Business Newsroom

La Trobe Business School

Month: October 2019

MBA students contribute to economic development in Melbourne’s North

With more than eight years professional experience and at least three years in a management position, MBA students use their knowledge and expertise gained through business education to work as management consultants for La Trobe University’s Industry Partners and their affiliated organisations, particularly in Melbourne’s North.

Experiential Learning Project

The subject that facilitates students to work as management consultants is called Experiential Learning Project (BUA5ELP). Students enrolled in 2019 have contributed to the economic development in Melbourne’s North by:

  • Creating a new model for recruiting and training vocational education and training (VET) teachers for the Northern College of Arts and technology (NCAT).
  • Recommending strategies to improve young women’s access to investment opportunities for the Women’s Investment Network Forum (WIN).
  • Developing a growth strategy for the Carlton Respects program.
  • Presenting a comparative analysis and strategy options for Melbourne Innovation Centre.
  • Creating new job opportunities for people with intellectual disabilities to work in the digital economy.

The Experiential Learning Project was a crucial experience in my MBA journey. It gave me the opportunity to practically experience the inner workings of a SME and help the organisation resolve an identified business blockage. The consulting project helped me practically utilize my learnings from the MBA into a real business scenario. The ELP was an incredible learning opportunity that helped me get industry ready post the MBA.

Mahima Chaudhary (International MBA Advanced Student)

MBA Study Tour with NORTH Link

NORTH Link is a regional partnership of industry, education and government and one of Victoria’s key economic development organisations. As part of its interest in food security and reinventing the industrial focus of Melbourne’s northern suburbs, NORTH Link is facilitating new export markets for agricultural products and food manufacturing.

Supported by the La Trobe International and prestigious Chongqing University, this study tour invited MBA students to accompany the NORTH Link delegation on this important business venture to China.

Six MBA students learnt first-hand how businesses in Melbourne’s North are working together to develop new commercial opportunities for the region. Students expanded their knowledge of international trade in the Chinese market and built professional networks.

The MBA Study Tour with NORTH Link provided an opportunity for me to experience China and international trade like no other. Incredibly grateful to have been part of the delegation, receiving in-depth learning of culture, business interactions and opportunities within Chongqing and Chengdu. The friendships and networks made were invaluable and enhanced my MBA experience exponentially. 

Alana Pendrick (OnLine La Trobe MBA student)
The NORTH Link and La Trobe MBA Delegation at Chongqing University
The NORTH Link and La Trobe MBA Delegation at Chongqing University

What happens when an MBA student combines an Experiential Learning Project with an International Study Tour?

Bhrigu worked on a growth strategy and business plan for Juanita’s Kitchen, a food manufacturing business in Coburg. Then he seized the opportunity to take Juanita’s hot sauces and spices to the Sichuan province of China on an MBA-NORTH Link Business Study Tour.

Study Tour 2019 – China proved to be one of the best experience I have had during my MBA journey so far. It was one in the lifetime opportunity for me which helped me gain deep insights about China’s culture, history, city planning, local businesses and foreign trade by being a part of a prestige delegation from Melbourne’s North which included NORTH Link and prominent government officials. Moreover, it opened pathways for networking and helped me in making some precious business networks and friends. I would like to thank the MBA Director, Dr Geraldine Kennett for providing MBA students with this wonderful opportunity which significantly and undoubtedly added value to our degree.

Bhrigu Dutt Sharma (MBA Student)

LBS plays important role in LTU’s Net Zero target

In August, La Trobe University announced that it will become Victoria’s first zero-emissions University. The $75 million initiative combining 20 separate projects will ensure that LTU will have Net Zero emissions by 2029.

Net-zero carbon emissions, or carbon-neutral emissions, are achieved by balancing the amount of carbon released with an equal amount of carbon offset by producing clean energy.

The La Trobe Energy Analytics Platform (LEAP) provides the technology pillar for the Net Zero initiative and is designed and implemented by researchers and students from LBS’ Centre for Data Analytics and Cognition (CDAC). The team will design and implement the platform which then monitors energy consumption in up to 50 smart buildings and makes lighting, heating and cooling adjustments in real time to reduce energy consumption.

Smart Building
source: https://pxhere.com/en/photo/1452109

The creation of a smart building allows the building to ‘think’ for itself in optimising its energy consumption. Formulating this Smart Building involves Artificial Intelligence, Unsupervised Machine Learning, Data Analytics and Software Development; this includes CDAC’s own brand of algorithms that have been developed over the past decade. CDAC’s research work is internationally renown and has also been used successfully in several industrial engagements ranging from Health, Transport, Fire and Emergency Services, Sport and Energy. The Centre also hosts a unique blend of research and expertise in its staff and researchers which makes it the ideal candidate to develop such a platform and espouses the concept of a Living Lab that La Trobe University champions.

