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La Trobe Business School presents: The 7th Behavioural Finance and Capital Markets Conference

The Behavioural Finance and Capital Markets Conference’s objective is to facilitate the dissemination and generation of research on topical problems in Finance that are addressed from various perspectives.

The La Trobe Business School is pleased to present the 7th Behavioural Finance and Capital Markets conference.   Bringing together finance scholars and practitioners and research students to participate in and partake in the presentation of state-of-the-art research in the fields of Behavioural Finance, Experimental Finance and Capital Markets/Market Microstructure.  The event will be held on the City Campus of La Trobe University in 360 Collins Street, Melbourne on Monday and Tuesday 25-26 of September 2017. A tour of selected boutique Yarra Valley wineries after the Conference on Wednesday 27 September will offer an opportunity for informal networking.

The keynote speakers are two of the best scholars in Financial Economics and Market Design, distinguished internationally, and both with plenty of experience and interactions with the industry. They are Prof. Jacob Goeree (Scientia Professor, Director AGORA Centre for Market Design UNSW,  previously from Caltech and the University of Zurich) and Prof. Peter Bossaerts (The University of Melbourne, Professor of Experimental Finance and Decision Neuroscience Honorary Fellow, Florey Institute for Neuroscience and Mental Health, previously from California Institute of Technology). This year, the conference will also feature a unique Finance Industry Forum on the role of digital technology in financial markets. The panel is titled ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: Innovations, Disruptive Technologies and the Impact of the Digital Revolution on the Finance Industry’.

Date: Monday 25 September 2017 09:00 am until Wednesday 27 September 2017 05:00 pm (Add to calendar)

Contact:
Conference team (BFCM@latrobe.edu.au)

Cost:
See below for more information

Register:
Please book via this link

Call for Papers

Potential conference presenters are required to submit two electronic copies of their paper with the file name labelled as the full title of the manuscript (no author details are to be included within file name).

Submission details are as follows:

  1. Abstract: Presentation title, authors’ names, short abstract of about 100 words, primary or presenting author’s name, title, affiliation, email and address must appear on the first page with all additional authors and their affiliations. The file format is to be Microsoft Word only (.doc).
  2. Paper: In the full version of the paper all identifiable information of any author(s) must be excluded from the text and properties of the file saved as a pdf (.pdf) format.

Best Paper Awards

  • AU$1,500 for best paper sponsored by Capital Markets CRC
  • AU$1,500 for the best paper using SIRCA data sponsored by SIRCA
  • AU$1,500 for the best practical Behavioural Finance research paper sponsored by the CFA Institute Asia Pacific
  • US$1,000 for the best paper on Asia Pacific Capital Markets sponsored by Elsevier
  • AU$1,500 for best paper presented by a PhD student sponsored by Amery Partners Investment Management

Submission Guidelines

Papers must be submitted by email before 9 July 2017.

Key Dates

Closing date for paper submissions – 16 July 2017

Notification of acceptance – 19 July 2017

Registration deadline for accepted authors – 16 August 2017

Registration Fees

Faculty/Practitioner full conference registration (incl. of dinner and wine tour – AU$400)

Faculty/Practitioner single day registration (Day 1 or Day 2) conference registration – AU$150

Faculty/Practitioner (Partner) Gala Dinner or Yarra Valley wine tour registration – AU$120

PhD student full conference registration (incl. of dinner and wine tour – AU$200)

PhD student single day (Day 1 or Day 2: 9am-8pm) academic ticket – AU$75

PhD student Dinner (Day 1) or Yarra Valley wine tour registration (Day 3) – AU$100

Register: Please book via this link

TEN TAX TIPS FOR STUDENTS? [1]

Mark Morris La Trobe Business School Professor of Practice

By Mark Morris

Few student welcome the prospect of preparing and lodging an income tax return with the Australian Taxation Office (the ATO).

However, where the income tax deducted from a student’s job exceeds the total income tax payable for the tax year the only way in which a student can obtain a refund of overpaid tax is by lodging an income tax return.

Of course, other students will be legally required to lodge a return and pay tax where insufficient income tax been retained from their salary, or where they derive other categories of assessable income on which they owe tax.

