Business Newsroom

La Trobe Business School

Category: News (page 1 of 12)

LBS Three Minute Thesis Competition

Piyumini (Piu) Wijenayake won this year´s LBS Three Minute Thesis Competition and Madhura Jayaratne was runner up. Congratulations to both! They will be representing the La Trobe Business School during the 3MT ASSC College finals on the 20th of August. If they make it through, they will represent the ASSC College during the university final on the 30th of August. Ultimately, the winner of the university’s final will be representing the La Trobe University during the Asia-Pacific final at the University of Queensland on the 27th of September.

What is 3MT?

The Three Minute Thesis competition (or 3MT), is an annual international competition where PhD candidates explain their research topic to a non-specialist audience in just three minutes.

There are strict rules:

  • A single static PowerPoint slide is permitted. No slide transitions, animations or ‘movement’ of any description are allowed. The slide is to be presented from the beginning of the oration.
  • No additional electronic media (e.g. sound and video files) are permitted.
  • No additional props (e.g. costumes, musical instruments, laboratory equipment) are permitted.
  • Presentations are limited to 3 minutes maximum and competitors exceeding 3 minutes are disqualified.
  • Presentations are to be spoken word (e.g. no poems, raps or songs).
  • Presentations are to commence from the stage.
  • Presentations are considered to have commenced when a presenter starts their presentation through either movement or speech.
  • The decision of the adjudicating panel is final.

Why do it?

Besides the ability to win prize money (EVERY round), graduate researchers develop presentation, research and academic communication skills. Participating in the 3MT also helps the development of candidates’ capacity to explain their work effectively.

The LBS 3MT presentations

This year, three LBS graduate researchers entered the LBS Three Minute Thesis Competition. Chi Kwan Ng presented on, “The influence of others on personal adoption of carbon reduction behaviours” and Madhura Jayaratne´s presentation was titled, “Big data fusion. Artificial Intelligence to improve our future”. Piu Wijenayake won this year’s LBS 3MT with her presentation, “How about an Artificial Hug?”. Her thesis is about how artificial intelligence & social media can help create more caring organisations. Once again congratulations!

Piu Wijenayake
Madhura Jayaratne
Chi Kwan Ng

Where and when to support our LBS graduate researchers?

  • ASSC College finals: 20 August, 10.15am, JSMH Chamber: RSVP here
  • University 3MT final: 30 August 2018, 2:15 pm, JSMH Chamber: RSVP here

 

The “Aldi way”

LBS researcher Dr Angela McCabe and Dr Tom Osegowitsch (University of Melbourne), wrote an article for The Conversation on the secret to Aldi’s success.

Aldi’s strategy

An important element of Aldi’s strategy is a severely limited range of “preselected” products, overwhelmingly private brands. The company’s smaller range (some 1,500 store-keeping units as opposed to 20,000 to 30,000 in a large Coles or Woolworths outlet) has several advantages – in terms of store footprints, warehousing infrastructure and supplier discounts, to name a few.

Strategy has limits

In embracing the “Aldi way”, the company has made hard strategic choices. But it’s turning away shoppers who value things other than what’s on offer at Aldi – larger choice, established brands, more service, plusher stores, in-store bakeries and delis or expanded fresh food sections. As a result, Aldi’s growth in Australia is going to reach its limits.

Read the full article here:

The secret to Aldi’s success is choosing what not to do

 

Angela McCabe is a Lecturer in the Department of Management, Sport and Tourism at La Trobe University. Angela McCabe’s research focuses on the mechanism of knowledge transfer and knowledge co-production in cross-sector collaboration. Her work has contributed to understanding the way in which behavioural and institutional dynamics affect teamwork and the production and dissemination of knowledge within university-industry-government networks.

Jamila Gordon – How LTU can make dreams come true

LBS alumna, Jamila Gordon, was interviewed by the Australian Institute of Company Directors (AICD). The interview shows the amazing story of a Somali refugee who is now a high profile Non-Executive Director at Jayride & Advisory Board Member at Venture Crowd. Jamila sat on the university’s Board for five years and sits now on the Board of CareerSeekers, a not-for-profit that helps refugees and asylum seekers find roles within corporate Australia.

From Somalia to La Trobe

Jamila’s family had to flee her home country because of the Somali Civil War. She stayed in Kenya with distant relatives before she met an Australia backpacker who would help her emigrate to Australia. Her dream of going to university almost fell apart when every university in Sydney rejected her. La Trobe University, known for providing educational opportunities for students from disadvantaged backgrounds, accepted Jamila. She became part of the LBS community studying a bachelor of Business (Information Technology).