LEAP Technical Architect (and LBS PhD candidate) Nishan Mills summarised the system as:

Buildings and spaces display distinctive behaviours in energy consumption. The LEAP platform will use available data streams to create digital twins for buildings and spaces in the University environment in order to capture this behavioural profile. This allows the platform to detect, analyse and suggest corrective measures to achieve the most efficient energy consumption across the university.

Read more about LTU’s Net Zero projects here

Going to Vietnam as part of your LBS degree

Another successful Vietnam Study Tour has taken place during the 2019 Winter Semester. Students explored and experienced Ho Chi Minh City, Hoi An, Hue, Hanoi and Halong Bay.

The subject

The study tour is an optional elective and part of the subject Tourism and Hospitality International Study Program (THS3ISP). The objective of the study tour is to examine and observe the cultural, social and environmental aspects as a tourist, the impacts of government policy and the legacy of war.

The assessment tasks include:

  • Case study relating to war and ethics
  • Daily reflective journal of personal experiences
  • Report evaluating the differences between the hotel and restaurant standards of Australia and Vietnam
  • Group presentation based on photo journal on a given topic

The students

This year, nineteen students went on the Vietnam Study Tour, 13 females and 6 males, of which four international students. The students were accompanied by Paul Strickland, lecturer at LBS and program director – Tourism, Hospitality and Event Management, and Lisa Murphy from the LBS admin team.

The study tour

The study tour started with a tour through Ho Chi Minh City where students visited the Central Post Office and Opera House, both colonial-era architectural masterpieces, followed by the Reunification Palace, so-called for the building’s integral part in the reunification of the country after the war.  Students also visited the Cu Chi Tunnels, who not only served as living questers during the Vietnam War but also as supply routes and hospitals for thousands guerrilla fighters. The trip was combined with a visit to the War Remnants Museum for a firsthand look at the Vietnam War through the eyes of Vietnamese people.

The Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City organised a lecture about Vietnamese culture, food, religion and the differences in study techniques. The Vietnamese students organised interactive games, hosted morning tea and gave a vocal performance followed by a cooking demonstration at Mandarin Restaurant. Before traveling to Hoi An, there was time to visit the site of Australia’s Nui Dat Task Force base, Nui Dat SAS Hill, the Long Tan Cross at the War Memorial, Australian War Graves, Long Tan battlefield and Vung Tau city – the arrival port for Australian troops. This may be the last time students gets to see the Nui Dat SAS Hill in its current form as it has started to be quarried.

Lecture at Vietnam National University
Lecture at Vietnam National University

In Hoi An, a former trading port, is famous for its restored architecture, homemade silk, expert tailors and delicious noodles and seafood. Here the students visited Chua Ong Pagoda, built in 1653 in honour of the Chinese general Quan Cong who is worshiped as a symbol of loyalty and justice. Students also visited Phuc Kien Assembly Hall to see a temple dedicated to the goddess of the sea, the 200 years old Tan Ky house and took a boat trip along Thu Bon river to the Red Bridge Cooking School for a five-course cooking lesson. While in Hoi An, students also visited My Son, the former capital of the ancient Cham civilisation who ruled Vietnam from the 2nd until the 13th century and attended not-for-profit charity restaurants.

Red Bridge Cooking School in Hoi An
Red Bridge Cooking School in Hoi An

From Hoi An, the students travelled to Hue – the Imperial City of the former Emperor. They enjoyed a tour of the city and boat trip on the Perfume River to the Thien Mu Pagoda. After visiting Hue the tour continued to Hanoi, Vietnam’s capital city. Students visited the Temple of Literature, built in homage to the Chinese scholar Confucius, Hoa Lo prison and the Old Quarter’s 36 streets.

Towards the end of their two-week study trip, students went on a boat cruise through UNESCO World Heritage Halong Bay. The cruise included a visit to the Tien Ong Cave, which covers an area of 1000 m2, a cooking demonstration, squid fishing and a visit to Cua Van floating fishing village.  The study tour ended when students returned to Hanoi with a visit to the Ho Chi Minh Complex where they heard about the man who led Vietnam’s campaign for independence from French colonial rule.

Kayaking at Halong Bay
Kayaking at Halong Bay

Student feedback

We asked two students for feedback about the trip and both had an amazing time.

I absolutely loved everything about this trip! The culture, the food, the consequences of war and the diverse tourism products and services available.

My daily reflection and photo journal will be a treasured memory for years to come. I knew no-one in the beginning and made lots of friends. I would definitely recommend this study tour to anyone.

I learnt so much during this once in a lifetime experience!

The study tour was extremely interactive. Everything we did, one of us [a student] was involved in everything, if not all of us. I loved seeing the diverse countryside, the cities, the jungle, the fields and of course the beach and water.

SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 17

SDG 17: Partnerships for the goals

The sustainable development goals can only be realized with strong global partnerships and cooperation. The final sustainable development goal in our SDG Series is about just that: “Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development” (SDG compass, 2015).