We have developed ten tax tips to help you decide whether you need to lodge an income return for the year ended 30 June 2017, and how to prepare a return if you have too.

1. Are you an Australian tax resident?

The first step is to work out if you are an Australian resident for Australian income tax purposes.

If you were born in Australia and continue to live here, you will be regarded as an Australian resident for income tax purposes as this is the country in which you reside.

However, it is important for international students to recognise that being a resident for Australian tax purposes is quite different to being a permanent resident for Australian immigration purposes, and that they may sometimes unknowingly be an Australian tax resident.

Very broadly, an international student may be regarded as residing in Australia if they are here for such a period of time that their behavior reflects a degree of continuity, routine or habit that is consistent with residing in Australia.

Whilst it is a question of fact in each case as a broad rule of thumb the ATO takes the view that living in Australia for six months is a period of time which is generally consistent with a person residing here for tax purposes.

For example, in one of the ATO’s binding public taxation rulings it held that an overseas student who came to Australia to attend a pre-arranged 4-year university course was an Australian resident even though he left after 6 months to return to his home country following a family illness as his living and working arrangements whilst in Australia were consistent with someone whose pattern of behavior was that they resided in Australia[2].

Accordingly, if you are unsure whether you are an Australian resident for income tax purposes you should contact the ATO or a registered tax agent to obtain more clarity as to whether or not you are an Australian resident in working out your tax rights and obligations.

2. What happens if you are an Australian tax resident?

Assuming you are regarded as an Australian resident for tax purposes what are some of the key tax implications you need to consider.

On the plus side you will be entitled to a tax free threshold which will mean that you do not pay any income tax for the year ended 30 June 2017 if your total taxable income was $18,200 or less.

Accordingly, if you worked part time and derived salary income from which income tax was deducted by your employer you will be able to obtain a tax refund of any Pay As You Go (PAYG) tax retained from your salary income if your total taxable income was $18,200 or less.

In practice, most individual resident taxpayers will also usually be entitled to a tax credit being the low income tax offset which means that no tax will typically be payable if that person’s taxable income is below $20,542. However, the amount of this this tax offset reduces tax payable but is not in itself refundable.

On the negative side you will be subject to tax on all your assessable income for the year ended 30 June 2017 regardless of where it was sourced. For example, an overseas student would need to include both their Australian salary income and any interest income earned in a bank account held in their home country.

In addition, Australian residents are subject to a 2% Medicare levy but only where their taxable income exceed certain thresholds.

By contrast a non-resident is only taxable on assessable income which has an Australian source being generally locally derived investment income. However, such income will be subject to tax at a rate of 32.5% for any taxable income derived up to $87,000 as there is no tax-free threshold for non-resident individuals.

3. What do I need if I want to lodge a return for the 2017 year?

Most students who have been employed would have already been issued a tax file number which is a prerequisite for every individual lodging an income tax return.

If for some reason you are lodging a return but do not have a tax file number you will need to apply for one from the ATO either directly or by using a registered tax agent.

You should then collate all the records and information you will need to prepare you income tax return including, amongst others, any payment summary, bank interest statements, dividend slips, invoices and receipts.

Assuming you have a tax file number you may consider preparing and lodging your income tax return on-line using the ATO’s myTax product if your tax affairs are reasonably simple. Further details on myTax can be found here.

Otherwise it may be prudent to contact a registered tax agent to ensure you identify all your entitlements and to ensure that your income tax return is correctly prepared.

Regardless of how you lodge your return you will need to disclose full bank account details when preparing your income tax return if you expect to receive a tax refund.

4. What types of income need to be included in your return?

As discussed, as an Australian resident you will be taxed on all of your assessable income wherever it is derived.