In the interview Jamila talks about her journey and her career but also about how LTU taught her big-picture thinking, and mentions the great support she received from La Trobe University.

“Not only did they help me, they provided amazing support.”

Read the full article: What I’ve Learned: Jamila Gordon

LBS Innovation Series: How can universities strengthen firms’ innovative ability?

The next presentation in the LBS Innovation Series is by Dr Stephan Buse, Deputy Director of the Institute for Technology and Innovation Management (TIM) at Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH). Stephan talks about academia-industry collaboration and engagement, and how universities can strengthen firms’ innovative ability.

Frugal innovation

Stephan argues that to succeed in emerging markets, especially in powerhouses like China and India, many companies from industrialised nations have had to change their established business models. In this environment, to remain competitive, a new way of thinking and acting is required.  Frugal innovation is a strategic approach to deal with these new challenges.

According to Stephan, frugal innovation refers to products and services that seek to minimise the use of material and financial resources across the complete value chain. The objective is to substantially reduce not just price but the complete cost of ownership/usage of a product. By adopting this approach firms can develop products that bring better priced quality goods to the customer both in the Business-to-Consumer and Business-to-Business sectors. He also gives examples of strong university-industry collaboration through the use of ethnography an emerging tool used to better identify habits of consumers.

 

Watch his presentation below:

 

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics in the La Trobe Business School. The series was developed after the successful National Innovation Forum organised by La Trobe Business School, NORTH Link and Deloitte Consulting P/L.

Other blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:

LBS Innovation Series: Welcome to the 4th industrial revolution

The next presentation in the LBS Innovation Series is from Craig Scroggie, the CEO of NEXTDC, Australia’s leading Data-Centre-as-a-Service provider. Craig challenges us to think about and imagine the future through the lens of ever expanding data analytic possibilities.

Theoretical influences

Craig’s presentation is grounded in four major theoretical influences: Moore’s Law (the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits will double every year); Schumpeter Economics (i.e. the notion of creative destruction) and the books, The Lean Start-up by Eric Ries; and, The Fourth Industrial Revolution by Klaus Schwab.

Internet of Things

As Craig explains, data is the electricity of our age and the amount is doubling every two years, yet we analyse less than 1% of current global data. He tells us global internet traffic will nearly triple over the next five years, driving billions of dollars of investment in the construction of new data centres and communications networks to enable our digital lives. With the Internet of Things we’re entering a whole new era of technology with – machine learning, self-driving cars, drones, 3D printed body parts, robotics, and artificial intelligence etc. We will have new opportunities for solutions to challenges such as digital disruption, which affects areas such as medical research, sustainability, energy, education and transport. Craig suggests that more opportunities will also emerge from the convergence of technologies over time. His advice for start-ups and entrepreneurs is to develop products and services using lean methods and platforms aimed at the mobile market (not desktop computers).

 

Watch his presentation:

 

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics in the La Trobe Business School. The series was developed after the successful National Innovation Forum organised by La Trobe Business School, NORTH Link and Deloitte Consulting P/L.

Other blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:

Meet the new Dean and Head of LBS

Jane Hamilton is the new Dean & Head of the La Trobe Business School.  Business Newsroom sat down with her to ask her some questions about her long-standing relationship with LBS, her new role, taking on challenges, how she relaxes, and more.

 

 

Where do you come from and what brings you to La Trobe University?

I was a student at La Trobe University, at the Bendigo campus. Back then it was still the Bendigo College of Advanced Education, which became part of La Trobe in the 1990s. After finishing my degree I joined the staff as a tutor, and gradually worked my way up. I have been associated with La Trobe for about 30 years. I took an opportunity to work at the University of Technology in Sydney from 2000 to 2005 because I wanted more experience and exposure with my research. But after that, I came back to La Trobe because it is a great place to work.

 

How will you be approaching your new role as Head of School?

Being part of the LBS for nearly 30 years means that I’m very familiar with what we do. However, this is a new role for me so it gives me the opportunity to help LBS find a new direction for the future, and we’re working on a strategy to help us do that. We want to keep everything that’s good about LBS and build upon that. This means providing education that meets students’ expectations for the new world of work, help students get interesting jobs and prepare them for anything that might come to them in the future. I want all LBS students to have a fantastic experience with us.