The focus of SDG 17

SDG 17 seeks to strengthen global partnerships to support and achieve the ambitious targets of the 2030 Agenda, bringing together national governments, the international community, civil society, the private sector and other actors (SDG Knowledge Platform, 2019). SDG 17 reflects a holistic approach to the means of implementation for the 2030 Agenda, including 19 targets that span finance, technology, capacity-building, trade and systemic issues. In addition, the means of implementation are integrated across the other Goals through dedicated targets, underlining their cross-cutting nature (UN High Level Political Forum on the SDGs, 2018).

Partnerships and PRME Week at La Trobe Business School

As we work towards building a more sustainable world we cannot work in isolation. Partnerships are necessary to ensure long term success. However, the partnership model may be problematic, with issues arising such as co-option and abuse of power. Differences between actors can also lengthen the journey and make the measure of success difficult to determine. Hence, LBS has drawn on its various networks to turn the spotlight on partnerships and SDG 17 over a week of UN PRME-related activities this month.

CR3+ Conference 24-25 October

CR3+ is a collaborative initiative of four PRME champions: Audencia Business School (France), Hanken School of Economics (Finland) and ISAE Brazilian Business School (Brazil) and La Trobe Business School (Australia). These champions have been working together since 2008, with the aim to exchange ideas, pedagogical processes, curriculum and research in the area of corporative responsibility.

Working in conjunction with PRME champions, The La Trobe Business School is hosting a two-day conference on the topic ‘Using dialogue to build partnerships for sustainability’ from the 24th to 25th October 2019. The conference explores how partnerships can bring about sustainable solutions as we work together on progressing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

Australia/New Zealand PRME Chapter Meeting – 26 October

The day after the conference, fifteen regional PRME Chapters are coming together to help advance the Six Principles (i.e. purpose, values, method, research, partnership and dialogue [link]) within a particular geographic context, rooting PRME in different national, regional, cultural, and linguistic landscapes. They function as platforms for localized engagement from higher education institutions, and in cooperation with Global Compact Local Networks, and can develop projects and initiatives that support the Sustainable Development Goals regionally (UN PRME, 2019).

The theme of this year’s chapter meeting is ‘Students as Partners’. In addition to representatives from Australian and New Zealand business schools, 11 students will be attending the meeting this year. These students are having input into the program for the day and will be actively involved in the discussions on the day.

4th PRME Champions Meeting for the 2018/2019 Cycle

After meeting with the regional PRME Chapters, there is a PRME Champions Meeting. The PRME Champions group is made up of 40 business schools from all continents, with the aim of developing a blueprint for embedding the PRME principles and Sustainable Development Goals across three key areas – research, teaching and partnerships. The meeting in Melbourne is the culmination of the 2-year PRME Champions Cycle, with a focus on partnerships for sustainable development.  Once completed in 2020, the blueprint will then be shared across the 750+ PRME business schools across the world.

A key output from the meeting will be the development of the partnership element of the blueprint, highlighting best practice, the role of multiple voices (Indigenous approaches to partnerships is a key sub-theme of the meeting) and some of the challenges facing multi-sector partnerships.

SDG Videos

Because the last SDG is about partnerships, there is not one, but there are three videos from different CR3+ partners. In each video, Associate Professor Martin Fougere from Hanken School of Economics introduces particular SDG 17 targets and the CR3+ partner(s) that illustrate how their university is working on these targets.

The targets that are being discussed in the videos are:

  • 17.6 – Knowledge sharing and cooperation for access to science, technology and innovation
  • 17.9 – Enhance SDG capacity in developing countries
  • 17.16 – Enhance the global partnership for sustainable development
  • 17.17 – Encourage effective partnerships

The first video shows Patricia Guérin from Audencia Business School. Patricia discusses how the university’s partnership with the non-governmental organisation (NGO) Planète Urgence and particularly its “solidarity leave” volunteering scheme works towards targets 17.9 and 17.17.

The second video looks into targets 17.16 and 17.17 and shows representatives from both La Trobe Business School and Hanken School of Economics. Professor Suzanne Young and Dr Swati Nagpal discuss LBS workshops that are being organised for capacity building in connection with different SDGs. Associate Professor Pia Polsa from Hanken School of Economics talks about the CORE project the university is part of. The project is funded by Strategic Research Council at the Academy of Finland, and studies and develops collaborative action in environmental planning and decision-making.

The third video shows Professor Cleverson Andreoli from ISAE Brazilian Business School and focuses on targets 17.6 and 17.7. Cleverson talks about the National Institute of Science and technology for Sustainable Sewage Treatment Plants (INCT), a cooperative network that focuses on issues related to sanitation in Brasil, and the research that ISAE and other Brazilian universities conduct in this area.

If you would like access to the full videos to use in your teaching, please contact Dr Swati Nagpal.

This blog is part of the SDG Series, a series that focuses on the 17 Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations, in the lead up to the CR3+ Conference in October 2019.

