Business Newsroom

La Trobe Business School

Month: July 2019

LBS Innovation Series: Is big data the answer for the future of agribusiness?

Scott McKenzie, Chief Executive Officer at SensaData, used the company’s Smart-r-Tag as a case study to explain the digitisation of supply chains and the effect of the IoT on Australia’s food and agribusiness.

About Scott

Scott’s background is in open innovation, design and commercialisation, engineering and project management. He previously led technology development initiatives in diverse fields to deliver the scaling and risk reduction for the transfer of technologies from the laboratory to industry, coordinating research providers and industry groups including multinational OEs.

The Smart-r-Tags

With industry vendors, commentators and researchers advocating IoT adoption across the agriculture and food production sector, it is worth looking to approach implementations in stages with clear objectives and referring to practices, challenges, and outcomes in other domains. Scott explores implementation through the Smart-r-Tag. These tags can be attached to a carton, crate or pallet and will show the product’s location, temperature, surrounding air-quality and handling throughout its transit from supplier to wholesaler, distributor and retailer. Data generated by the system is transferred to cloud systems for generation of knowledge and insights through analytics, and presentation to end users and clients for alerts and reporting.

Please enjoy Scott´s presentation.

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School. 
 
More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:
- LBS Innovation Series: Gaps to perfection
- LBS Innovation Series: Building a global business in a period of disruption
- LBS Innovation Series: Is the Australian agriculture sector ready to grow?
- LBS Innovation Series: Agtech – Agriculture’s Disrupter or Saviour?
- LBS Innovation Series: Crossing the Chasm – Agtech & innovation ecosystems
- LBS Innovation Series: Innovation and the Agribusiness Taskforce
- LBS Innovation Series: Supply challenges and consumer expectations
- LBS Innovation Series: Robotics and AI are coming your way
- LBS Innovation Series: Consumer trends and future foods
-LBS Innovation Series: The future of agricultural production systems
- LBS Innovation Series: Cities that feed our planet

LBS is AACSB accredited – What does that mean?

AACSB accredited

What is AACSB?

AACSB International – The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) is a global nonprofit association and the world’s largest business education alliance that connects educators, students, and business. Its vision is to transform business education for global prosperity and create the next generation of great leaders.

AACSB International was founded in 1916 in the US, initially named the Association of Collegiate Schools of Business (ACSB), and currently provides quality assurance, business education intelligence, and professional development services to over 1,500 member organisations and more than 785 accredited business schools worldwide (AACSB, 2019).

AACSB International’s mission is to foster engagement, accelerate innovation, and amplify impact in business education. This mission is aligned with the AACSB accreditation standards for business schools. AACSB strives to continuously improve engagement among business, faculty, institutions, and students, so that business education is aligned with business practice (AACSB Business Standards).

The accreditation process

The AACSB accreditation evaluation is extremely rigorous. There are fifteen standards, built around the three themes of engagement, innovation, and impact, organised into four categories:

  1. Strategic management and innovation: This category includes a clear articulated and distinctive mission; producing high-quality intellectual contributions that impact the theory, practice, and teaching of business and management; and financial strategies to provide resources appropriate to, and sufficient for, achieving its mission and action items.
  2. Participants (students, faculty, and professional staff): This category includes policies and procedures for student admissions, academic progression and supporting career development. In addition, well-documented and well-communicated processes to manage and support faculty members over the progression of their careers and deploys sufficient professional staff to ensure quality outcomes.
  3. Learning and teaching: This category includes well-documented, systematic processes for determining and revising degree program learning goals; designing, delivering, and improving degree program curricula to achieve learning goals. In addition, curriculum content is appropriate to general expectations for the degree program type and learning goals, and the degree program structure and design are appropriate to the level of the degree program and ensure achievement of high-quality learning outcomes.
  4. Academic and professional engagement: This category includes curricula that facilitates student academic and professional engagement appropriate to the degree program type and learning goals, executive education that complements teaching and learning in degree programs and intellectual contributions and lastly, strategically deploying faculty who collectively and individually demonstrate significant academic and professional engagement that sustains the intellectual capital necessary to support high-quality outcomes consistent with the school’s mission and strategies.