In terms of research, LBS has great strengths in several areas. We have a number of research centres, and we would like to see them flourish. In particular, the two largest ones, the Centre for Sport and Social Impact and the Research Centre for Data Analytics & Cognition, are well connected with outside parties. We also have many academics that are experts in their fields and very highly rated internationally. Several of our research disciplines are rated above world standard and I would like to support them to keep continuing their good work.

Several of our staff come in as early career researchers. I would like to help them develop their skills in research so that they too can have a career in research. I would like them to have a satisfying career, feel connected within the school, have the possibility to engage with business and the community around them and allow them to produce research that is meaningful in a variety of ways. Their work might impact the way people do business, it might impact on the academic research field, or impact on people’s personal lives. There is a wide range of research happening within LBS and we need to support that to make our research output even stronger.

 

What do you know now that you wished you knew when you were a student at university?

I just loved being a student. Up until then, it was the most interesting thing that I had done, it was a joy to challenge myself and learn new things.

I wish I would have had a little bit more self-belief. When I started doing research I was so nervous about standing up in front of people and presenting my ideas. I didn’t know whether I had done a good job or not. Looking back, I did a good job and I just wish I had more confidence and more belief in myself.

 

Have you always been ambitious?

Yes and no. It’s not so much about ambition. I never thought I would be in a particular position, I wasn’t ambitious in that sense, but I do enjoy taking on new things and I think all ambitious people do. I think ambitious people enjoy the process of learning. Taking on a new position like this is where I get that joy of learning. When you’re a student all is new, and then when you’re in a job for too long it can get a bit stale, so you need to give yourself a new challenge and that’s what I like to do. You take on a challenge, you master that, and take on another challenge and you master that, and that constant stretching helps you develop.

I didn’t know that I was going to end up in this position, going from an LBS student to becoming the Dean & Head of School for LBS. It was quite a journey and I probably didn’t know what I was going to do, but every step of the way I challenged myself and took on that stretch, and it was very rewarding. I learnt this process over the years so probably if I knew this back then I would have taken more steps earlier, but that’s life.

 

What do you do to get rid of stress?

Lately I have been going for runs and I have been really enjoying it. If I don’t feel like running, I’ll go for a walk. I enjoy getting up early and going out. It helps me to get into work fresh and feel prepared for a long day ahead.

During my weekends I like to go outside and work on our bush block, walk around in nature, something like that. I don’t do very ambitious things, I like to do something that is out of work and outside. Just get basic, not having to talk to people or think about things too much. It gives me that contrast with my job.

I like to take at least one day during my weekend where I turn everything off so that I can just have that break. I work quite long days during the week, and sometimes you need to do some work on the weekend to get ready on Monday, but I do try and work really hard during the week so that I can have a bit of space on the weekend. Taking a break is important.

 

Last question, if people come across you at the coffee-machine, what’s a good conversation starter?

“Can I get you a coffee?” and I will always say yes! A simple “how are you today?” is also fine, ask me what I think of the cricket, or the footy. That will get me engaged in a conversation.

 

Professor Jane Hamilton was appointed as Dean and Head of La Trobe Business School in April 2018 and brings a wealth of experience and expertise to this important leadership position. Jane is a Professor of Accounting and holds a PhD from Monash University and a Masters of Accountancy from the University of New England, having completed her undergraduate studies in Bendigo. She brings a unique perspective to the role of Head of School, having worked at La Trobe’s Bendigo campus since 1989. Jane was Associate Head of the Business School from 2015 to 2018 and had responsibility for regional campus operations, international partnerships, and third-party teaching. As well as her experience in senior management positions, Jane has a distinguished record of teaching, research and partnership engagement at both La Trobe University and the University of Technology, Sydney.

A Dutchie on exchange at La Trobe

Business Newsroom brings you a blog written by a Dutch exchange student who studied a semester at La Trobe Business School.

 

 

Hi! My name is Pieter Siemonsma and I’m a 22-year-old exchange student from The Netherlands.

In the Netherlands I study Sports, Health and Management at Hanze University of Applied Sciences in Groningen (only a 1.5 hour from Amsterdam!). As part of my degree I could apply for a semester abroad and so I did. I wanted to improve my English language skills and broaden my Western perception further than the ideals of European countries. La Trobe University gave me both those opportunities.

