our Bachelor of Commerce, we teach you how to tackle multilayered problems in an appropriate way. Our degree brings together accounting, economics, finance, management and marketing students with students from arts, law, and a range of sciences, so you learn how to communicate and work effectively in multidisciplinary, multicultural teams and solve the type of complex social and commercial challenges faced by corporations and diverse communities.Our commerce students are encouraged to develop multidisciplinary skills through taking a double major or double degree. Throughout this degree, you learn how to create sustainable value in corporations and diverse communities. Through this, you also learn how to communicate your own value to future employers.

Keen to know more about our business degrees? Check out our courses.

A low ATAR doesn’t mean missing out on your dream course

If you’re reaching for the stars when it comes to finding your dream course, don’t let anything get in the way – not even an ATAR that’s lower than you’d hoped for. There are lots of options available to help get you into the course you want – you might just have to take a different road.

Each December, VCE students across the state wait anxiously to find out if all their hard work throughout high school has paid off. It doesn’t matter whether you log in online, get a text message or wait for snail mail, waiting for your ATAR results must rank as one of the most nerve-wracking experiences in a teen’s life.

And no wonder. Your ATAR is a culmination of incredibly hard work, determination and persistence. Some people are rewarded with a great result that propels them directly into their dream course at university. But for every person that gets into their desired course, there is another that has to step back, and reassess their planned career path.

Luke Scicluna works in the student recruitment team at La Trobe University, and while he recognises the benefits of getting a great ATAR score, he doesn’t see it as the be-all and end-all.

‘There’s a lot of pressure and expectation around the ATAR. I think there is merit to it when you’ve been at school for 13 years of your life, and you want to have a good send-off, but there are so many variables around ATAR. It’s totally understandable to not achieve the number you were expecting.’

While it can be incredibly deflating to miss out on the course you had set your hopes on, it’s important to have a plan B in place, well before you get your results.

What’s your plan B?

‘If you can’t get in the first instance there are other courses you can enrol in or subjects you can take which may lead you down the road toward your dream course,’ says Luke.

‘There are plenty of examples of students who might not have been able to enrol directly in the degree they were gunning for originally, but eventually find their way in.’

Changing preferences

After the VCE results and ATARs are released, you’ll have the opportunity to review your course preferences. Be sure to consider your folio presentations, feedback from interviews and any auditions, as well as your ATAR results when making changes.

You can change your preferences as many times as you like, up until the closing date. Find out all the important dates for 2017 and 2018 from the VTAC website.

What should you do if your ATAR is just a few points off your dream course? Luke suggests keeping the course as your number one preference. But if your ATAR is way off the mark, it’s time to shuffle those preferences and choose a different pathway course on your VTAC preference form instead.

It’s critical to do your research well before you submit your preferences. First of all, you need to make sure you meet all the prerequisites. Secondly, you need to check which course pathways offer the best chance to get you into the course you ultimately want.

If you need advice, talk to the experts. Luke refers to VTAC as the ‘source of truth’, and says it’s the place to get the most up-to-date information about all courses and requirements. If you need more, go to the university directly – La Trobe offers a range of different ways to connect and ask questions.

So don’t be shy. Make sure the next step is the right one for you and get an expert second opinion.

Pathway options

Pathways are like stepping-stones into your preferred course, and there’s lots of different options. The most common pathway is via a related course at your preferred university.

For example, if you missed out on a spot in physiotherapy, you can study a related course. If your marks are good – and there is a place available – you can apply to transfer across to physiotherapy in your second year of study. There are no guarantees, but these options mean the door isn’t completely closed if you don’t get in the first time.

Another popular pathway is to enrol at an alternative campus, then transfer. You’ll find that some of La Trobe’s regional campuses have equivalent courses with slightly lowered ATAR requirements.

That’s not a reflection of the quality of the course, explains Luke. ‘It just comes down to competitiveness and how many people want to get in.’ Transfers depend on your academic performance and places available in your desired course.

Even if you achieved an ATAR  that’s too low to enrol in an undergraduate degree, you have options. VET or TAFE pathways allow you to start your study in an officially recognised diploma, obtain the credit you need, and then transfer across to the course of your choice. TAFE and VET pathways also apply if you studied VCAL instead of VCE, or you don’t satisfy a prerequisite for a particular course.