Some of the more common types of assessable income include the following:

  • Salary and wages (whether as a full-time, part-time or casual employee);
  • Allowances and bonuses (where received during the 2017 income year);
  • Tips and gratuities (such as those received working in hospitality jobs);
  • Fees received as an independent contractor under a contract for service;
  • Any business income derived during the year (not being income derived from carrying on a hobby);
  • Australian government payments and allowances including, amongst others, Newstart allowance, youth allowance, AuStudy payments and certain other educational and training allowances;
  • Interest income;
  • Dividend income (including the amount of any franking credit tax offset for any franking credit attached to a dividend paid by an Australian resident company);
  • Any distributions received as a beneficiary from a family trust or as a partner in a partnership; and
  • Capital gains arising from the disposal of certain CGT assets (which is a highly complex area requiring specialist expertise).

The total of such assessable income may be reduced by eligible deductions which may take the form of work-related deductions, self-education expenses in certain circumstances and personal deductions.

5. What type of work-related deductions can you claim?

You may be entitled to claim a deduction for expenses directly incurred in the course of gaining or producing your assessable income. However, you will not be able to claim an outright deduction which is capital in nature although you may be able depreciate certain capital assets like a computer over time for tax purposes where it has been used for the purpose of gaining or producing assessable income. In addition, you will not be entitled to claim a deduction for expenditure which is private in nature such as the cost of conventional clothing (e.g. suits) purchased for work purposes.

Some of the more common types of deductions you may be able to claim are as follows:

  • Work-related subscription and union fees;
  • Protective clothing and certain work uniforms (including compulsory work uniforms required by your employer);
  • Home office expenses (where you are required to work at home after hours and have a separate room allocated in your home study for that purpose);
  • Employment related telephone mobile and internet costs; and
  • Travel expenses between worksites (but excluding travel between home and work)).

You may also be entitled to claim a deduction for the cost of tools of trade, briefcases and calculators costing less than $300 to the extent to which you use it for work-related purposes.

However, you will only generally be able to claim any work related expenses costing $300 or more if you have retained all the relevant invoices and receipts.

6. When are self-education costs allowable?

Broadly, self-education expenses are only deductible to the extent that the course of study undertaken will either maintain or improve your skills in your current occupation.

Accordingly, you will not be entitled to claim the costs of your course if you’ve not yet embarked on a particular career. Nor will you be able to claim such costs if you have decided to change careers and have incurred such expenses in studying a new area of expertise.

However, you will be able to claim a deduction for self-education expenses where the study or training you are undertaking is likely to enhance your chances of promotion or increase your income earning capacity in your existing occupation.

Further details as to when self-education expenses are allowable or not are set out in Taxation Ruling TR98/9 which can be downloaded here.

Eligible self-education costs include, amongst others, course fees, textbooks, stationary, travel costs and the depreciation of items such as laptops, tablets and printers. However, it is necessary to add back $250 of any self-education expenses as being non-allowable.

Finally, any Higher Education Loan Program (HELP) repayments are non-deductible.

7. What other personal deductions may be allowable?

Donations of $ 2 dollars or more to a deductible gift recipient (e.g. a charity like the Red Cross) will be allowable provided you have kept copies of receipts for any gifts made.

You can also claim a deduction for any fee paid to a registered tax agent during the year ended 30 June 2017 for the cost of managing your tax affairs. However, any amount paid to a registered tax agent to assist you in in preparing your 2017 income tax return will only be deductible in the year ended 30 June 2018.

8. What tax offsets can you claim?

Whilst tax deductions may reduce assessable income tax offsets are directly applied as a credit to reduce tax payable.

Certain tax offsets may also result in a refund to the extent that the tax credit exceeds tax payable.

The most common tax offsets that a student may claim include the beneficiary tax offset, the franking credit tax offset and the small business tax offset.

A beneficiary tax offset may be available where a student receives a Newstart allowance, youth allowance, Austudy payments and certain other Commonwealth education or training programs.

The calculation of this offset can be complex but this offset may not only reduce tax payable on the amount of Government benefits received but also assessable income received from other sources.

Further details on the beneficiary tax offset can be found here.

A resident company may pass on a tax credit for tax it has paid to shareholders when it pays such shareholders a franked dividend. Such a tax credit can be claimed as a franking credit tax offset which may also result in a tax refund where the franking credit exceeds tax payable.