At La Trobe I have been able to make so many friends and experience so many things through living on campus in one of the colleges. I attended sporting matches, went to parties and got to know Melbourne at its finest.

Through La Trobe Business School I was also able to achieve the personal goals I set before coming to Melbourne.

 

The school’s facilities were great and the teachers were always available to help.

 

Unfortunately, this chapter of my life has almost come to an end and I have to leave La Trobe after this semester.  Before heading home, I’m going to travel through this country and explore more of its beauty.

 

Coming to Australia and being part of the La Trobe community has been an unforgettable experience.

 

I will always look back at my time here with a smile and I am very thankful to La Trobe for that!

Going to Kuala Lumpur with the New Colombo Plan

Business Newsroom sat down with Associate Professor Alison Parkes, Head of Department of Accounting & Data Analytics, to talk about her visit to Kuala Lumpur where she visited New Colombo Plan students.

 

What is the New Colombo Plan?

The New Colombo Plan (NCP) is an Australian Government initiative to increase knowledge of the Indo Pacific region by supporting undergraduates to study and undertake internships. Essentially the original Colombo Plan in the 1960s & 70s brought students from South-East Asia to Australia, while the New Colombo Plan takes Australian students to South-East Asia.

The Department of Accounting & Data Analytics applied for places in the first round of funding for this program and were awarded 6 places in 2016, 8 places in 2017 and 10 places in 2018. The places are only available to high achieving Accounting students who hold Australian citizenship.

The funding involves $3000 per student to go on placement in Malaysia for 4-6 weeks. The aim is to broaden students’ view of the world and to give them a taste of living and working in Asia.

 

Alison Parkes in Kuala Lumpur with New Colombo Plan students and alumni

 

Who are the students that went to Kuala Lumpur?

The eight students were all Accounting scholars, five from Melbourne and three from regional campuses. Scholarships seem to be taken up primarily by students from the larger campus in Melbourne but I wanted to ensure regional applicants were considered. Two of the regional students were from Shepparton and one from Bendigo, and for some of them it was their first time in Asia.

 

Where do NCP students go and how is it organised?

Once students have been accepted into the NCP program we provide workshops to upskill them in software use and the soft skills we know employers highly value. We also do some acculturation, providing them with information on living and working in Malaysia.

The placement details are arranged by a third party placement provider in conjunction with La Trobe staff. When students arrive in Kuala Lumpur, they are welcomed by Global Student, the third party placement agency. Global Student arranges the student’s placement and accommodation but also organises cultural and tourist activities. Several students went to the Australian High Commission for an event but there are also informal things like visits to Penang or a daytrip into the city. It’s a whole cultural and educational package and generally the scholarship funding ($3,000) covers most of these costs.

Global Student places students in a range of places, some go to the Big 4, like KPMG, while others experience working in smaller firms.

 

NCP students’ orientation in KL

 

What are the kind of tasks NCP students do?

The subject LBS students are enrolled in is the Accounting Workplace Program (ACC3AWP) which is a fairly standard Work Integrated Learning (WIL) subject. Out of the 23 students enrolled in the Accounting Workplace Program last summer 8 were NCP students and the other 15 were students doing local placements. The subject runs exactly the same whether you are in Melbourne or in KL.

The Accounting Work Placement includes several assessment pieces. Students write a reflective report that looks back on their experience. They write and submit a short journal entry each week talking about what happened that week, what they learned and the tasks they did. This is also useful to me as the Subject Coordinator, I can see how the placement is progressing and offer support and mentoring if any issues arise along the way. At the end of the program they put those entries together in a report and it provides them with a document they can look back at and reflect on what they learned. Students also write a placement report focused on the accounting work they did; this could be either a pre-defined project with a deliverable outcome or an operational role. We have had students asked to check whether data was correct, another group wrote an audit report including recommendations following up on stock that was disappearing within a company. We even had one student who went to a smaller organisation, whose accounting system wasn’t very well set up, so she re-built their accounting system from scratch. It really depends on the placement needs and the skills of the student.

 

What were you doing in Kuala Lumpur?

It is important to make sure our students have an instructive and enjoyable experience, so I went over to KL to see how everybody was getting on. I checked-in with Global Student staff and met with all the students, we had dinner together and I spent time making sure everybody was progressing okay. It is a sort of pastoral care-check combined with a review of the academic rigour attached to the placements. We need to make sure our students are undertaking meaningful work and are being supported appropriately in all our work placement programs.

