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La Trobe Business School

Month: March 2017

LBS Associate Professor Vanessa Ratten publishes “Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Smart Cities”

Recently, LBS Associate Professor Vanessa Ratten published a new book titled “Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Smart Cities.”

The book aims to examine the role that innovation has in creating smart cities by focusing on issues such as public transport, use of energy efficiency and sustainability practices. It helps to shed understanding on how cities have become smarter in the way they handle increased migration to urban and rural areas and decrease the strain on public finances.

The work received several positive reviews from prestigious institutions:

‘There is a huge amount of confusion and hyperbole concerning the idea of a ‘smart city’ with the human element often entirely overlooked in favour of infrastructure and hardware models. Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Smart Cities takes a sweeping tour through an extensive range of literatures that help to clarify the processes and dynamics of social smart cities. Vanessa Ratten has authored a formidable compendium of material that provides a thorough overview of the way that current concepts of smartness are being applied in contemporary cities. The book is an essential starting point for any academic, practitioner or policy-maker who wants to better understand the role of humans in making smart social cities.’ — Dr Paul Benneworth, University of Twente, The Netherlands

‘Policy and business leaders have been debating the merits of smart cities. This pathbreaking book paves the way in understanding why smart cities are so important and strategies to create smart cities.’ — David B. Audretsch, Distinguished Professor, Indiana University

‘This book provides an excellent opportunity to discuss, from different perspectives, the development of cities, under the contemporaneous paradigm of smart cities.

There are a number of issues, associated to the debate over smart cities, such as innovation, economic development, social inclusion, and education, among others. Such dimensions are explored in the book, providing the opportunity to a deep exploration of the different perspectives of smart cities.’ — Vitor Braga, Associate Professor and Head of the Business Sciences Department, Polytechnic of Porto

A copy of the book can be ordered, here.

La Trobe Business School partners for Sport Development and Peace

Dr Emma Sherry

LBS Associate Professor Emma Sherry recently participated in the inaugural symposium on Sport for Development and Peace, hosted by the University of Illinois as an invited speaker and Town Hall panelist. The symposium, titled Forming Partnerships and Linkages in Sport for Development and Peace: Considerations, Tensions, and Strategies, brought together international academics and sport for development experts and practitioners to discuss how sport, specifically through the creation and nurturing of key partnerships, can be used to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

The purpose of the symposium was to bring together scholars, practitioners and students engaged in sport for development and peace (SDP) to create a dialogue about forming and sustaining partnerships and linkages between SDP initiatives and other sectors, the challenges facing partnership development, and strategies to overcome these challenges. The symposium was hosted by the Department of Recreation, Sport, and Tourism (RST) at the University of Illinois, the Sport+Development Lab (SDL), and Play for Change. The SDL is home to faculty and graduate students researching the intersection of sport and development. Play for Change is a registered student organization (RSO) focused on involving undergraduate and graduate students in actionable projects that use sport, recreation, and tourism for social change.

The sport for development and peace (SDP) field has grown exponentially in recent years, with more and more organizations, practitioners, and academics around the world embracing the possible contribution that sport can make to development agendas. SDP can occur at the individual, community, and societal levels. It can be defined as the use of sport as an engine for development through intercultural exchange, conflict resolution and peace building, community building, social inclusion, or programming for interpersonal development or health.

An emerging line of commentary in SDP concerns the nature of partnerships with various industry sectors. Without effective and sustainable partnerships, SDP organizations and scholars cannot viably engage in the field to effect social change; partnerships are the life blood of SDP organizations. However, many challenges and barriers exist that inhibit effective partnerships and linkages. From overcoming power dynamics, to misaligned goals and objectives, challenges can prevent organizations from establishing long-term partnerships and carrying out their missions. Given the international significance of partnerships and collaborations in SDP, much more conversation is needed about the nature of partnerships, their challenges, and effective strategies for forming and sustaining them.

The symposium brought together SDP experts, including Dr Sherry, to share presentations drawing on an original paper written for this symposium. Presenters provided a state of the field synopsis regarding partnerships with a specific sector (for example, health, community organisations, education or national and international bodies), outline challenges for developing and sustaining them, and then propose strategies for addressing these challenges.