Once a school receives the AACSB accreditation, it must undergo re-evaluation every five years.

The world’s highest standard of excellence

AACSB-accredited schools have been proven to provide the best in business education worldwide and are recognised worldwide by top employers and other universities (Best Business Schools, 2019).

“We’re proud that our commitment to excellence has been recognised through accreditation by AACSB International – the highest standard of achievement for business schools worldwide. Only 5% of business schools in the world have earned AACSB accreditation and being recognised as the highest standard of excellence in business education confirms LBS’ place among the world’s leading business schools.

For students this accreditation means they can be confident LBS has the resources, credentials and commitment to prepare them to succeed in a diverse range of fields including accounting, finance, business and commerce. And it reflects our dedication to providing a progressive education that sets students up for career success.”

Professor Jane Hamilton, Dean and Head of La Trobe Business School
AACSB member


SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 10

SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities

The 2030 Agenda calls for a “just, equitable, tolerant, open and socially inclusive world in which the needs of the most vulnerable are met” (SDG Knowledge Platform, 2016). This call comes at a time when, despite important gains made since 2000 in lifting people out of poverty, inequalities and large disparities remain in income and wealth, and in access to food, healthcare, education, land, clean water and other assets and resources essential for living a full and dignified life.  

The facts

Economic inequality is largely driven by the unequal ownership of capital. Since 1980, very large transfers of public to private wealth occurred in nearly all countries. The global wealth share of the top 1 percent was 33 percent in 2016. In addition, in 1980 the top 1 percent had 16 percent of global income, while the bottom 50 percent had 8 percent of income. In 2016, 22 percent of global income was received by the top 1 percent compared with 10 percent of income for the bottom 50 percent.

There is also inequality between the different genders. Women spend, on average, twice as much time on unpaid housework as men. Also, women have as much access to financial services as men in just 60 percent of the countries assessed and to land ownership in just 42 percent of the countries assessed (UNDP, 2019).

The focus of SDG 10

Some groups including those in rural areas (e.g. family farmers), women, young people, people with disabilities, indigenous peoples and others have persistently clustered at the bottom of distributions. Real wage growth has constantly declined since 2015 and at the same time, a warming climate, demographic change, decent work deficits, political crises, technological change and conflict risk exacerbating inequalities if actions are not taken toward equality in both opportunities and outcomes. Such inequalities can become self-perpetuating across generations, thus hindering progress towards one of the central objectives of the 2030 Agenda – that of ‘leaving no one behind’. Understanding that development is not sustainable if people are excluded from opportunities, services, and the chance for a better life; sustainable development goal ten (SDG 10) calls on the international community to “reduce inequality within and among countries”.

The 10 targets within SDG 10 cast a wide net to capture multiple drivers of inequality and to ensure that no group or individual is left behind. Four targets address within country inequality across social, economic and political dimensions aiming to expand prosperity, inclusion, and social protection. Three targets aim to reduce inequality among countries with attention to cross-border flows of finance and people and the distribution of voice in global institutions. Three other targets focus on the means of implementation and put forward concrete steps for attaining greater equality by directing resource flows toward those most in need (World Bank, 2019).

SDG 10 progress in Australia

In Australia, the period from 2000 to 2015 was characterised by strong economic growth that led to a substantial rise in average incomes. However, income increases did not lead to a reduction in income and wealth inequalities, with the Gini index – a common measure of inequality – remaining reasonably constant over this period. Using the Gini index, wealth inequality (0.6) is shown to be significantly higher than income inequality (0.3). Australia remains more unequal than most developed countries, limiting opportunities for many and undermining sustainable development.

Social exclusion fell prior to the global financial crisis, but has since increased. Unemployment benefits have fallen to be more than 20% below the poverty line. The gender pay gap has barely reduced in 20 years, and large gender inequalities remain at home, in the workplace and in society.

