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La Trobe Business School

Month: October 2019

The CR3+ Conference is coming up!

The CR3+ Conference, hosted by La Trobe Business School, is just two weeks away. Where is this conference about? Why is this conference so important? What are some of the highlights?

What is CR3+?

Initially, Audencia Business School (France), Hanken School of Economics (Finland) and ISAE FGV (Brazil) decided to cooperate in their implementation of the United Nations’ Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME). This collaboration resulted in the joint organisation of an international conference on Corporate Responsibility, named CR3. When La Trobe Business School became a signatory of PRME, they joined CR3 and so CR3 became CR3+1. The aim of these four PRME champions is to exchange ideas, pedagogical processes, curriculum and research in the area of corporate responsibility.

2019 CR3+ Conference

On the 24th and 25th of October, LBS is hosting the seventh CR3+ Conference. The theme of the conference is Using dialogue to build partnerships for sustainability.

CR3+ logo - Using dialogue to build partnerships for sustainability

As we work towards building a more sustainable world we cannot work in isolation. Partnerships are necessary to ensure long term success. However, the partnership model may be problematic, with issues arising such as co-option and abuse of power. Differences between actors can also lengthen the journey and make the measure of success difficult to determine. Hence, this conference explores how partnerships can bring about sustainable solutions as we work together on progressing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

LBS has arranged a fantastic line-up of keynote speakers, panel discussants and other presenters.

Keynotes

Professor Dennis McDermott, La Trobe University Pro Vice-Chancellor (Indigenous), will be giving an academic keynote on partnerships, with a focus on the role of indigenous values in framing our understanding and implementation of partherships.

Jillian Reid, Principal in the Responsible Investment Team at Mercer, will talk about investing in a time of climate change, the growth in sustainability themed opportunities, and the role of the sustainable development goals in investment decision-making. 

Dr Leeora Black, Principal Risk Advisory at Deloitte Australia, is an expert on the Modern Slavery Act, and she will be speaking about new and different kinds of partnerships that are being driven by the Act.

Workshops

The workshop Exploring challenges and priorities of embedding SDGs in business schools using Lego SeriousPlay© is an interactive, action-based workshop facilitated by Heather Stewart and Rob Hales from Griffith Business School. This collaborative style of working on individual and group levels is proven to extend ideas, views and often break down assumptions in a safe and non-judgemental environment. The aim of the workshop is to develop new skills in resilience, creativity and lateral thinking in order to employ and establish sustainability within business schools.

Prof. Nava Subramaniam from RMIT and Dr. Raghu Raman from Amrita University are facilitating the workshop Amrita Live-In-Labs, which introduces Live-in-Labs® – a multidisciplinary experiential learning program that breaks down classroom and lab barriers by applying learned theory in real-world settings. This credit-based academic program draws on principles of lean research for the development and deployment of sustainable solutions for current challenges faced by rural communities in India. By directly living in rural communities (labs) and co-designing solutions to development challenges, program participants gain first-hand knowledge and know-how of identifying and assessing community needs and subsequently developing and implementing viable solutions through various participatory methods.

#CR3LTU

LBS will be using #CR3LTU on Twitter to keep you updated on speakers, presentations and other great conference moments. Join in and share your views and best moments of the conference too!

Our Partners

La Trobe Business School recognises and appreciates the support of its PRME partners and Mercer and Lifeskills in the delivery of this exciting event.  

We’re looking forward to welcome you to the conference!

1Inspirational Guide for the Implementation of PRME: Placing Sustainability at the heart of management education (2017). Edited by Principles for Responsible Management Education. New York: Routledge.  

Starting a Business Later in Life: Mature Entrepreneurs Conference

La Trobe Business School’s Professor of Entrepreneurship Alex Maritz recently delivered a keynote address at the Mature Entrepreneurs Conference organised by Sarina Russo Entrepreneurs. The Conference was part of Entrepreneurship Facilitators, an Australian Government initiative targeting nascent start-up entrepreneurs.

Sarina Russo Entrepreneurs

Sarina Russo Entrepreneurs provides individuals in the Ballarat, Moorabool, Golden Plains, Central Goldfields, Hepburn and Pyrenees regions of Victoria with free and practical support to encourage them to start a business as a way to create their own job. They provide services and advice such as mentoring, education on business industries, help to take a business idea to the next level and setting realistic goals and time frames (business.gov.au).

Mature Entrepreneurs Conference

Mature entrepreneurs represent the fastest growing sector of entrepreneurship in Australia. There are many reasons and many advantages to starting a business later in life. Mature age Australians face unique issues and opportunities in today’s labor market and self-employment is becoming a more attractive and viable option for older people wishing to be their own boss. 

The conference was specifically designed for people aged over 50 and explored the theme of entrepreneurship and self-employment as an alternative pathway or option to employment. The keynote address delivered by Alex was titled “Entrepreneur Start-Up Myths Exposed – the Rise of Mature Entrepreneurs in Australia”.