Finally, where a student is also carrying on a business that individual may be entitled to the small business income tax offset for the year ended 30 June 2017 being 8% of the income tax payable on the portion of an individual’s taxable income that is ‘total net small business income’ provided the aggregated turnover of the business is less than $5million.

However, an individual is only able to claim one small business tax offset for an income year irrespective of the number of sources of small business income derived by that individual and the maximum amount of the offset is capped to $1,000 per year. The application of this offset is also quite complex and specialist advice should be sought if you intend to claim it.

9. What are some of the potential traps to watch out for?

There are special rules to discourage adults from splitting income with their children (i.e. minors) aged under 18 at the end of the year unless that minor is engaged in a full-time occupation, receives a carer allowance, disability support pension or double orphan pension or a person who is disabled or a beneficiary under a special disability trust.

Where the minor is subject to these special rules, penalty tax rates apply to such children receiving dividends, interest, rent, royalties or a family trust distribution.

Where such income is between $417 and $1,307 tax will be paid on the excess of income over $416 at a rate of 68% whilst any amount of such income in excess of $1,307 will be subject to tax at a rate of 47%.

10. Where do I go for help?

If you believe that you required to lodge an income tax return or that you may wish to lodge a return in order to obtain your tax refund, you may wish to either contact the ATO or look at their website for more details at www.ato.gov.au

Should you want to get independent tax advice then try to locate an accountant who has the tax expertise to makes sure you lodge a correct income tax return but make sure that the accountant is also a registered tax agent who has been legally authorised to provide such services.

And if you are entitled to a tax refund go get what is yours!

[1] Latrobe University has used reasonable care and skill in compiling the content of this general commentary. However, it should not be relied upon as advice in any circumstances, and no warranty is provided by either the University or the author concerning the accuracy and completeness of these materials. Accordingly, they disclaim all and any liability to any person in respect of reliance on any of the matters raised in these materials, and professional advice should be sought from an appropriately qualified registered tax agent where required.

[2] Refer to Example 8 of Taxation Ruling TR98/17.

Higher Degree Research Team Wins Prestigious International Scholarship

Anahita Amirsardari , PhD Scholarship student at La Trobe Business School (LBS), and  her PhD Supervisor, Professor Alex Maritz recently received  a prestigious international scholarship, funded by the Federal Government of Germany. Referred to as the DAAD project ‘GradUS Global’, the international PhD research exchange program will take place at Saarland University in Southern Germany. This research program aims to support international mobility, cooperation and exchange between La Trobe University, Saarland University and the German Higher Degree Research Ecosystem.

This is a unique opportunity as this program involves both Professor (supervisor) and PhD student as part of the research exchange, in order to integrate transdisciplinary competencies with supervisors and students in the field of Entrepreneurship & Innovation between LTU and Saarland University. This opportunity also allows enhancing research scholarship experience and networks, through connecting supervisors and students between LTU and Saarland University.

Furthermore, Professor Alex Maritz will provide insights on contemporary issues of entrepreneurship research, including:

  • Recent Developments in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Research
  • Entrepreneurship and Innovation Research for PhD Students: How to Publish
  • Fostering Meaningful Collaboration between Supervisors, Professors and Researchers

This joint international collaboration between the PhD Students at LTU and Saarland University will also lead to research cooperation on Ana Amirsardari’s investigation of the relation between entrepreneurial intentions and entrepreneurial behaviour in the context of new venture creation.

The exchange program will further enhance research and engagement cooperation and collaboration between La Trobe Business School and Saarland University.

Developing Future Public Sector Leaders – International Day of the World’s Indigenous People

screen-shot-2016-08-02-at-10-32-18

August 9th is the International Day of the World’s Indigenous People, a day to promote and protect the rights of the world’s indigenous populations. Last June, examples from schools across Australia, Canada and New Zealand and the work that they are doing to engage Indigenous students and promote Indigenous businesses were featured on the Prime Time Blog, including an Aboriginal EMBA at Beedie School of Business, a programme to support Indigenous Entrepreneurs at Gustavson School of Business, the Indigenous Programmes Unit at University of New South Wales, contextualizing the MBA with an Indigenous focus at the University of Waikato, promoting accounting as a career choice with Indigenous students at Deaken University and mentoring a new generation of Indigenous leaders at University of Wollongong. The Primetime blog is connected to the Principles of Responsible Management and Education and aims to share best practices on how to mainstream sustainability and responsible leadership into management education globally. The blog serves as a platform to share and discuss inspirational activities that promote the development of responsible leaders.