Since 2000, real disposable income per capita has grown by 29%, but there has been no increase over the last five years. As wages growth has slowed, many families struggle with rising energy and housing costs. There has been growth in employment and some fall in unemployment, but this has been offset partly by higher underemployment. Many Australians would like to work and earn more. For those workers with low skill levels, the opportunities to retrain throughout their working lives are limited, and home ownership is increasingly elusive for young people (Transforming Australia Report, 2018).

How is this relevant to business?

Addressing inequality makes good business sense because it increases economic participation and helps build markets and prosperity. Long term viability is only possible when the world is thriving, but the world cannot fully prosper when large population groups lack reasonable paths to success.  Diversity of background and experience within an organisation stimulates innovation and fresh thinking. It creates a more attractive work environment that in turn helps to attract and retain talent. Diversity can be thought of as a multi-faceted competitive advantage (GCNA Australia, 2018).

Equality and diversity are strategic business issues. It has been well demonstrated that businesses that embrace workplace diversity and inclusion are more innovative and outperform in organisational effectiveness and profitability. Corporate social responsibility is becoming a critical factor to a growing number of global investors and the capital markets.

Extract from joint letter from Australian business leaders in support of marriage equality to Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull (2017)

SDG Video

The video on SDG 10 is created by our CR3+ partner ISAE Brazilian Business School (ISAE). The video shows Rithyane Cardozo discussing SDG 10 and interviewing Marcia Ponce from the Caritas Institute and the work they do in Curitiba, Brazil. Caritas is an international organisation that fights issues of inequality. The interview is about how Caritas works towards SDG 10 by looking at economic inequality but also inequality because of environmental issues, and inequality for immigrants and refugees.

Please enjoy the presentation.

If you would like access to the full video to use in your teaching, please contact Dr Swati Nagpal.

This blog is part of the SDG Series, a series that focuses on the 17 Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations, in the lead up to the CR3+ Conference in October 2019. 

More blogs in the SDG Series:
- An introduction to the Sustainable Development Goals
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 1
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 2
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 3
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 4
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 5
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 6
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 7
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 8
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 9

LBS recognises outstanding youth in local business

For a number of years, LBS has been sponsoring the Young Business Achiever Awards as part of the Northern Business Achievement Awards (NBAAs).

The Young Business Achiever Awards identify businesses and leaders in their fields that have made a major contribution to the economy, community and development of employment skills for the next generation in Melbourne’s northern region.

What are the NBAAs?

The NBAAs occur through a partnership of industry, education, local and state government and decision makers across Melbourne’s north, including the local government areas of Banyule, Darebin, Hume, Moreland, Nillumbik and Whittlesea. The awards recognise the business achievements of small and medium-sized enterprises and encourage business excellence, growth and competitiveness. The NBAAs are managed by NORTH Link, a regional partnership of industry, education and government, and partner of La Trobe University

Young Business Achievers Awards

LBS sponsorship of the Young Business Achiever Awards is part of our ongoing commitment to the local community, and local youth in particular. The Awards recognise the achievements of young people (25 years or under) working in local businesses who display an outstanding attitude, endeavour and contribution to their company and fellow employees.

LBS sponsorship of the Young Business Achiever Awards aims to develop and strengthen the links between businesses, the local community and the School. The LBS mission is to improve the education standards of the business leaders of tomorrow, and to up-skill today’s business leaders to help them better navigate the challenges and opportunities associated with business disruption. So we are delighted to partner with NORTH Link in these awards that recognise local business excellence and innovation.

Professor Jane Hamilton (Dean and Head of the La Trobe Business School)

Recipients 2019

The awards are presented during the quarterly NBAA breakfasts, where recipients receive a certificate and small prize in recognition of their achievement. There have been two NBAA breakfasts in 2019 with four Young Business Achiever Awards recipients: Shima Rahmatizadeh, Ellie Dunstan, Ella Brothers and Sharnie Robinson. The awards were presented by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School.