Alex giving his Keynote at the Mature Entrepreneurs Conference
Alex giving his Keynote

Close to 100 delegates, ranging from government officials, mentors and nascent entrepreneurs, heard about the significance of senior entrepreneurship. In his keynote address, Alex identified senior entrepreneurship as the fastest growing sector of entrepreneurship. There is a 9.3% participation rate (3% above that of developed nations), 34% of all entrepreneurs are senior entrepreneurs, and this sector contributes approx. $11.9bn to the Australian economy. Alex also talked about the benefits, which include behavioural, economic and psychological impacts. Adults over 50 are more likely to be self-employed than younger adults are more efficient and successful than their younger counterparts.

For further information on this thought provoking presentation, plus inspirational stories from guest speakers and entrepreneurs, visit http://www.matureentrepreneurs.com.au.

Media appearances by Alex on this topic

Only yesterday, Alex was interviewed on ABC National Radio by Myf Warhurst about why seniorpreneurs are the new force in the digital age. Click the link to listen back the interview: Why seniorpreneurs are the new force in the digital age

Alex was also recently interviewed by The Herald Sun. Click the link to read the article:  How seniorpreneurs are shaking up the start-up sector

What is it like to teach at one of LTU’s partnership universities?

Last year, La Trobe Business School and the Singapore Institute of Management (SIM) launched their partnership that includes Top Up programs for the Bachelor of Business (Tourism and Hospitality) and Bachelor of Business (Event Management) in Singapore. Students with an accredited diploma or advanced diploma are given 12 subjects advanced standing, which requires a further 12 subjects to Top Up their qualification to a degree awarded by La Trobe University.

Recently, several LBS teaching staff went to Singapore to deliver a variety of subjects as part of the program. LBS Newsroom caught up with some of them and asked them about their experience.

Jess Derham

Principles of Gastronomy (THS2GSY) and Food & Beverage Supervision (THS1FBS)

Both subjects I taught are practical subjects providing lots of interactive activities. Some of the highlights of the subjects included students designing their own menu’s through to showcasing destinations around the world in a live exhibition. We were also fortunate enough to have a very unique dining experience at Nox Dine In the Dark – a multi-sensory experience where you dine in complete darkness and are served by people who have a vision impairment.

My students were nothing short of amazing! Personally, the experience of teaching overseas allowed me to step out of my comfort zone and test my teaching skills to an international audience. Right from the preparation stage, to navigating a new university in another country, through to forming a bond with my students. It stands to be one of the most rewarding opportunities I have been provided with.

Jess and her class of students at SIM - an LTU partnership university
Jess and her class of students

Greg Dingle

Event Project (THS3SCE) and Volunteer Management (MGT3SVM)

Teaching at SIM was a great experience! It was challenging to teach two subjects that I had never taught before and both in the same week, but it was a very rewarding experience and I highly recommend it to other colleagues in LBS. I was also very fortunate to be part of a teaching team. Teaching is a collegial endeavour and my colleagues were fun to be with as well as to work with. The “Dine in the Dark” experience was also a really unique experience (thanks to Jess for making this possible).

The students were engaged and enthusiastic and I really enjoyed the week with them. They had a sense of humour too which I liked. I Singaporean-“ised” their content as much as possible (e.g. case studies, organisations, assessment examples, etc.) and I think they appreciated that. Walking in the Botanic Gardens at dawn on some mornings before work was also something I really loved. It’s a fantastic space and gave me some insights into how Singaporeans go about their daily lives. I was invited to join a Zumba class at the Gardens one morning, so it really is full of surprises…

Greg and his class of students at SIM - an LTU partnership university
Greg and his class of students

Paul Strickland

Computer Reservation Systems (THS2TCR) and Tourism & Hospitality Simulation (THS3THS)

In the subject Computer Reservation Systems, we teach students the Opera Hotel Property Management System. Being in computer labs, students have a difference experience to lectures and blended learning environments because the labs are designed for students to be self-taught with the tutor just facilitating the functionality of the software.

Teaching in Singapore is very rewarding. Students are very disciplined especially students that have completed national service. They also were very enthusiastic about the reservation system and managed well to work both autonomously and in teams in HOTS. I also really liked all the different types of food the students brought to class and had me try.

Some of Paul's students in the computer lab at SIM - an LTU partnership university
Some of Paul’s students in the computer lab

Anne Brouwer

Sustainability (BUS2SBY) and Social Media and Relationship Marketing (MKT3SRM)

In 2018 I was at the Dalian Jiaotong University in China for two weeks to deliver an LBS subject and absolutely loved the experience, so I didn’t have to think twice when I was asked to teach at the Singapore Institute of Management. It was a very intense week. I was new to both subjects, had to teach 6 hours a day and there is obviously a lot of preparation and administration work involved. But it was so worth it!