More blogs in the SDG Series:

- An introduction to the Sustainable Development Goals
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 1
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 2
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 3
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 4
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 5
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 6
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 7
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 8
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 9
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 10
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 11
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 12
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 13
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 14
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 15
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 16

Visiting Manchester, Liverpool and London during LBS’ Sport Study Tour

During the winter semester, several students went on a sport study tour to the United Kingdom as part of their Sport Management degree. Read about the tour and students’ amazing experience.

The tour reinvigorated my belief on why I chose to study sport and what direction I want to take for the future.

Hamza Nur

The subject

The Sport Study Tour (BUS3SST) is a winter elective subject that provides third-year Bachelor of Business (Sport Management) students the opportunity to extend their formal academic learning beyond the local classroom into the global sport environment.

The tour brings students for two weeks to the UK. While overseas, students are based at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU), a partner of La Trobe University, whose industry partners include Manchester City FC, Manchester City Council and UK Sport. 

Participating in this study tour allowed for students to understand the multicultural and sporting City of Manchester and enhance their understanding of different cultural contexts, values and practices, as part of the process of becoming and global citizen. Assessments included:

  • Case study on the UK sport system (Individual)
  • Daily reflective journal and photos (Individual)
  • Group presentation on sport development program (pairs)

The students

Ten students (8 males and 2 females) attended the study tour and were accompanied by Dr Pam Kappelides from LBS and Emily Harbrow from LTU Sport. Emily is an LBS Sport Management alumna and worked at Manchester City FC meaning that besides the many contacts she has in the UK, students heard first-hand about her journey in sport.

The students partaking in the study tour

The study tour

Upon arrival, students enjoyed a walking tour of Manchester, were officially welcomed by the Pro Vice Chancellor (Research) and after an introduction to the subject had their first lecture on UK Sports Volunteer Management by Catherine Elliott, senior lecturer of Sport Management & Marketing at MMU. Other (guest) lectures organised for the students included:

  • Lecture on UK Sport Policy and Sport Mega Events by Professor Jonathan Grix and Paul Brannagan from MMU
  • Guest lecture by Colin Bridgford, CEO at Manchester Football Association
  • Guest lecture by Neil Fairlamb from the Manchester City Council on Strategic Lead – Parks, Leisure & Events
  • Lecture on E-Sports by Dr Qi Peng from MMU
  • Guest lecture by Matt Stocks from Greater Sport UK

Obviously, the tour included a variety of interesting and sport focused field trips, such as:

  • National Football Museum
  • Manchester Institute of Health and Performance
  • Old Trafford Cricket Ground
  • Manchester Velodrome
  • Manchester City Elite
  • Manchester City Football Club
Students at Old Trafford Cricket Ground

Besides Manchester, students also visited Liverpool and London. In Liverpool students enjoyed a Beatles and City Walking Tour before attending the Netball World Cup watching Australia play England. In London students attended Wimbledon followed by a tour through Wembley Stadium. While in London, students also had the opportunity to talk with another LBS Sport Management alumni over dinner – Gareth Ficarra – who is currently working at Arsenal Football Club.

The two-week trip finished with students’ group presentations and the presentation of fun awards for each student on their participation during the tour.

Student feedback

We asked the students for some feedback about the trip, and they all agreed that it was a trip of a life-time!

The study tour was a fantastic opportunity to immerse ourselves in international sporting organisations and continue to grow our networks at an international level.

Haylee Jesensek

The study tour was an opportunity of a lifetime! The tour provided the chance to grow internationally and created great networking opportunities as well as a great learning experience. The tour gave us the opportunity to hear and connect with Sport CEOs and La Trobe Alumni.

Max Hannah

The UK study tour provided all students with incredible exposure to some of the most influential sporting organisations in the world, as well as unparalleled networking opportunities with highly regarded sports professionals throughout England.

Will Holding

The trip was amazing, I was able to fulfill a life dream. It was really interesting to see the difference between Australian and UK sporting culture, through the stadium tours and presentations. Before going on the trip, I was quite unclear of what I wanted in my future. Although this may still be the case, I know 100% that my future belongs in sport after this amazing experience.

Hayden Atherton

The UK sports study tour was a once in a life time experience. To be able to see the leading international sporting clubs and their facilities was unbelievable. The opportunity to establish international sporting connections gave me an insight into opportunities beyond Australia. Being able to experience the atmosphere at world class sporting events is something I will treasure forever.

Jacqui Lawson

SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 16

SDG 16 - Piece, justice and strong institutions

We cannot hope for sustainable development without peace, stability, human rights and effective governance, based on the rule of law. Yet, our world is increasingly divided. Some regions enjoy peace, security and prosperity, while others fall into seemingly endless cycles of conflict and violence. This is not inevitable and must be addressed (UNDP, 2019).

The facts

While homicide and trafficking cases have seen significant progress over the past decade, there are still thousands of people at greater risk of intentional murder within Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa and around Asia. Children’s rights violations through aggression and sexual violence continue to plague many countries around the world, especially as under-reporting and lack of data aggravate the problem.