The NCP is a really good program, we have 10 places available next year, but experience some difficulty finding the right students to partake. As already said, many of our students have not travelled much and going on an adventure like this requires an element of trust. We prefer to select students who are confident in their ability to survive and thrive in a totally different environment as the NCP takes students well outside their comfort zone.

For students who do take this opportunity you can see the difference when they come back. Their confidence, their work-readiness, they know better now what they are studying for, it just opens their eyes. There is something very brave about going to Asia for 6 weeks. They come back and can say to themselves “It went well, I did that, I made that happen!”

 

 

Associate Professor Alison Parkes is a researcher, educator, consultant, and author whose expertise relates to optimising information quality and decision outcomes via better design and control of accounting systems and processes. In her professional career prior to entering academia she held positions at Queensland Rail, Rio Tinto, and PriceWaterhouseCoopers. Her academic career has included positions at Massey University New Zealand (Associate Lecturer) The University of Melbourne (Lecturer, Senior Lecturer) and Taylor’s University Malaysia (Associate Professor and MBA Program Director). Alison’s research consists of two primary themes; (1) The task-technology-individual fit implications of accounting systems design choices, and (2) Strategic investment decision-making. Her research has been published in journals including Decision Support Systems, Behaviour & IT, the Business Process Management Journal, and the Australian Journal of Information Systems. She authors a leading Australian accounting information systems textbook and also designs and delivers specialised executive education and consulting. Alison has consulted internationally to the Governments of Malaysia and Iraq, and completed a variety of management accounting consulting jobs in the Australian not for profit sector.

 

 

LBS Innovation Series: Think big or go home

This blog, as part of the LBS Innovation Series, brings you a presentation by Kate Burleigh, former Managing Director of Intel Australia/NZ and now country manager of Amazon Alexa Skills across Australia and New Zealand.

 

Kate’s topic is:

Think big or go home – why students and businesses with a global mindset are more likely to succeed within the digital era.

 

Platform economics & technologies

Kate addresses the rise of platform economics and how this enabling technology together with globalisation is driving the current wave of digital innovation and disruption. She outlines how the proliferation of connectivity and the growing power of data and data analytics is lowering costs through the use of platforms, cloud-based processing, storage and tools. Kate talks about the proliferation of platform economy since the advent of hot spots, Wi-Fi and cloud computing technologies used by companies like YouTube, Amazon, Uber, Airbnb, Facebook and Netflix.

What these firms and the next wave of Chinese technology firms such as Alibaba, Tencent, and WeChat have in common is that they think globally, have monopolistic tendency (i.e. they become the market standard), use artificial intelligence and are agile. For example, these companies have attached payment systems to their platforms which give them a competitive advantage.

In the below presentation we see how Kate challenges our current generation of educators, students, start-ups and business leaders to foster a global mindset and to better utilise and adopt platform technologies in order to be competitive and succeed more strongly.

 

Watch her presentation below:

 

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics in the La Trobe Business School. The series was developed after the successful National Innovation Forum organised by La Trobe Business School, NORTH Link and Deloitte Consulting P/L.

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:

Meet the Head of Department of Accounting and Data Analytics

Since January 2018, Alison Parkes has been the Head of Department of Accounting & Data Analytics. Business Newsroom sat down with Alison to ask her some questions about who she is, what made her come to La Trobe and other interesting facts about her.

 

Are you new to La Trobe?

I joined La Trobe in January 2017 and took up the HoD role after one year in the Department.

 

Where do you come from and what brought you to La Trobe University in 2017?

Before starting at La Trobe, I was with Taylor’s University in Malaysia for two years. I was recruited by them to build and accredit their MBA program. I specialised in postgraduate education during my time at Melbourne Uni which preceded my Malaysian appointment. While at Melbourne I had oversight of the Master of Business & IT throughout its entire life cycle from inception through to eventually teaching it out. When Taylor’s recruited me as their inaugural MBA Program Director I lived and worked two years in Malaysia, did lots of travel, built the MBA, got it accredited, and saw my first student cohort graduate just before I came back to Australia.

When I got towards the end of my two-year contract at Taylor’s in 2016 I had to decide whether I wanted to stay on for another two years or move back to Australia. I loved living in Malaysia but missed my family in Australia. I had already decided to come back when the job at La Trobe came up. I always wanted to work at La Trobe, so I applied for the job and was lucky enough to be appointed.