Shima Rahmatizadeh received her award for establishing EngJunior. Shima has just completed a PhD in Engineering, with a focus on geographical information systems. Shima worked and studied mostly with men, and her dream has been to encourage more women into engineering and science. So she established her own initiative, EngJunior, which brings engineering and science into the classroom and aftercare, showing primary age children how much fun engineering can be. Shima introduces practical activities where children learn and apply the concepts of engineering. It’s enjoyable, educational and a great way to encourage more girls into the career that Shima is so passionate about.

Young Business Achiever Awards: Shima Rahmatizadeh
Shima Rahmatizadeh

Ellie Dunstan received the award for her company Dress Hire AU, founded in 2015. The company supplies Australian women with an affordable alternative to wearing a new outfit for each event. Dress Hire AU services women Australia wide via a delivery service and was one of the first Australian dress hire businesses to automate through a website and booking app. Shoppers can also visit the Eltham warehouse to try on and walk away with a valuable garment at a fraction of the price.

Young Business Achiever Awards: Ellie Dunstan
Ellie Dunstan

Ella Brothers received her award for her outstanding work as Dispatch Officer at Combo, a provider of business IT solutions. Ella has great quality customer service skills, with a focus on the professional technical services that Combo delivers and ensures that customers get the right tech on their doorstep at the right time.

Young Business Achiever Awards: Ella Brothers
Ella Brothers

Sharnie Robinson received her award for her longstanding contribution to Ferguson Plarre, a family owned and operated bakery business. Sharnie’s first job, at the age of 15, was with Ferguson Plarre and she worked her way up from washing dishes to managing the shop in Mernda during Year 12. From there she managed the shop for two years before she became a business partner and opened her own store. Within 18 months of opening, the store won an award for excellence in retail and Sharnie was nominated for the Telstra Small Businesswoman of the Year award.

Young Business Achiever Awards: Sharnie Robinson
Sharnie Robinson

LBS congratulates all these young business achievers on their awards!

LBS Innovation Series: Cities that feed our planet

Serena Lee and Geert Hendrix from Farmwall gave a presentation during the 2018 Innovation in Food and Agribusiness Forum (IFAF) showing how their aquaponic vertical garden is turning cities into food producing ecosystems that positively impact the environment and inspire others to do the same.

About Farmwall

Farmwall is an agrifood-tech start-up that designs urban farming technology and experiences to enhance fresh produce accessibility in the city. The company’s flagship product is the Farmwall – a small-scale indoor farm the size of a bookcase that grows and stores microgreens, herbs and leafy greens in a nicely designed natural ecosystem, eliminating packaging waste and food miles. Every Farmwall has a gut made of clay balls, which keeps all the good bacteria in balance and allows the food to grow naturally, without enclosing or sterilising it. There are fish at the bottom of the Farmwall, creating a colourless gas called ammonia. The good bacteria transform this gas into nitrates for the plants. Farmwall leases the infrastructure on an end-to-end service model, based on a monthly subscription.

The Farmwall (Photo by Goodsmiths)
The Farmwall (Photo by Goodsmiths)

Cities that feed our planet

The delivery of sustainability is shifting through the rise of the experience economy, the push for health and wellness within our urban landscape, and innovations in AgTech. In their presentation, Farmwall showcases how a combination of technology and customer service can bring meaningful experiences through food, with positive social and environmental outcomes. The mindset of staying agile and embracing a disruptive business model has brought the start-up one step closer to their vision of creating “cities that feed our planet”.

Please enjoy Farmwall´s presentation.

This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School. 
 
More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:
- LBS Innovation Series: Gaps to perfection
- LBS Innovation Series: Building a global business in a period of disruption
- LBS Innovation Series: Is the Australian agriculture sector ready to grow?
- LBS Innovation Series: Agtech – Agriculture’s Disrupter or Saviour?
- LBS Innovation Series: Crossing the Chasm – Agtech & innovation ecosystems
- LBS Innovation Series: Innovation and the Agribusiness Taskforce
- LBS Innovation Series: Supply challenges and consumer expectations
- LBS Innovation Series: Robotics and AI are coming your way
- LBS Innovation Series: Consumer trends and future foods
- LBS Innovation Series: The future of agricultural production systems

SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 9

Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

With over half the world population now living in cities, mass transport and renewable energy are becoming ever more important, as are the growth of new industries and information and communication technologies (SDG Fund, 2019).