In addition to the symposium, there were also two evening public events. On the first night, Dr. John Sugden, one of the world’s foremost experts in SDP and partnership development, provided a keynote address on the history and development of SDP, its current state of the field, and thoughts on developing and sustaining partnerships and linkages. The second night featured a town hall meeting with the symposium presenters focused on the power of sport to work for social good and change, and the challenges associated with doing so.

Dr Sherry noted that although the two-day symposium provided a full schedule for all attendees, the opportunity for international scholars in this field to spend time together to deeply discuss key research, theory-building and opportunities for research collaboration was invaluable. The opportunity for networking and discussion was extended through a very active use of Twitter by those organizing and attending (#sport4change2017) which extended the reach of the symposium to those unable to attend in person. Dr Sherry hopes that this is the first of many such events, and was delighted to be invited to present and share her research in the SDP field.

La Trobe Business School congratulates their Montpellier graduates!

Figure 1 L to R: Beverly Leligois, Bachelor Program Director. Sophie Meirieu Academic Program Director, Natalie Foulquier- Gazagnes Program Coordinator, Amandine Gomez Assistant, Bachelor Program

Through a longstanding partnership with Montpellier Business School, La Trobe Business School has offered French students the possibility to complete an LBS Bachelor of Business (International Business) as part of a double degree for over fourteen years.

Over the course of this partnership, La Trobe Business School has taught over one thousand students in Montpellier. The LBS program consist of seven subjects: six subjects delivered over three terms via LMS, along with one practical Business Project.

Through the Business Project, students follow a company of their choosing for a period of time. Afterwards, they present their findings on the organisation’s structure and what they have learnt to La Trobe Business School staff members, Montpellier School staff members and members of the nominated company.

Students graduate with an La Trobe University Bachelor of Business at the end of their program. Each year La Trobe hosts a graduation presentation in Montpellier for all participating students by La Trobe University and our Montpellier administration team (pictured above).

La Trobe Business School would like to congratulate all their Montpellier graduates!

Epping Secondary College VCE Business Forum at La Trobe Business School

By Erin Basinski

On Friday 17th February the Year 10 VCE and Year 11 Business Management Students from Epping Secondary College were invited to La Trobe University to take part in the 2017 VCE Business Forum.

The day began in the Szental Lecture Theatre where our students joined other VCE students from Lalor Secondary College, Macleod College and St Helena Secondary College. We were introduced to our first keynote speaker, Professor of Practice in Entrepreneurship Mr Antony Jacobson, who teaches at La Trobe Business School. The main focus of Mr Jacobson’s talk centered on the theme: “Focus on what you can do, not what you can’t do!” It was inspiring to hear his personal success stories. We were in awe when we discovered that Antony set up his first national franchise when he was only 17 years of age and still a student in Year 11. He spoke about the importance of a positive mindset particularly if we want to be successful in the future. “Be passionate, excite, and use passion in all that you do. Set the bar high. Never low, never in the middle, but high.” Professor of Practice Antony Jacobson said.

The rest of the day was then broken into three sessions. Our first session was with Roman Peretiako who is an associate Lecturer of Marketing at La Trobe Business School. We had the opportunity to discuss topics such as; what is Marketing, Market Segmentation and Target Markets. We were given the opportunity to come up with our own business concept and we were asked to consider the Marketing Mix:

  • PRODUCT – style, features, quality, brand
  • PRICE – How much should a business charge to recover the costs of marketing
  •  PLACE – How does a consumer obtain the product, physical retailer, online, factory outlet?
  • PROMOTION – What methods can be used to get a consumer’s attention, interest and desire?

Our second session was with Simon Crone who is the Manager of Content Development Programs at Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand. Mr Crone presented an interesting look at accounting and spoke about the importance of budgeting in the world of business. He too shared personal stories from his own career which demonstrated a strong personal commitment to the local community.

Our final session for the day was with Professor of Practice in Management Janet Rusell, at La Trobe Business School. In this workshop we had an opportunity to take a closer look at the iconic Australian juice brand, “Boost”. The main focus of this workshop was to think about a business concept, its development and its structure. We spoke about the sources of finance to help establish a start-up business, business locations and external factors that businesses need to consider when writing up a business plan.

Overall it was an enjoyable day which allowed us to see the bigger picture as to what our subject Business Management will cover this year. It was exciting to think that this year we will be given the opportunity to formulate our own business ideas and create a business plan with the hope to run our own business later on in the year.