Some more facts by the United Nations Development Programme regarding SDG 16 (UNDP, 2019):

  • By the end of 2017, 68.5 million people had been forcibly displaced as a result of persecution, conflict, violence or human rights violations.
  • There are at least 10 million stateless people who have been denied nationality and its related rights.
  • Corruption, bribery, theft and tax evasion cost developing countries US$1.26 trillion per year.
  • 49 countries lack laws protecting women from domestic violence.
  • In 46 countries, women now hold more than 30 percent of seats in at least one chamber of national parliament.
  • 1 billion people are legally ‘invisible’ because they cannot prove who they are. This includes an estimated 625 million children under 14 whose births were never registered. 

The focus of SDG 16

Sustainable development goal sixteen (SDG 16) aims to promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. There are ten targets set for this goal, including: reducing all forms of violence and related death rate; ending abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence against and torture of children; ensuring equal access to justice for all; providing legal identity for all, including birth registration; reducing corruption and bribery in all their forms and developing effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels.

Ultimately, to tackle the challenges listed earlier in the article, and to build more peaceful, inclusive societies, there needs to be more efficient and transparent regulations put in place and comprehensive, realistic government budgets. One of the first steps towards protecting individual rights is the implementation of worldwide birth registration and the creation of more independent national human rights institutions around the world (UN SDGs, 2019).

SDG 16 Progress in Australia

Australia is a relatively peaceful country, ranking 15 out of 163 in the Global Peace Index. Australia also ranks highly in the Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index at 13 out of 176 (although our score has dropped since 2012). Australia was a strong advocate for the inclusion of a separate goal on governance and law and justice throughout negotiations of the 2030 Agenda. SDG 16 lies at the heart of Australian values and commitment to political, economic and religious freedoms; liberal democracy; the rule of law; and good governance, transparency and accountability (Voluntary National Review on the SDGs, 2018).

That said, there remain a range of areas for improvement in this space, including for example Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander rights, domestic violence, and bribery and corruption (UNGCNA, 2018).  Violence, while declining, is still a major issue in Australia, following distinct gender and age-based trends. While from 2012 to 2016 the proportion of people experiencing violence declined (with men reporting a steeper decline), the proportion of men and women experiencing sexual violence/harassment increased to almost 18% of females and less than 10% of men (Transforming Australia, 2018).

Further, Australia’s prison population is at its highest recorded level, with indigenous people representing over 28% of the prison population and the female prison population increasing by 77% over the last decade. Household crime statistics indicate that the highest levels of incarceration are in Western Australia and the Northern Territory, suggesting that rising numbers may be linked to social exclusion, limited access to justice and rehabilitation (Transforming Australia, 2018).

Tackling safety and Gender-based violence at La Trobe

Student safety is a key priority for the La Trobe Business School, especially considering the findings of the 2017 report by the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) into the nature, prevalence and reporting of sexual assault and sexual harassment at Australian universities. The Universities Australia ‘Respect Now Always’ initiative has become a focus of the whole of university culture at La Trobe University, and we have acted swiftly on the recommendations from the report implementing a significant number of measures including the Speak- Up and Respect at La Trobe programs to enable a whole of organisation culture change to halt behaviour towards students that includes intimidation, harassment, discrimination, bullying and all forms of violence (LBS PRME Report, 2018).

The university also established the La Trobe Violence Against Women research Network (LAVAWN). The aim of LAVAWN is conducting research that creates a world where everyone can live free from violence.  Members of the network include researchers and higher degree students across the university from different schools and disciplines including Law, Sociology, Rural Health, Public Health, Planning, Sexual Health, Social Work.

SDG Video

The video below is created by our CR3+ partner Hanken School of Economics (Finland). In the video, Associate Professor Martin Fougere discusses the targets set for SDG 16. He particularly focuses on targets:

  • 16.4 – Combat organised crime and illicit financial and arms flows
  • 16.5 – Substantially reduce corruption and bribery
  • 16.6 – Develop effective accountable and transparent institutions

Martin talks about corruption and the Financial Secrecy Index and why we need to reframe the question of “why is your country corrupt?” to “what are the drivers and enablers of corruption?” to address the issue of corruption. He also discusses the problem of tax avoidance, particularly the problem of multinational tax avoidance and the need for greater accountability and transparency, not just in the public sector but also the private sector and civil society organisations.

The second part of the video shows an interview with Lyydia Kilpi. Lyydia is policy advisor for tax justice and corporate accountability at KEPA – the Finnish Service Centre for Development Cooperation. KEPA is the umbrella organisation for Finnish civil society organisations (CSOs) who work with development cooperation or are otherwise interested in global affairs. Lyydia talks about the importance of tax and tax avoidance issues in relation to piece, justice and strong institutions. She also discusses how tax issues can be addressed through SDG 16 and its targets, and what the benefits would be of an institutionalised tax country-by-country corporate reporting.

Please enjoy the presentation.

If you would like access to the full video to use in your teaching, please contact Dr Swati Nagpal.

This blog is part of the SDG Series, a series that focuses on the 17 Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations, in the lead up to the CR3+ Conference in October 2019.