The facts

Industrialisation drives economic growth, creates job opportunities and thereby reduces income poverty. Innovation advances the technological capabilities of industrial sectors and prompts the development of new skills.  Infrastructure provides the basic physical systems and structures essential to the operation of a society or enterprise. Sustained investment in infrastructure and innovation are crucial drivers of economic growth and development. However, basic infrastructure like roads, information and communication technologies, sanitation, electrical power and water remains scarce in many developing countries (SDG Knowledge Platform, 2019).

At the moment, 2.3 billion people still lack access to basic sanitation. In some low-income African countries, infrastructure constraints cut businesses’ productivity by around 40 percent. Moreover, 2.6 billion people in developing countries do not have access to constant electricity, and more than 4 billion people still do not have access to the Internet – of which 90 percent are in the developing world. There are opportunities too. The renewable energy sectors currently employ more than 2.3 million people, which could reach 20 million by 2030. Also, in developing countries, barely 30 percent of agricultural products undergo industrial processing, compared to 98 percent high-income countries, which suggests that there are great opportunities for developing countries in agribusiness (UNDP, 2019).

The focus of SDG 9

The focus of sustainable development goal (SDG) 9 is to build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation. These pillars all share the objective of achieving socially inclusive and environmentally sustainable economic development. Realizing SDG 9 by 2030 requires overcoming resource constraints, building and strengthening developing countries’ capacities, and exploring innovative ways to solve development challenges. SDG 9 has approximately 20 targets and indicators related to its three pillars and is closely linked to other SDGs related to job creation, sustainable livelihoods, improved health, technology and skills development, gender equality, food security, green technologies and climate change (SDG Knowledge Hub, 2019).

Implications for business

Ageing, degraded or non-existent infrastructure makes conducting good business challenging. Business relies on materials, resources, labour and service support from all corners of the world and the ability to access them efficiently is key to establishing new markets. Computing and technology-based skills are of significant value to most businesses today, and consumers of common goods and services live on every continent. However, basic infrastructure supporting technologies, communications, transportation, and sanitation that business relies on is not universally available, hindering economic growth and societal progress. Promoting sustainable industries, and investing in scientific research and innovation, are all important ways to facilitate sustainable development (SDG Fund, 2019).

Promoting innovation

More than 4 billion people still do not have access to the internet. Bridging this digital divide is crucial to ensure equal access to information and knowledge, and consequently foster innovation and entrepreneurship. This presents an opportunity for business. By committing to sustainable industrialization and promoting innovation across company operations, businesses can contribute to development efforts in the regions in which they operate through upgrading local infrastructure, investing in resilient energy and communications technologies, and making these technologies available to all people, including marginalized groups, who might not have access otherwise. Global companies can also promote inclusive infrastructure development by bringing valuable financial services and employment opportunities to smaller and/or minority-owned businesses (SDG Compass, 2019).

Delivering infrastructure

Leadership on SDG 9 represents a significant market opportunity for businesses in other ways too. For example, retrofits and installation of new infrastructure is a market worth $3.7 trillion annually. Delivering this infrastructure can allow businesses to access new markets for their products and services, as well as access to underserved labour markets and resources, while respecting international standards for environment and social impacts. The transition to a green, resilient industrial and infrastructure base globally represents a significant investment opportunity with large rewards for businesses that can position themselves at the leading edge of the sectors that must deliver it (SDG Blueprint for Business, 2017).