Thank you to Ms Kanisiadis, Ms Hooper and Mrs Clark for organising and attending on the day.

La Trobe subjects among global elite

La Trobe University has cemented its position amongst the world’s top institutions in the latest QS World University Rankings by Subject.

La Trobe now ranks alongside the world’s elite in almost half of the subjects assessed – an increase of 25 per cent from last year.

Published annually since 2011, the rankings are based on research impact, as well as academic and employer reputation.

La Trobe’s now ranks in the top 50 (50th) globally and sixth nationally in the new QS category of Hospitality and Leisure Management. This is due to the academics linked to the University’s Bachelor of Business (Tourism and Hospitality), which has established connections to major players in the tourism, hospitality and events industry, as well as  world-class research.

Another four subject areas ranked in the world top 100:

  • Archaeology (5th nationally)
  • Nursing (11th nationally)
  • Sociology (7th nationally) and
  • Sports-related subjects (7th nationally)

Vice-Chancellor Professor John Dewar welcomed the rankings, which were released the same day the University celebrated its 50th anniversary.

“This is more proof of La Trobe’s long-standing international reputation, the strength of our teaching and research, plus the recognised calibre and employability of our graduates,” Professor Dewar said.

“Overall our academic reputation has improved in about three-quarters of the ranked subjects – which is a clear reflection of the outstanding work, dedication and expertise of our staff,” Professor Dewar said.

Other subjects to feature in the top 400 include: History, Linguistics, Philosophy, Agriculture & Forestry, Psychology, Accounting & Finance, Communication & Media Studies, Education, Law, English Language & English Literature, Modern Languages, Biological Sciences, Business & Management Studies, Economics & Econometrics and Computer Science & Information Systems.

How our expanded City Campus helps you succeed

By Kelly Griffin

Our expanded City Campus offers you greater learning opportunities and access to our premium concierge and Career-Ready Advantage services.

Located in the heart of Melbourne’s Central Business District, our updated state-of-the-art facilities and services are tailored to help you accelerate your career.

Location, location & flexible study options

Our City Campus is conveniently located on Collins Street to meet the needs of busy, working professionals. As many of our City Campus courses offer study options outside regular working hours, you can fit your study around full-time or part-time work without having to leave the CBD.

Flexible study options in the city centre are just one way our City Campus helps you succeed.

New teaching and learning spaces

In addition to occupying level 20 of the prestigious 360 Collins Street building, our City Campus now extends over levels 2 and 3 to offer you a variety of new and innovative teaching and collaborative learning spaces.

Premium Concierge & support services

At our City Campus, our dedicated Concierge team will be your first touchpoint for all postgraduate student enquiries.

Our Ask La Trobe team will now be available at the City Campus to answer questions about study and student life face to face.

These dedicated support services reflect the University’s commitment to ensuring our students receive the assistance they need in a timely manner.

city-campus-latrobe

Greater course options

We’ve increased our City Campus postgraduate program offerings to meet the demands of business professionals. Choose from our comprehensive suite of Master’s programs including the award-winning La Trobe MBA.

Many courses are available for intensive ‘block mode’ study as well as options for study outside normal working hours.

Career Ready Advantage

As part of Career Ready Advantage, there will be support opportunities and workshops at the city campus for all students during the year. Career Ready Advantage is a program that helps you build your skills, manage your career, track and assess your progress, unlock rewards and build your portfolio, so that when you complete your course, you’re ready to hit the ground running.

To find out more about how our City Campus can off you the flexibility you need to accelerate your career, register for a one-on-one consultation and speak with one of our postgraduate course specialists.

This post was orginally published on the La Trobe University Knowledge Blog.

 

MBA student Travis Lovett wins the Institute of Public Administration Australian (Victoria Division) Young Indigenous Leader Scholarship.

By Geraldine Kennett

Travis Lovett completed his Graduate Diploma in Management (Public Sector) in 2016 and is currently undertaking an MBA with La Trobe Business School (LBS).
Travis joined the Victorian Public Service in 2008, following experience working with Aboriginal community organisations including the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO).

His first public service role was with the Department of Justice in the Koori Justice Unit where he was instrumental in boosting the Aboriginal workforce of the justice department. In 2012, he was appointed Manager of the Koori Courts in Court Services Victoria where he had policy leadership and oversight of the operation of the Koori Courts.