More blogs in the SDG Series:
- An introduction to the Sustainable Development Goals
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 1
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 2
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 3
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 4
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 5
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 6
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 7
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 8
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 9
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 10
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 11
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 12
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 13
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 14
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 15

The CR3+ Conference is coming up!

The CR3+ Conference, hosted by La Trobe Business School, is just two weeks away. Where is this conference about? Why is this conference so important? What are some of the highlights?

What is CR3+?

Initially, Audencia Business School (France), Hanken School of Economics (Finland) and ISAE FGV (Brazil) decided to cooperate in their implementation of the United Nations’ Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME). This collaboration resulted in the joint organisation of an international conference on Corporate Responsibility, named CR3. When La Trobe Business School became a signatory of PRME, they joined CR3 and so CR3 became CR3+1. The aim of these four PRME champions is to exchange ideas, pedagogical processes, curriculum and research in the area of corporate responsibility.

2019 CR3+ Conference

On the 24th and 25th of October, LBS is hosting the seventh CR3+ Conference. The theme of the conference is Using dialogue to build partnerships for sustainability.

CR3+ logo - Using dialogue to build partnerships for sustainability

As we work towards building a more sustainable world we cannot work in isolation. Partnerships are necessary to ensure long term success. However, the partnership model may be problematic, with issues arising such as co-option and abuse of power. Differences between actors can also lengthen the journey and make the measure of success difficult to determine. Hence, this conference explores how partnerships can bring about sustainable solutions as we work together on progressing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

LBS has arranged a fantastic line-up of keynote speakers, panel discussants and other presenters.

Keynotes

Professor Dennis McDermott, La Trobe University Pro Vice-Chancellor (Indigenous), will be giving an academic keynote on partnerships, with a focus on the role of indigenous values in framing our understanding and implementation of partherships.

Jillian Reid, Principal in the Responsible Investment Team at Mercer, will talk about investing in a time of climate change, the growth in sustainability themed opportunities, and the role of the sustainable development goals in investment decision-making. 

Dr Leeora Black, Principal Risk Advisory at Deloitte Australia, is an expert on the Modern Slavery Act, and she will be speaking about new and different kinds of partnerships that are being driven by the Act.

Workshops

The workshop Exploring challenges and priorities of embedding SDGs in business schools using Lego SeriousPlay© is an interactive, action-based workshop facilitated by Heather Stewart and Rob Hales from Griffith Business School. This collaborative style of working on individual and group levels is proven to extend ideas, views and often break down assumptions in a safe and non-judgemental environment. The aim of the workshop is to develop new skills in resilience, creativity and lateral thinking in order to employ and establish sustainability within business schools.

Prof. Nava Subramaniam from RMIT and Dr. Raghu Raman from Amrita University are facilitating the workshop Amrita Live-In-Labs, which introduces Live-in-Labs® – a multidisciplinary experiential learning program that breaks down classroom and lab barriers by applying learned theory in real-world settings. This credit-based academic program draws on principles of lean research for the development and deployment of sustainable solutions for current challenges faced by rural communities in India. By directly living in rural communities (labs) and co-designing solutions to development challenges, program participants gain first-hand knowledge and know-how of identifying and assessing community needs and subsequently developing and implementing viable solutions through various participatory methods.

#CR3LTU

LBS will be using #CR3LTU on Twitter to keep you updated on speakers, presentations and other great conference moments. Join in and share your views and best moments of the conference too!

Our Partners

La Trobe Business School recognises and appreciates the support of its PRME partners and Mercer and Lifeskills in the delivery of this exciting event.  

We’re looking forward to welcome you to the conference!

1Inspirational Guide for the Implementation of PRME: Placing Sustainability at the heart of management education (2017). Edited by Principles for Responsible Management Education. New York: Routledge.  

Starting a Business Later in Life: Mature Entrepreneurs Conference

La Trobe Business School’s Professor of Entrepreneurship Alex Maritz recently delivered a keynote address at the Mature Entrepreneurs Conference organised by Sarina Russo Entrepreneurs. The Conference was part of Entrepreneurship Facilitators, an Australian Government initiative targeting nascent start-up entrepreneurs.

Sarina Russo Entrepreneurs

Sarina Russo Entrepreneurs provides individuals in the Ballarat, Moorabool, Golden Plains, Central Goldfields, Hepburn and Pyrenees regions of Victoria with free and practical support to encourage them to start a business as a way to create their own job. They provide services and advice such as mentoring, education on business industries, help to take a business idea to the next level and setting realistic goals and time frames (business.gov.au).

Mature Entrepreneurs Conference

Mature entrepreneurs represent the fastest growing sector of entrepreneurship in Australia. There are many reasons and many advantages to starting a business later in life. Mature age Australians face unique issues and opportunities in today’s labor market and self-employment is becoming a more attractive and viable option for older people wishing to be their own boss. 