Interconnectedness to other SDGs

Action on SDG 9 is strongly interconnected with many other SDGs, most notably SDG 11 on sustainable cities and communities, and SDG 12 on responsible consumption and production. Efforts to create new opportunities for innovation and employment in developing countries directly relate to SDG 8. Infrastructure-dependent SDGs including those relating to food (SDG 2), water and sanitation (SDG 6), energy (SDG 7), and climate action (SDG 13) will also benefit from action on SDG 9. Leading action must be managed such that it does not risk exacerbating existing inequalities, or creating new ones, and so that it is not contributing to any form of corruption and violation of human rights that would negatively impact on a range of SDGs (SDG Blueprint for Business, 2017).

SDG Video

The video on SDG 9 is created by our CR3+ partner ISAE Brazilian Business School (ISAE). The video highlights two projects that are related to SDG 9. The first project is called Jardins de Mel, which involves placing bee boxes in areas such as parks, schools and community gardens. The project raises awareness about the environment, the contribution of insects to maintaining life, pollination and the importance of ecosystem services. The second project is a start-up from Curitiba in Brazil that used renewable energy technology to create a mini-plant that generates energy from water and then returns 100% of the water back to its source.

Please enjoy the presentation.

If you would like access to the full video to use in your teaching, please contact Dr Swati Nagpal.

This blog is part of the SDG Series, a series that focuses on the 17 Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations, in the lead up to the CR3+ Conference in October 2019. 

More blogs in the SDG Series:
- An introduction to the Sustainable Development Goals
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 1
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 2
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 3
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 4
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 5
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 6
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 7
- SDG Series: Sustainable Development Goal 8

LBS Rises through the Global Ranks

The first half of 2019 has not only seen LBS receiving its Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditation but also saw us soar in some of the most important global rankings.

According to Times Higher Education (known for their THE World University Rankings) there are at least 20,000 higher education institutions in the world. Being ranked by university or subject in the top 1000 means belonging to the top 5% in the world (THE, 2018).

ARWU

The Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) by ShanghaiRanking Consultancy is “the most widely used annual ranking of the world’s research universities” (The Economist cited in Downing & Ganotice Jr, 2017, p. 97).

Last week, ARWU ranked La Trobe Business School in the top 45 for Hospitality and Tourism Management (2019), in the top 400 for Business Administration (2019) and in the top 500 for Economics (2019) worldwide.

Hospitality and Tourism Management

LBS’ Bachelor of Business (Tourism and Hospitality) program has been developed over the last 15 years to meet the needs of graduate student employability, industry standards and university requirements.

Besides AACSB, the Hospitality and Tourism Management program is also accredited by the European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) through the prestigious EFMD Programme Accreditation System (EPAS). Moreover, it has three other qualifications embedded: Responsible Service of Alcohol (RSA), Responsible Service of Food (RSF, also known as Principles of Hygiene) and Galileo certification by Travelport – a leading industry-based travel agent group.

Business Newsroom asked Paul Strickland (Program Director – Tourism, Hospitality and Event Management) about the outstanding ARWU result for Hospitality and Tourism Management:

In the first year, students have a Work Integrated Learning (WIL) component in which they are trained and gain work experience at Mantra Bell City in Preston. This generally leads to employment in the hospitality sector immediately. Students then progress through second year and the 3rd year capstone subjects is Tourism and Hospitality Simulation where students form teams and simulate operating a hotel at senior management level.

The program also supports industry networking events, volunteering and career progression opportunities such as international study tours, exchanges and short programs. The New Colombo Plan funding has been a successful enhancement to assist students to achieve their goals and internationalise the program.

Also our research is embedded into the program. Numerous research books and texts have been developed by staff members and used in teaching globally. All these types of activities, working with industry and quality of research have contributed to our international rankings.

Paul Strickland (Program Director – Tourism, Hospitality and Event Management)

ARWU Methodology

In order to be ranked by ARWU, the university must have Nobel Laureates, Highly Cited Researchers or papers published in Nature or Science. Amount of papers indexed by Science Citation Index-Expanded (SCIE) and Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) are also included together with per capita academic performance. This leads to a total of 1200 universities of which the best 500 are being published.

Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) 2019 Hospitality & Tourism Management

QS World University Rankings

The QS World University Rankings, compiled by QS Quacquarelli Symonds, announced last week that La Trobe Business School’s Online MBA climbed 12 places to being number 32 in the world & number 3 in Australia in the QS Distance Online MBA Rankings (2019).

Dr Geraldine Kennett (La Trobe MBA Director) was interviewed by MBA News where she mentioned:

The strong improvement in the ranking over the last 12 months reflects an overhaul of the program and aligning more strongly to industry via its partners, including the Australian Ballet, National Gallery of Victoria, NORTH Link and the Melbourne Innovation Centre.

The MBA also underwent a comprehensive refresh recently and provides not only more relevant content, but also a range of options for delivery such as of face to face class options for online students so they have the opportunity to be part of the on-campus experience, meet colleagues and engage with lecturers.

Dr Geraldine Kennett (La Trobe MBA Director)

QS Methodology

Instead of focusing mainly on research outputs like ARWU, QS World University Rankings puts emphasis on a university’s reputation, from both an academic and employer perspective. They use six indicators: academic reputation, employer reputation, student-to-faculty ratio, citations per faculty, international faculty ratio and international student ratio (Downing & Ganotice Jr, 2017).

QS Online MBA Rankings 2019

Find out more information about our Bachelor of Business (Tourism & Hospitality) or La Trobe MBA.

References:
- Downing, K. & Ganotice Jr, F.A. (2017). World University Rankings and the Future of Higher Education. IGI Global. 
- MBA News (2019). Australian Online MBAs Score Global Top 50 Rankings in 2019. [link]

LBS Innovation Series: The future of agricultural production systems

At the 2018 Innovation in Food and Agribusiness Forum, Professor Tony Bacic, Director of the La Trobe Institute of Agriculture & Food, provided an overview of Australia’s agriculture sector, its research, production and institutional challenges, and global opportunities.

About Tony

Tony is internationally recognised as a leader in plant biotechnology. His research is focused on the structure, function and biosynthesis of plant cell walls and their biotechnological application as well as the application of functional genomics tools in biological systems.
From 1996 to 2017, Professor Bacic held a Personal Chair in the School of BioSciences at the University of Melbourne, was Leader of the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls team at the University of Melbourne (2011-2017), and also spent time as Deputy Director of that Centre, and Director of the Plant Cell Biology Research Centre at the School of BioSciences. Tony is a current Board Member of the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria. Tony is a James Cook University Outstanding Alumnus (2010) and a La Trobe University Distinguished Alumnus (2013).

La Trobe Institute of Agriculture & Food

Besides the future of agricultural production and science systems, Tony talks about the La Trobe Institute of Agriculture & Food (LIAF). The LIAF’s aim is to tackle the issues of growing enough food to meet future world demand and exploring the benefits of medicinal agriculture. This includes a focus on crop diversification and changing diets and research that considers the crop plant environment (e.g. Golden Soil), identifies innovative methods for improved production of specialty grains (e.g. Fit-for-Purpose Seeds) and develops enhanced nutritional quality and medicinal benefits (e.g. Quality Dietary Fibre and medical marijuana).

Please enjoy Tony’s presentation.



This blog is part of the LBS Innovation Series, developed by Dr Mark Cloney, Professor of Practice in Economics at La Trobe Business School. 

More blogs in the LBS Innovation Series:
- LBS Innovation Series: Gaps to perfection
- LBS Innovation Series: Building a global business in a period of disruption
- LBS Innovation Series: Is the Australian agriculture sector ready to grow?
- LBS Innovation Series: Agtech – Agriculture’s Disrupter or Saviour?
- LBS Innovation Series: Crossing the Chasm – Agtech & innovation ecosystems
- LBS Innovation Series: Innovation and the Agribusiness Taskforce
- LBS Innovation Series: Supply challenges and consumer expectations
- LBS Innovation Series: Robotics and AI are coming your way
- LBS Innovation Series: Consumer trends and future foods

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