‘If you achieve a good enough mark in that diploma, you may have credit officially recognised by the time you’re ready to study at La Trobe,’ explains Luke.

With so many pathway options, making your next move after receiving your ATAR can be overwhelming. That’s why it’s important to seek out as much advice as you can. While career teachers are a great resource within a school, Luke suggests future students should consider getting in touch with the university admissions team.

‘If you’re really interested in studying at La Trobe, organise a one-on-one consultation, because we have that up-to-date advice about which pathway would be best for the student.’

Book a one-on-one consultation to find out how you can get into your dream course.

This article was orginally published on NEST.

Another world ranking rise for La Trobe

La Trobe University has continued to improve its world ranking, today recording its best ever result in the respected Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU).

La Trobe University is now rated at 301 in the world, a leap of more than 200 places in just two years – to be Australia’s most improved university.

The record ARWU result in its 50th year places La Trobe in the top 1.4 per cent of universities globally.

The University has now cemented its position in the top 400 of all three major world university rankings. The latest QS ranking has the University at 360 in the world. The Times currently ranks La Trobe at 377.

Vice-Chancellor Professor John Dewar said the string of pleasing results was testament to La Trobe University’s incredible research capabilities and staff expertise, combined with close connections to industry and employers.

“The numbers speak for themselves – La Trobe is well regarded as a quality institution with a focus on excellence, industry engagement, student employability and research on issues that matter,” he said.

“We have a great team spread throughout all of our campuses. We continue to attract strong interest from around the world and across the country from high-profile academics wanting to join the team and students coming here in search of the best possible preparation for a successful career.”

La Trobe has risen from 21 in Australia to 15 over the past two years.

The ARWU ranks universities with several indicators of academic or research performance, including alumni and staff winning Nobel Prizes and Fields Medals, highly cited researchers, papers published in Nature and Science, papers indexed in major citation indices, and the per capita academic performance of an institution.

This post was originally posted on the La Trobe University web pages.

National Innovation Forum: Call for Best Practice Case Studies


For more information on the forthcoming LBS Northlink National Innovation Forum, see the conference website.

The focus of the LBS/NORTH Link National Innovation Forum is on delivering international and national speakers, and case studies, of successful university-industry collaboration, including examples of business incubators and accelerators. It is an opportunity to engage with industry and government perspectives on how we can continue to improve university-industry interactions and engagement, particularly for startups and SMEs in the Australian context.

We are now calling for case studies on the themes of the Forum. Case studies will be reviewed by the Forum academic panel, and those accepted will be made available to Forum participants. The best two case studies will be selected for presentation in a session at the Forum.

The deadline for submissions of abstracts is Monday 28 August 2017. A template is available via the corresponding Eventbrite page. Please submit the case studies through the online submission form.

If you have any questions, please contact Tim Marjoribanks.

Forum Themes

  • The role of incubators, accelerators and TTOs (Technology Transfer Offices) in facilitating sustained university-industry innovation and engaging startups and SMEs
  • Understanding the global forces shaping opportunities for business innovation (including for startups and SMEs) over the coming decade
  • Business perspectives on enablers and barriers to university-industry collaboration
  • Developing innovative ecosystems and facilitating their leadership and coordination
  • Regulation and legal framework of the innovation ecosystem (patent law, licensing, federal and state jurisdictions and university policies)
  • The economic, political and societal framework in which businesses and universities operate (incentives, competitiveness, regulation, competition policy, innovation and technology policy)

Important dates

  • Monday 28 August for case study submissions
  • Friday 1 September acceptance notification to successful authors
  • 27/28 September National Innovation Forum

Background

The Federal Government flagged innovation in Australia as a major policy focus with its $1.1 billion National Science and Innovation Agenda in November 2015. A central element of the statement was to substantially increase university-industry collaboration on the basis that such alliances have become a prominent feature of the knowledge-based economy, dealing with the speed of transformation, and economic disruption. The statement also recognised that Australia lags behind university-industry partnerships internationally and in translating research into commercial outcomes (i.e. innovation efficiency).