Recently, they featured La Trobe Business School’s innovative programme focused on developing future Indigenous business leaders in the Public sector. Gisselle Weybrecht spoke with Dr Suzanne Young Head of Department of Management and Marketing and Dr Geraldine Kennett, Professor of Practice, Department of Management & Marketing about their new programme.

 What is the programme for public servants?

La Trobe Business School developed a new Graduate Certificate in Management (Public Sector) in partnership with the Institute of Public Administration of Australia (IPAA), and in consultation with the IPAA Indigenous Advisory Committee. Initially enrolling 32 Indigenous public servants, the course has now expanded to be a combination of Indigenous and Non-Indigenous public sector professionals learning together. The course takes 1.5 years full-time or 2 years part time.

This innovative course uses a partnership approach; the participants study leadership, entrepreneurial business planning, financial management and accounting with the University and public policy making with the Institute of Public Administration of Australia.  The students develop a plan for an entrepreneurial business or policy idea in their first subject and then build on this plan in subsequent subjects, cumulating in ‘A Pitch’ to senior public sector leaders.  This practical form of assessment builds their confidence to get strategic buy-in for their business and/or policy ideas. Many of the students have used their new learning and skills to achieve higher level positions in the public sector. Four students are also continuing their studies with the La Trobe University MBA programme in 2016.

As academics we have gained knowledge about Indigenous culture and how to integrate social identity into learning styles which has enabled us to develop supportive pedagogy for teaching.  Our course ensures that the learning outcomes support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with the capacity to straddle their leadership obligations in the workplace as well as in the Indigenous community.

 How did it come about?

In 2010 the Australian government highlighted the social, political and economic gap between Indigenous Australians and the rest of the community. The Review of Higher Education Access and Outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (2012) argues that improving higher education outcomes among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people will contribute to nation building and reduce Indigenous disadvantage.

The need for a postgraduate qualification for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Public Servants was highlighted as important in a study IPAA Victoria commissioned with PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC). The study highlighted the barriers to, and enablers of, career advancement for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders employed in the public sector including the need for professional development opportunities. Indigenous public servants experience a higher turnover rate than their non-indigenous peers. The 2012-13 Australian Public Service State of the Sector report found that 20.5% of indigenous employees left the APS after less than one year  — almost four times the rate of non-indigenous employees (5.9%). This is another part the challenge this programme aims to tackle.

IPAA approached La Trobe Business School to develop and conduct a post graduate course due to its expertise in providing higher education for Aboriginal people, its status as the United Nations Principles of Responsible Management Education (PRME) Champion Business school in Australia and the ability for regional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Public Servants to continue their higher education at La Trobe University’s regional campuses across our region.

 What have been some of the successes?

From the feedback loop it is clear that the project produces measurable impact for Indigenous peoples (including students and community), La Trobe University (including staff), IPAA, and the higher education sector.

Achievements to date include:

  • Initial enrolment of 32 students into the course
  • Strong retention rate with 22 students continuing into their 3rd subject
  • Employers contributing to student fees
  • Orientation programme and guidelines for delivery of Indigenous education
  • Second cohort of programme began in late 2015 consisting of Indigenous and Non-Indigenous students
  • Students’ management skills enhanced in entrepreneurship and innovation, accounting and leadership
  • Students’ leadership skills enhanced in communication and team work
  • Peer and collaborative learning enhancing cross cultural learning between students and staff and in the future between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous students.
  • Four students progressing through to enrolment in the MBA

 

For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students it provides an educational experience and improved educational outcomes and opportunities for employment and career advancement. A specific Indigenous course enables Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to bring their culture and identity into the learning experience, thereby making the teaching relevant for their needs. Also for Indigenous communities, it supports economic development, assists in closing the gap and provides mechanisms for breaking the cycle of Indigenous disadvantage.