Before Taylor’s, I was at University of Melbourne for 15 years, I did my PhD there as a part-time PhD candidate and a full-time staff member. I graduated with my PhD in 2009. I’m a late career academic, a large part of my career was in industry. In my last industry role I was the most senior female IT executive in a state railway, working with huge financial systems projects and large numbers of staff. I got my first academic appointment at Massey University in New Zealand as a level A Lecturer in Information Systems. When I went into academia I had to start all the way from the bottom again, which was sort of a fun thing.

 

Why do you think La Trobe University is a good fit?

I have always been interested in the research projects and outputs from La Trobe as they are not always mainstream. I came from a more conservative academic environment with particular and relatively narrow views on what you were expected to publish and where to publish. I like what people are doing here, there is a lot more freedom and critical analysis, more work around sustainability, more private enterprise focus.

I have never been a traditional financial accountant. My background is accounting information systems. My first ever-academic job was not in an accounting department, but in an information systems department. While I was lecturing in IS I did my Honours year and a Masters Research which equipped me to enter the PhD program at Melbourne in Accounting & Business Information Systems. I’m a chartered accountant but have always been interested in the technical accounting systems side, which means my research isn’t necessarily published in mainstream accounting journals.

 

How will you be approaching your new role as Head of Department?

I’m fortunate that my expertise bridges both sides of accounting and data analytics, and I’m looking forward to bringing these disciplines closer together. We also need to refresh the accounting curriculum. Accounting doesn’t have to be boring, I know from my work experience that accounting is a really interesting and diverse field to work in. Across most universities, accounting is mostly treated the same old way, it’s as though we are still working with pen and paper.

I have always been passionate about educating students for the job they are actually going to be doing. To me that means educating them to be an accountant who uses accounting systems and data competently. This year I am rewriting the first year accounting information system subject to integrate Xero software and give students an idea of how it looks when you’re working with an accounting system in the workplace.

So my overall goal is to bring the two related disciplines closer together and refresh the curriculum so it better reflects the authentic lived experience of what accounting actually is. I’m not necessarily talking about changing the topics, but instead focusing on the pedagogy, how it’s being taught and assessed.

 

What do you know now that you wished you knew when you were a student at university?

I have an atypical student experience. I left high school early and came to University for my bachelor’s degree on a special admission program for mature students. I completed my Bachelors, Honours, Masters and PhD all as a part-time student while working full time. My advice to former me would be to maybe consider doing the PhD full-time instead of part-time. Working full-time as a Level B lecturer meant there were whole semesters where I got pretty much nothing done on the thesis. It’s good to look at your research through fresh eyes, but it’s also hard having to re-engage with your topic afresh over and over again.

 

What do you do to get rid of stress?

I never work on the weekend. Everyone has different tactics but that is the rule that I find works for me to balance out my life. I don’t mind being in the office for long hours during the week if it’s necessary but weekends are mine. I like to come back in on Monday feeling re-energised and ready to tackle the week ahead.

 

Lastly, if people come across you at the coffee-machine, what’s a good conversation starter?

Travel! I’m a big traveller. I love all parts of Asia and have travelled there extensively, also lots of US, UK & Europe. Since coming back to Australia I’m making time to visit places that I hadn’t been to before. I’m almost ashamed to admit that I recently went to the Great Ocean Road for the first time after living in Melbourne for 15 years. I’m always coming back from somewhere or about to go somewhere.

 

Associate Professor Alison Parkes is a researcher, educator, consultant, and author whose expertise relates to optimising information quality and decision outcomes via better design and control of accounting systems and processes. In her professional career prior to entering academia she held positions at Queensland Rail, Rio Tinto, and PriceWaterhouseCoopers. Her academic career has included positions at Massey University New Zealand (Associate Lecturer) The University of Melbourne (Lecturer, Senior Lecturer) and Taylor’s University Malaysia (Associate Professor and MBA Program Director). Alison’s research consists of two primary themes; (1) The task-technology-individual fit implications of accounting systems design choices, and (2) Strategic investment decision-making. Her research has been published in journals including Decision Support Systems, Behaviour & IT, the Business Process Management Journal, and the Australian Journal of Information Systems. She authors a leading Australian accounting information systems textbook and also designs and delivers specialised executive education and consulting. Alison has consulted internationally to the Governments of Malaysia and Iraq, and completed a variety of management accounting consulting jobs in the Australian not for profit sector.

Older posts

© 2018 Business Newsroom

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