 

Innovate or Perish! – Australia’s Innovation System


For more information on the forthcoming LBS Northlink National Innovation Forum, see the conference website. Early Bird tickets available until 31 August 2017.

Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice, Economics

Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice, Economics

LBS Professor of Practice in Economics, Dr Mark Cloney, questions popular reports that Australia performs badly in industry-university collaboration and innovation when compared to other OECD countries.

Australia, like the rest of the global economy, is facing significant structural change in the coming decades which offers both challenges and opportunities. Some suggest 40 per cent of today jobs will no longer exist in 10 years and that changing technology (robotics and artificial intelligence etc.) and new business models will continue to disrupt ‘old’ business processes and structures. Others say that this same disruption will also create new growth markets. So is Australia’s innovation glass half full or half empty?

One strategy in meeting challenges and opportunities is adopting continuous innovation and the uptake of innovative skills and technologies. Continual innovation results in new markets, mindsets, skills and organisational re-design which are critical drivers of productivity and growth. According to Universities Australia (2017), universities are central to skilling and upskilling the next generation of Australian entrepreneurs and startups and thereby improving Australia’s innovation system and sustainable growth. Its research finds that more than four in five Australian startup founders are university graduates (Universities Australia, 2017, p.3) and that startups were the largest contributor to job creation in Australia in the last decade (Universities Australia, 2017 p.8).

However,  the health of Australia’s innovation system remains subject to conjecture and contrasting opinions with, for example, Australia sitting at the bottom of OECD (2015) rankings in terms of university-industry collaboration. Moreover, according to Global Innovation Index (2017), Australia slid further down the world rankings in terms of innovation inputs and outputs from 19 to 23 in the latest world rankings among 127 countries (Cornell University, INSEAD, and WIPO, 2017). Is this really the case?

A report by IP Australia challenges the notion that Australia is at the bottom of the OECD university-industry collaboration index arguing that this finding is based on poor data selection. For example, when you focus on patent applications filed by an Australian university with a collaborator (business partner) Australia moves to the middle of comparable international tables (IP Australia, 2017). Moreover, the city of Melbourne, home to nine universities, was recently named as the ‘most intelligent community’ in the world at the Intelligent Community Forum in New York in June 2017. Based on six intelligent community indicators the New York think tank pointed to Melbourne’s broadband speed, research institutions, new innovation precincts and its focus on sustainability as its major strengths.

Concerns over the performance of Australia’s innovation system caused the Federal Government to undertake a Senate Inquiry (2014) and then flag innovation as a major policy focus when it announced its $1.1 billion National Science and Innovation Agenda (Commonwealth of Australia, 2015). A central element of that policy statement was to substantially increase university-industry collaboration on the basis that such alliances internationally have become a prominent feature of the knowledge-based economy, dealing with the speed of transformation and economic disruption.

The challenge seems to be that Australian universities specialise in innovative research to answer fundamental questions, while businesses have specialist skills in commercialising and implementing products, services and ideas. However, university research can be often disconnected from the innovative needs of business (e.g. startups and SMEs) and not-for-profits.

So is there a disconnect? If so, why the disconnect? Or, are we doing better than we think?

LBS in partnership with NORTH Link is exploring these questions at its National Innovation Forum to be held over September 28 – 29, 2017 at its Bundoora Campus. The Forum offers a unique opportunity not only to hear from recognised national and international thinkers and business leaders on the topic of innovation and university-business collaboration but to also engage with them in Q&A. Two of the speakers, Dr Benjamin Mitra-Kahn, chief economist at IP Australia, and Dr Charles Day, CEO of Office of Innovation and Science Australia, will explore the current health of Australia’s innovation system in some detail. The Forum also presents industry and academic perspectives on how we can continue to improve innovation through university-industry interactions and engagement, particularly for startups and small to medium size enterprises (SMEs) through the use of business accelerators and incubators.

The Forum will no doubt provide new insights on whether Australia’s innovation glass is indeed half full or half empty.

References:

Commonwealth of Australia (2015), National Innovation & Science Agenda: Welcome to the Ideas Boom, Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet.

Cornell University, INSEAD, and WIPO (2017), The Global Innovation Index 2017: Innovation Feeding the World, Ithaca, Fontainebleau, and Geneva.