Do you have any advice for schools thinking of doing something similar?

It is important to develop and work in partnerships with those organisations and people in the community who are legitimately recognised with expertise by Indigenous peoples. It is also important to have orientation programs for teaching staff in Indigenous culture and nurturing this in the teaching environment. Flexibility of approach, and assessments that are meaningful and authentic to the Indigenous students are also important.

What are the next Steps for La Trobe Business School in this area?

The course is now open for non-indigenous students as well to provide a culturally safe learning environment for students to be able to learn together. This enhances the learning of non-indigenous students who are all practising public servant professionals and so builds their knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and the importance of culturally safe practices.  This also provides an environment where cross cultural knowledge is exchanged and others’ perspectives are more fully understood.

 

This article was originally published, here.

 

 

 

 

Can Economics Improve People’s Wellbeing?

jan Libich La Trobe Business

jan Libich La Trobe BusinessLBS economist Jan Libich has a mission. He has been determined to show that economics, often referred to as the dismal science, can be very useful in helping us improve our lives. His newly published book ‘Real-World Economic Policy: Insights from Leading Australian Economists’ is a culmination of his effort so far. It bridges the gap between academic economists, policymakers, students and the general public by exploring how influential economists – including four former central bank Governors/Board members, an ACCC Commissioner, and a current member of the federal parliament and Shadow Minister – use economic research to develop and evaluate policy.

When asked what constitutes this gap between economists and the general public, Jan Libich’s passion for economics shows: “Economics is often portrayed as divorced from the real world; it is criticized for being about boring curve-shifting, equations and heartless definitions. The book attempts to show that such image is not accurate, that economics can help people and policymakers to make better decisions and thus improve their prosperity.”

Real-World Economic Policy: Insights from Leading Australian Economists is based on a series of one-hour video-interviews the author recorded from 2011–2014 , aiming to help the reader identify welfare-improving policies in areas including healthcare, education, retirement financing, monetary and fiscal policies, banking regulation and climate change. Libich explains: “We all make hundreds of decisions every day. Economics attempts to understand how we make them, and whether we can perhaps improve on our decision making to achieve our goals (whatever they may be: economics does not prescribe that money is all we should care about). The same is true at the country level, whereby the quality of public policies can have a major impact on people’s wellbeing.”

In Jan Libich’s eyes, research in economics has been getting more mathematical over time to enable a more rigorous and objective examination of the economy: “It is about discipline, it is easier to see a flaw in logic when one has to clearly state all the assumptions rather than just use verbal arguments. Together with improvements in computing power this enabled exploration of more complicated models and environments.”

However, these developments have also created a gap between what academic research can teach us and what policymakers in government and the general public can understand. “To me, this implies that academic economists need to pay more attention to communicating their findings and recommendations in an understandable and convincing fashion. And to be honest, we have not done that as well as we should have,” Libich says. “My book is a humble attempt in this direction.”

More information on ‘Real-World Economic Policy: Insights from Leading Australian Economists’ can be obtained here.

ISBN: 9780170364386, Published by Cengage Learning Australia, Pub Date: November 2015, © 2016

Gallery Gala Evening, hosted by La Trobe Bendigo and The OTIS Foundation

Otis Gallery La Trobe Business School

Third year La Trobe Bachelor of Business (Event Management and Marketing) students have joined forces with The OTIS Foundation to host a Gallery Gala Evening on Thursday 15th of October 2015.

Abstract

This Gallery Gala Evening event will mark the commencement of what is anticipated to be a long term relationship between La Trobe Bendigo and The OTIS Foundation. This relationship will provide students with the opportunity to work within their chosen industry, whilst supporting a great cause.  The team comprising third year La Trobe Bachelor of Business (Event Management and Marketing) students Grace Jeffrey, Steph Mika, Lauren Nesbit and Isabella Welton made the successful bid to hold the event for The OTIS Foundation.

The Gallery Gala Evening to be held at the Bendigo Art Gallery Cafe is expected to attract over 250 young professionals and business leaders. The evening will provide networking opportunities within the Bendigo business community.