Even though the students were not used to the interactive way of teaching that we do at LTU (blended learning) they seemed to really enjoy it and got really excited over their in-class group work. There is just something about teaching in a different country, with a different culture and a different language. Ultimately, I think I learn as much from them, as they do from me.

Anne and her class of students at SIM - an LTU partnership university
Anne and her class of students
Read more about our SIM partnership: 
LBS’ new partnership with the Singapore Institute of Management

SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 15

SDG 15 - Life on Land

Preserving diverse forms of life on land requires targeted efforts to protect, restore and promote the conservation and sustainable use of terrestrial and other ecosystems. Sustainable development goal fifteen (SDG 15) focuses specifically on managing forests sustainably, halting and reversing land and natural habitat degradation, successfully combating desertification and stopping biodiversity loss (UN Statistics Report, 2019).

The facts

Forests cover 30% of the earth’s surface and are home to more than 80% of all terrestrial species of animals, plants and insects. Forests provide vital habitats for millions of species, and important sources for clean air and water, as well as being crucial for combating climate change. Also humans depend on forests for their livelihoods – an approximate 1.6 billion people (UNDP, 2019).

Furthermore, the United Nations Development Programme (2019) lists that:

  • Mountain regions provide 60-80% of the earth’s fresh water
  • Plant life provides 80% of the human diet
  • Humans rely on agriculture as an important economic resource, with 2.6 billion people depending directly on agriculture for a living.
  • The value of ecosystems to human livelihoods and well-being is US$125 trillion per year.
  • Nature-based climate solutions can contribute about a third of CO2 reductions by 2030.

Australia’s progress on SDG 15

“The main pressures affecting the Australian environment today are the same as in 2011, climate change, land-use change, habitat fragmentation and degradation and invasive species.”

State of the Environment Report (2016)

In Australia’s Voluntary National Review into the implementation of the SDGs, the government recognises the links between biodiversity, economic activity, and health and wellbeing.  This requires a multiple-stakeholder approach to addressing SDG 15, including businesses, environmental non-government organisations, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, community groups and individuals. In other words, everyone has an interest in maintaining the health and productivity of the land, but particularly those who derive their income and employment from it or have a cultural connection. However, the most recent State of the Environment Report (2016) found that Australia’s biodiversity is under increased threat and has, overall, continued to decline. More than 1,700 species and ecological communities are known to be threatened and at risk of extinction.

In terms of deforestation, some complexity exists in measuring overall forest area owing both to definitions and technical improvements in methods. Nonetheless, the consensus is that forest area is in decline and this trend is expected to continue in the absence of regulatory change. By one international measure, Australia now ranks among the top nations for deforestation (Transforming Australia Report, 2018). Notwithstanding the deterioration in biodiversity and increased deforestation, there are a number of initiatives under way that aim to address these, including The National Landcare Program, The Australian Business and Biodiversity Initiative, The Responsible Wood Certification Scheme, Digital Earth Australia and legislation including the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

Agribusiness at La Trobe

The agricultural sector is one of Victoria’s biggest export earners and has been identified as one of the most promising sectors for Australia’s regional economy. Hence, there is strong demand for industry professionals who have skills in areas such as agribusiness and rural banking, export business and government agencies.

La Trobe Business School launched the Bachelor of Business (Agribusiness) in 2017 and is taught at all Regional Victorian La Trobe University campuses including Bendigo, Shepparton, Albury-Wodonga and Mildura. During the degree, students do not only develop skills in financing, marketing and managing agricultural businesses, but also, in line with SDG 15, focuses on creating responsible, engaged and innovative graduates equipped to help farmers improve their food production sustainably and reduce the impact on declining resources (learn more about the degree here).

SDG Video

The video on SDG 15 is produced by our CR3+ Partner Audencia Business School from Nantes, France.  In the video, Dr Céline Louche discusses the sustainable development goal in depth, explains what terrestrial ecosystems are and what the role of businesses is regarding SDG 15. In the second part of the video, Céline interviews Rémi-Pierre Lapprend – CSR Manager at Maisons du Monde a French furniture and home decor company. The company sees SDG 15 as a framework that provides objectives and a vision regarding sustainable sourcing of wood – the most important natural resource the company uses. Through certification such as Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and Programme for the Endorsement of Forest (PECF), traceability programs set with Non-governmental organisations (NGO’s) and working with experts on deforestation and biodiversity for the Maisons du Monde Foundation, the company ensures that wood that is used does not contribute to deforestation.

Please enjoy the presentation.

If you would like access to the full video to use in your teaching, please contact Dr Swati Nagpal.

This blog is part of the SDG Series, a series that focuses on the 17 Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations, in the lead up to the CR3+ Conference in October 2019.

More blogs in the SDG Series:
- An introduction to the Sustainable Development Goals
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 1
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 2
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 3
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 4
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 5
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 6
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 7
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 8
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 9
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 10
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 11
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 12
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 13
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 14

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