IP Australia (2017), Australian Intellectual Property Report 2017, Commonwealth of Australia (https://www.ipaustralia.gov.au/ip-report-2017).

OECD (2015), OECD Innovation Strategy 2015: An Agenda for Policy Action, October 2015.

Universities Australia (2017), Startup Smarts: Universities and the Startups Economy, University Australia, March, universitiesaustralia.edu.au

Panel Event: Better Out Than In Panel Event

La Trobe University, the AFLPA and Beyondblue present research and individual stories of courage at an exclusive panel event aimed at reducing the stigma around discussing men’s mental health.

Moderated by: Nick Dal Santo, 300 game ex-AFL player

Panel: Andrew Thorpe (Beyondblue), Dr Paul O’Halloran (La Trobe University), Jake Edwards (Outside The Locker Room).

Tea and coffee provided at the conclusion of the panel discussion.

Panel Event

Date: Thu. 27 July 2017

Time: 10am – 11:30am

Venue: Odeon Room, La Trobe University, Melbourne Campus, Plenty Road, Melbourne.

Register: Please register via Eventbrite.

Innovative Teaching is Rewarded

At La Trobe Business School, Teaching Awards and Teaching Support Staff Awards in our College reflect the extent to which our academics are able to make a real difference to student satisfaction and experience.  This year, there were five College Teaching Awards: LBS staff picked up three of the five awards in total.  In addition to the College Academic Staff Teaching Awards, the College also recognises the important role tutors and casual teaching support staff play in supporting academics to deliver a quality student experience. This year LBS staff picked up two of the four awards made.

Winners of the teaching awards were:

Peter Matheis (Entrepreneurship, Innovation & Marketing) for developing effective, engaging and innovative approaches to student learning and collaborative teaching initiatives in Marketing through blended flip-class room designs and resource curricula development

Esin Ozdil (Accounting and Data Analytics) for implementing diverse and timely formal and informal evaluation techniques that improve teaching and enhance students learning experience and engagement in different subject delivery modes

Seema Miglani and Biserka Siladi (Accounting and Data Analytics) for the development and delivery of a multi-campus, third year core subject using blended-learning technologies and resulting in improved levels of students’ satisfaction and understanding of real-word issues of auditing and assurance.

Winners for the Teacher Support Staff  category were:

Muhammad Saqib Manzoor (Economics & Finance) for the effective development of learning materials and co-developing assignments that engage and stimulate students as reflected by the high students satisfaction scores

Saedi Khosroshahi (Economics & Finance) for stimulating the students’ curiosity, encouraging critical thinking and promoting effective communication.

 

Professor Muhammad Yunus’s visit to the LBS Yunus Centre to be broadcast on Channel 31 on July 24th!

On 7 April 2017, Professor Muhammad Yunus visited La Trobe University. In a ceremony held at La Trobe’s Hoogenraad Lecture Theatre, Professor Yunus received an Honorary Doctorate from Vice-Chancellor Professor John Dewar and officially opened the Yunus Social Business Centre at La Trobe Business School.

On 24 July 2017 at 8.30pm, a recording of this significant honorary doctorate ceremony and address will be broadcast on Channel 31. The ceremony, recorded in two parts, will also be available for streaming on the channel’s online platform, C31 online (available via the Channel 31 website).

The three zeroes         

Professor Muhammad Yunus is widely known for his progressive theories surrounding microcredit and for founding Grameen Bank, an innovative institution which has enabled impoverished entrepreneurs to access an affordable loan scheme and start a business.

Through social business, Professor Dr Yunus has set out to create a world with three zeroes: zero poverty, zero unemployment and zero carbon emissions through social business. “All humans are entrepreneurs,” Dr Yunus said during his presentation. “If you can think of a problem to solve through a business you can set up that can get five people out of welfare, your effort is already worth it.”

Attendees to the invite-only event included of key stakeholders included the La Trobe Business School staff, members of the business community, stakeholders and collaborators of the LBS Yunus Social Business Centre, and the La Trobe Asia community.

Programme details

Date: 24 July 2017

Programme time: 8.30pm

Platform: Channel 31, on television and online.

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