The conference was specifically designed for people aged over 50 and explored the theme of entrepreneurship and self-employment as an alternative pathway or option to employment. The keynote address delivered by Alex was titled “Entrepreneur Start-Up Myths Exposed – the Rise of Mature Entrepreneurs in Australia”.

Alex giving his Keynote at the Mature Entrepreneurs Conference
Alex giving his Keynote

Close to 100 delegates, ranging from government officials, mentors and nascent entrepreneurs, heard about the significance of senior entrepreneurship. In his keynote address, Alex identified senior entrepreneurship as the fastest growing sector of entrepreneurship. There is a 9.3% participation rate (3% above that of developed nations), 34% of all entrepreneurs are senior entrepreneurs, and this sector contributes approx. $11.9bn to the Australian economy. Alex also talked about the benefits, which include behavioural, economic and psychological impacts. Adults over 50 are more likely to be self-employed than younger adults are more efficient and successful than their younger counterparts.

For further information on this thought provoking presentation, plus inspirational stories from guest speakers and entrepreneurs, visit http://www.matureentrepreneurs.com.au.

Media appearances by Alex on this topic

Only yesterday, Alex was interviewed on ABC National Radio by Myf Warhurst about why seniorpreneurs are the new force in the digital age. Click the link to listen back the interview: Why seniorpreneurs are the new force in the digital age

Alex was also recently interviewed by The Herald Sun. Click the link to read the article:  How seniorpreneurs are shaking up the start-up sector

What is it like to teach at one of LTU’s partnership universities?

Last year, La Trobe Business School and the Singapore Institute of Management (SIM) launched their partnership that includes Top Up programs for the Bachelor of Business (Tourism and Hospitality) and Bachelor of Business (Event Management) in Singapore. Students with an accredited diploma or advanced diploma are given 12 subjects advanced standing, which requires a further 12 subjects to Top Up their qualification to a degree awarded by La Trobe University.

Recently, several LBS teaching staff went to Singapore to deliver a variety of subjects as part of the program. LBS Newsroom caught up with some of them and asked them about their experience.

Jess Derham

Principles of Gastronomy (THS2GSY) and Food & Beverage Supervision (THS1FBS)

Both subjects I taught are practical subjects providing lots of interactive activities. Some of the highlights of the subjects included students designing their own menu’s through to showcasing destinations around the world in a live exhibition. We were also fortunate enough to have a very unique dining experience at Nox Dine In the Dark – a multi-sensory experience where you dine in complete darkness and are served by people who have a vision impairment.

My students were nothing short of amazing! Personally, the experience of teaching overseas allowed me to step out of my comfort zone and test my teaching skills to an international audience. Right from the preparation stage, to navigating a new university in another country, through to forming a bond with my students. It stands to be one of the most rewarding opportunities I have been provided with.

Jess and her class of students at SIM - an LTU partnership university
Jess and her class of students

Greg Dingle

Event Project (THS3SCE) and Volunteer Management (MGT3SVM)

Teaching at SIM was a great experience! It was challenging to teach two subjects that I had never taught before and both in the same week, but it was a very rewarding experience and I highly recommend it to other colleagues in LBS. I was also very fortunate to be part of a teaching team. Teaching is a collegial endeavour and my colleagues were fun to be with as well as to work with. The “Dine in the Dark” experience was also a really unique experience (thanks to Jess for making this possible).

The students were engaged and enthusiastic and I really enjoyed the week with them. They had a sense of humour too which I liked. I Singaporean-“ised” their content as much as possible (e.g. case studies, organisations, assessment examples, etc.) and I think they appreciated that. Walking in the Botanic Gardens at dawn on some mornings before work was also something I really loved. It’s a fantastic space and gave me some insights into how Singaporeans go about their daily lives. I was invited to join a Zumba class at the Gardens one morning, so it really is full of surprises…

Greg and his class of students at SIM - an LTU partnership university
Greg and his class of students

Paul Strickland

Computer Reservation Systems (THS2TCR) and Tourism & Hospitality Simulation (THS3THS)

In the subject Computer Reservation Systems, we teach students the Opera Hotel Property Management System. Being in computer labs, students have a difference experience to lectures and blended learning environments because the labs are designed for students to be self-taught with the tutor just facilitating the functionality of the software.

Teaching in Singapore is very rewarding. Students are very disciplined especially students that have completed national service. They also were very enthusiastic about the reservation system and managed well to work both autonomously and in teams in HOTS. I also really liked all the different types of food the students brought to class and had me try.

Some of Paul's students in the computer lab at SIM - an LTU partnership university
Some of Paul’s students in the computer lab

Anne Brouwer

Sustainability (BUS2SBY) and Social Media and Relationship Marketing (MKT3SRM)

In 2018 I was at the Dalian Jiaotong University in China for two weeks to deliver an LBS subject and absolutely loved the experience, so I didn’t have to think twice when I was asked to teach at the Singapore Institute of Management. It was a very intense week. I was new to both subjects, had to teach 6 hours a day and there is obviously a lot of preparation and administration work involved. But it was so worth it!