The OTIS Foundation is a charity organisation that supports individuals with breast cancer.  Its aim is to reduce the psychological impact on people living with breast cancer, and their families and communities, through the provision of a national network of quality retreats provided at no accommodation cost.

Throughout the evening attendees have the opportunity to network, watch the creation of an artwork for sale on the night, enjoy live music and win some fantastic auction prizes or try their luck in our raffle, with all funds raised on the night going directly to The OTIS Foundation. Tickets are $50 per person and include canapés and refreshments. Just buying a ticket helps provide an overnight ‘stay’ for a guest living with breast cancer at an OTIS retreat.

The flyer for the event can be accessed, here.

Date: 15 October 2015

Time: 5.30pm – 7.30pm

Venue: Bendigo Art Gallery, Gallery Cafe, 42 View Street, Bendigo, VIC 3550.

RSVP: Tickets can be purchased via this link.

 

 

‘A Leg up to Well-Being’: Hannah MacDougall runner up in La Trobe’s 3MT competition!

In the 2015 finals of La Trobe’s 3MT competition, Hannah MacDougall presented her PhD research as one of the finalists, and did exceptionally well in finishing as runner up. Hannah is undertaking her PhD in Sport Management in the Department of Management and Marketing in LBS, and is supervised by Dr Emma Sherry, Professor Nora Shields and Dr Paul O’Halloran.

Hannah’s PhD, which she is currently completing by publication, focuses on the topic of Athlete Well-Being. The first stage of her PhD was a systematic review that compared the well-being of Australian Para and Olympic Sport athletes. Meta-analyses revealed that Para athletes, compared with Olympic sport athletes, had lower levels of self-acceptance, indicated by athletic identity, and body-image perceptions, and differed from Olympic sport athletes in terms of their motivation, indicated by a greater mastery-oriented climate. The review also indicated a need to establish the well-being of Para and Olympic sport athletes using valid and reliable measures of well-being, as well as determine what well-being means in the Para sport context.

The second stage of Hannah‘s PhD investigated the well-being needs and strengths of Para athletes in a global and sport-specific context.  The qualitative study found that the well-being needs and strengths of Para athletes differed across gender, sport, level of competition, and nature of impairment. Well-being needs were an interaction between physical pain, emotional regulation, lacking purpose outside of sport, and a lack of self-acceptance, especially for athletes with acquired impairments. Well-being strengths were perceived to increase as athletes increased their level of competition, and included personal growth, optimism, strong social support networks, and contributing to multiple communities.

The third stage will establish the well-being levels of Para and Olympic Sport athletes, and determine if there are any significant differences between these two groups as well as significant differences between congenital and acquired Para athletes. The quantitative study was conducted through an online survey and had 309 participants. Hannah is currently in the process of analysing her data.

The fourth and final stage of her PhD will be a targeted well-being RCT for Para athletes. The RCT will be 8 x 1hr individual face-to-face sessions and focus on training attentional focus and strengthening the brain muscle of athletes. The RCT will be conducted from November 2015 – February 2016. Watch her three-minute pitch of this thesis above.

The La Trobe 3MT final was held on the 2nd of September in the John Scott Meeting House and saw 8 finalists battle it out for the right to represent La Trobe at the 3MT Tran-Tasman final held in October in Queensland. The level of competition between candidates saw extremely high quality presentations and topics range from vocal health for Aussie Basketball coaches to ‘Avoiding Robots’. With great prizes up for grabs, the people’s choice and overall winner of the La Trobe 3MT thesis went to Jen Wiltshire with her presentation on ‘Why I love dirt’.

3MT® is a research-communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ). The exercise challenges PhD candidates to present a compelling oration on their thesis topic and its significance in just three minutes. 3MT® develops academic, presentation, and research-communication skills and supports the development of research students’ capacity to effectively explain their research in language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.

La Trobe Business School would like to congratulate Hannah for her great presentation in the 3MT finals!

Emma Sherry Hannah MacDougall 3MT Finalist from La Trobe Business School a leg up to well-being

Hannah MacDougall 3MT Finalist from La Trobe Business School a leg up to well-being

 

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