Travis’s attainment of his LBS Graduate Diploma in Management (Public Sector) supported his appointment to a senior executive role in 2016 with the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning where he assists in developing Water for Victoria, the government’s new long-term direction for managing Victoria’s precious water resources. The Water Plan recognises the values that water has for Traditional Owners and Aboriginal Victorians, and commits the water sector to support Aboriginal participation in Victorian water planning and management frameworks through consultative structures that address the rights and interests of Victoria’s Traditional Owners. Travis is playing a key role in ensuring that the department’s engagement with Traditional Owners and Aboriginal communities supports the water plan’s objectives.

As Manager, Koori Courts, Travis demonstrated his ability to work collaboratively with a broad range of stakeholders to address a challenging set of issues. Travis’ ability to work with each stakeholder group ensures they have input into the design and operation of the initiative was a key part of the initiative’s success. An independent evaluation found that the Koori Court has better engagement within the justice system for Aboriginal Victorians, helping offenders to address the causes of their offending and helping prevent re-offending.

Travis has actively participated in a mentoring relationship with a senior executive, and provided strong professional and cultural support to other Indigenous and non-Indigenous staff. He has been identified as having strong executive potential in the Victorian Public Service. His personal and professional qualities demonstrate a willingness and potential to take full advantage of the professional development opportunities offered by the scholarship. Travis shows initiative in his work, and extends himself above and beyond his ‘position description’ to contribute to the organisations he works with – offering constructive ideas and following through. His ambition is matched by his potential. Travis’ further studies (Masters of Business Administration at La Trobe University, 2014-2017) demonstrate his intellectual capability, his curiosity, and his commitment to professional development.

How our MBA graduates are giving back

By Kelly Griffin

An MBA can advance your career, increase your earning potential and strengthen your network with fellow business leaders.

The professional advantages of pursuing an MBA are widely reported, but what’s less highlighted is the remarkable way our MBA graduates are using their acquired knowledge and networks to give back to their communities.

Here’s how three MBA graduates are giving back.

bernie-squire

Bernie Squire

Bus Manager Wodonga Chamber of Commerce, MBA Grad 2016, Board Member AW Regional Cancer Centre Trust Fund

Why did you decide to study an MBA? 

I was made redundant from a senior management role in the finance industry and I was having difficulty finding another suitable role. After talking with a careers adviser I decided to do an MBA for a couple of reasons; to gain academic credibility and also a better chance of employment at the senior executive/director level. The La Trobe MBA really appealed to me because of the flexible delivery blend of ‘face to face’, ‘block intensive’, and ‘video conference’ unit delivery.

What was one of your greatest learnings or takeaways from your MBA? 

I really benefitted from the cohort network that you develop, including the in-class discussion and debate. I guess for me, however, the biggest takeaways were: a greater appreciation of diversity; the ability to research and reflect on critical issues; and, a heightened awareness of corporate responsibility and sustainability issues.

How did doing your MBA help you give back? 

As the manager of the local Chamber of Commerce, I’ve used my new sustainability knowledge to connect with organisations like ‘The Benefits Corporation’ and ‘Blabs Australia and New Zealand’.  We have run a number of Chamber events focussed around being a Conscious Business and increasing our local businesses awareness of their impact in a global economy.

Angela Kelly angela-kelly

Proposal Manager, Veolia Water. MBA Grad 2016

Why did you decide to study an MBA?

I’ve always really enjoyed learning and was looking for a way to expand my knowledge in a formal way. At the same time, I was looking to progress my career to a higher level.

While I felt that my engineering degree had given me a great technical base, I wanted to develop my business skills and improve my ability to work with others.

What was one of your greatest learnings or takeaways from your MBA?

My greatest learning of the MBA is the understanding that working with people who are different to me is not a problem but is actually a benefit.

Having a diverse team that is open to new ideas provides you with a competitive advantage in the market place. Part of this learning is that constructive conflict can actually be beneficial as it is a sign that people are engaged in their work and that they care about the outcomes.

How did doing your MBA help you give back?

The things I learned during the MBA provided me with the courage to provide support and guidance to less experienced colleagues to improve their outcomes. The MBA also raised my awareness of how important equality is for our community.  Women’s education is the best way to improve the lifestyles of communities and their future generations.

Knowing that in Australia the Indigenous community is the most disadvantaged, I used my MBA skills to organise a fundraiser to raise over $3,000 for Indigenous literacy.