Even though the students were not used to the interactive way of teaching that we do at LTU (blended learning) they seemed to really enjoy it and got really excited over their in-class group work. There is just something about teaching in a different country, with a different culture and a different language. Ultimately, I think I learn as much from them, as they do from me.

Anne and her class of students at SIM - an LTU partnership university
Anne and her class of students
Read more about our SIM partnership: 
LBS’ new partnership with the Singapore Institute of Management

SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 15

SDG 15 - Life on Land

Preserving diverse forms of life on land requires targeted efforts to protect, restore and promote the conservation and sustainable use of terrestrial and other ecosystems. Sustainable development goal fifteen (SDG 15) focuses specifically on managing forests sustainably, halting and reversing land and natural habitat degradation, successfully combating desertification and stopping biodiversity loss (UN Statistics Report, 2019).

The facts

Forests cover 30% of the earth’s surface and are home to more than 80% of all terrestrial species of animals, plants and insects. Forests provide vital habitats for millions of species, and important sources for clean air and water, as well as being crucial for combating climate change. Also humans depend on forests for their livelihoods – an approximate 1.6 billion people (UNDP, 2019).

Furthermore, the United Nations Development Programme (2019) lists that:

  • Mountain regions provide 60-80% of the earth’s fresh water
  • Plant life provides 80% of the human diet
  • Humans rely on agriculture as an important economic resource, with 2.6 billion people depending directly on agriculture for a living.
  • The value of ecosystems to human livelihoods and well-being is US$125 trillion per year.
  • Nature-based climate solutions can contribute about a third of CO2 reductions by 2030.

Australia’s progress on SDG 15

“The main pressures affecting the Australian environment today are the same as in 2011, climate change, land-use change, habitat fragmentation and degradation and invasive species.”

State of the Environment Report (2016)

In Australia’s Voluntary National Review into the implementation of the SDGs, the government recognises the links between biodiversity, economic activity, and health and wellbeing.  This requires a multiple-stakeholder approach to addressing SDG 15, including businesses, environmental non-government organisations, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, community groups and individuals. In other words, everyone has an interest in maintaining the health and productivity of the land, but particularly those who derive their income and employment from it or have a cultural connection. However, the most recent State of the Environment Report (2016) found that Australia’s biodiversity is under increased threat and has, overall, continued to decline. More than 1,700 species and ecological communities are known to be threatened and at risk of extinction.

In terms of deforestation, some complexity exists in measuring overall forest area owing both to definitions and technical improvements in methods. Nonetheless, the consensus is that forest area is in decline and this trend is expected to continue in the absence of regulatory change. By one international measure, Australia now ranks among the top nations for deforestation (Transforming Australia Report, 2018). Notwithstanding the deterioration in biodiversity and increased deforestation, there are a number of initiatives under way that aim to address these, including The National Landcare Program, The Australian Business and Biodiversity Initiative, The Responsible Wood Certification Scheme, Digital Earth Australia and legislation including the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

Agribusiness at La Trobe

The agricultural sector is one of Victoria’s biggest export earners and has been identified as one of the most promising sectors for Australia’s regional economy. Hence, there is strong demand for industry professionals who have skills in areas such as agribusiness and rural banking, export business and government agencies.

La Trobe Business School launched the Bachelor of Business (Agribusiness) in 2017 and is taught at all Regional Victorian La Trobe University campuses including Bendigo, Shepparton, Albury-Wodonga and Mildura. During the degree, students do not only develop skills in financing, marketing and managing agricultural businesses, but also, in line with SDG 15, focuses on creating responsible, engaged and innovative graduates equipped to help farmers improve their food production sustainably and reduce the impact on declining resources (learn more about the degree here).

SDG Video

The video on SDG 15 is produced by our CR3+ Partner Audencia Business School from Nantes, France.  In the video, Dr Céline Louche discusses the sustainable development goal in depth, explains what terrestrial ecosystems are and what the role of businesses is regarding SDG 15. In the second part of the video, Céline interviews Rémi-Pierre Lapprend – CSR Manager at Maisons du Monde a French furniture and home decor company. The company sees SDG 15 as a framework that provides objectives and a vision regarding sustainable sourcing of wood – the most important natural resource the company uses. Through certification such as Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and Programme for the Endorsement of Forest (PECF), traceability programs set with Non-governmental organisations (NGO’s) and working with experts on deforestation and biodiversity for the Maisons du Monde Foundation, the company ensures that wood that is used does not contribute to deforestation.

Please enjoy the presentation.

If you would like access to the full video to use in your teaching, please contact Dr Swati Nagpal.

This blog is part of the SDG Series, a series that focuses on the 17 Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations, in the lead up to the CR3+ Conference in October 2019.

More blogs in the SDG Series:
- An introduction to the Sustainable Development Goals
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 1
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 2
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 3
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 4
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 5
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 6
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 7
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 8
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 9
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 10
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 11
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 12
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 13
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 14

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