Hodi Beauliv low resHodi Beauliv

Executive Management Business Development Sunraysia Community Health, MBA Grad 2015, on Board of Mallee Track Health and Community Services

Why did you decide to study an MBA?

It’d been over 15 years since I’d completed my first degree at La Trobe, so I knew I needed to do something to bring my skills up to date.

I spoke to a staff member at the La Trobe Bendigo Open Day about my passion for social justice and my management aspirations. She recommended La Trobe’s MBA given its focus on sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility.

The ability to complete some semester long units by teleconference in Bendigo, but also the opportunity to meet face-to-face with people from all over the State when completing block units, really appealed to me.

How did doing your MBA help you give back?

After completing my MBA I was exhausted, but passionate to do something to give back to the community.

I am now an Executive Manager in a rural Community Health Service in Mildura. In this role I help drive change to develop services that meet the needs of our local community. I am able to raise new and innovative ideas of how this can be done, with a focus on sustainability of the service, not just short term outcomes, by bringing a corporate social responsibility management focus to my work.

On a personal level, I have also joined the Mallee Track Health & Community Services Board.  Mallee Track covers a large number of small rural communities. By participating on the Board I am able to contribute to the sustainability of the organisation, by ensuring appropriate governance practices are in place for the successful long-term operation of the Health Service.

La Trobe University’s founding Vice-Chancellor, Professor David Myers, once said: ‘The true measure of a university’s greatness is the total effect it has on human welfare and progress’.

We’re extremely proud that our MBA graduates have been able to succeed in their chosen profession while also using their acquired skills to help out others and strengthen their community.

Find out more about studying an MBA or book a one-to-one consultation to discuss your study options.

This article was originally published on The Knowledge Blog.

Regional brain drain worsens

An Australian-first study has revealed regional students across every state and territory are turning to metropolitan universities at an unprecedented rate.

The new study, funded by the National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education (NCSEHE) at Curtin University, and led by La Trobe University researchers, LBS’s Dr Buly Cardak and Matt Brett and Dr Mark Bowden of Swinburne University, shows the number of regional students across Australia moving to a city location to study increased by more than 76% between 2008 and 2014.

“We found the growth in regional students relocating to metropolitan universities far outstrips growth of regional students taking up higher education places in either their home town or another regional location. However, regional students studying in regional locations are still a majority, and are attracted to a small number of larger regional centres,” La Trobe Business School’s Associate Professor Buly Cardak said.

“This growth was particularly strong with more flexible modes of study. We found mature aged students, students with disabilities, or those wanting to study part-time are increasingly turning to city campuses.”

The researchers used enrollment data drawn from the Department of Education and Training from 2008-2014 which uniquely classifies students as regional based on their residential location when they started university.

“Previous information only accounted for students’ current home addresses. Using this new information we can see that the number of regional students enrolling in university has grown by almost 39% over this period.”

“This is in stark comparison to the conventional wisdom based on existing data, which shows the growth rate in regional student numbers is slightly lower than the rate of growth in metropolitan student numbers”

The report also indicated that regional students likely to face financial constraints are no less likely to attend university, and are instead displaying a greater likelihood of graduation.

“Our findings turn a lot of commonly held perceptions about regional students on their head, and is likely to have significant implications for the sector.”

“For example, how might the Government prioritise funding allocations, now that we know an increasing number of regional students are instead choosing metropolitan campuses? Do they invest more in the city, providing infrastructure and support for migrating students or do they increase incentives for students to stay in or return to regional locations where skilled graduates are in short supply?”

NCSEHE Director Professor Sue Trinidad said the report offers a new perspective on regional participation and paves the way for future discussion and policy advancements.

“The findings of this report are positive. It provides an evidence base for what is really happening with regional students accessing higher education. The issue now is the challenge of attracting graduates back to our regional areas, and the associated policy implications,” Professor Trinidad said.

The report, Regional student Participation and Migration, is available from the NCSEHE website.

Editor’s note:

The NCSEHE aims to inform public policy design and implementation and institutional practice to improve the higher education participation and success for marginalised and disadvantaged people.

La Trobe University is Victoria’s third oldest University. Established in 1971 it is now firmly entrenched in the world’s top 400 universities. It currently has more than 36,000 students and is the largest provider of higher education in regional Victoria.

 

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