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La Trobe Business School

Month: November 2016 (page 1 of 2)

LBS student Achan Amol on her overseas internship: “It was an unforgettable experience”

On top of the Helipad Bar gazing at the Petronas Towers

On top of the Helipad Bar gazing at the Petronas Towers

By Achan Amol

Going into my second year of studies in a Bachelor of Business (Tourism and Hospitality) at LBS, I was eager to travel, as travel has been a massive passion of mine. In June/July 2016 I travelled to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, with the help of the study abroad team who got in contact with an organisation called CISaustralia. The La Trobe Study Abroad team gave me a tremendous level of support in enhancing my trip, so that it became an unforgettable experience. I was advised of the opportunity to do an internship abroad. Then the rest of the work was completed by the awesome team at The Global Student who worked together with CISaustralia to find me a great position at a four star hotel called Crystal Crown Hotel, Petaling Jaya. I worked there at the front desk of the hotel as a receptionist.

During my six weeks at the Crystal Crown Hotel, I was able to put the theory that I had learnt in my first year of studies into action in a practical environment. I was greeting, checking guests in and out, making bookings, answering phone calls and undertaking all the other duties that came with the position I was working in. I also learnt a great deal about culture as a majority of the guests coming into the hotel were either locals or international visitors from all paths of life. The opportunity to work as an intern in Malaysia has broadened my perspective of the world around me and made me aware of the different cultures around the globe.

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With my final year just around the corner this internship gave me hands on experience in an ideal potential future job that I could undertake after completing my degree. Being able to work as a full time intern overseas opens a wide range of career opportunities and also provides opportunities such as networking, experiencing a new culture and meeting new people.  I highly recommend it.

Achan Amol is in her second year of studies in a Bachelor of Business (Tourism and Hospitality) at La Trobe Business School.

A New Beginning for Women in Sport?

By Merryn Sherwood

2015 was declared a watershed year for women in sport. The Matildas barnstorming run at the 2015 Women’s FIFA World Cup. The Australian Diamonds triumphant win in the Netball World Cup in front of a world-record crowd. The Southern Stars held the No.1 ranking for all three forms of the game. Michelle Payne won the Melbourne Cup. However, the doubters questioned whether it would stick.

But in 2016 the momentum continued. The highest-rating Saturday night AFL game in Melbourne was the women’s exhibition match at Whitten Oval. Cricket NSW announced that the Breakers would be the first domestic Australian women’s team to be fully professional. In 2017, Australia will welcome a new Australian netball league with a salary cap of $675,000 for 10 players, and a brand new AFL league for women.

But is the rise of women’s sport opportunity, or opportunism? Are sports organisations coming around to the idea that they should provide equal opportunities for female athletes, or is it simply good business sense to do so? This was the topic of a panel at this year’s Sports Writers Festival. The consensus was it’s probably a bit of both.

A panel that included broadcaster and documentary maker Angela Pippos, former SBS Zela editor Danielle Warby, Age sports editor Chloe Saltau and freelance journalist Karen Lyon – hosted by Lynn Haultain – discussed several reasons why women’s sport was booming.

These included that more women are playing more sport than ever before, and within that contact has been normalised and even admired. Alongside this, there the suggestion that sports organisations have realised that there is an audience for women’s sport.

Put simply the key triggers appear to be that more women are playing sport, many of them in traditionally male dominated fields, and more sports fans are enjoying watching them. Saltau noted that this led to a situation where there is an “arms race” for female athletes. Major sporting codes suddenly aren’t just providing opportunities for women to play, they have been trying to outbid each other to become the sport of choice for women at the elite level. Suddenly, there has never been more value in women’s sport.

But as a sports journalism lecturer and sports media researcher, one of the most interesting points in the panel for me was the recognition that the sports media narrative around women’s sport is changing. Historically sports media has trivialised women and coverage was often sexualised.

Some of my previous research in this area found though that Australian journalists and editors had started to question these news values. For example, a journalist said this about stories on women’s sport:

“You know, a lot of the editorial decisions you see here are made on instinct, thinking we want to see Sharapova in a pretty dress, we want to see those sorts of images and those sorts of stories in the paper but, is that what people are genuinely interested in?”

The consensus in the room at the Sports Writers Festival would suggest the landscape has moved forward again. In fact, the panel noted that “that Sam Newman way” of seeing the world is shrinking. Instead, we are seeing thoughtful stories about players with thoroughly interesting backgrounds, such as Moana Hope and Susan Alberti.

There is still be work to done. The panel noted an important step in adding legitimacy to coverage of women’s sport is to include female commentators and experts in it. But generally, there was a feeling that the ongoing professionalism of women’s sport is starting to be reflected in its coverage.

As Angela Pippos aptly noted on the panel, “I’ve spent a few months thinking wow, I’m going to see change in my lifetime.” While Pippos was at the time talking about the chance for women to earn living wages playing sport, it’s also applicable to the representation of female athletes in the media.

You can listen to the entire panel, here.

 

Merryn Sherwood is a member of the Centre for Sport and Social Impact, and coordinates the Sports Journalism major in the Bachelor of Media and Communication. La Trobe University is a partner of the Sports Writers Festival.

 

Sustainable Business Examples from Around the World – Italy, Australia, and New Zealand

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By Giselle Weybrecht

As businesses become more and more engaged in sustainability around the world, we are presented with an increasing range of examples of active companies. However, when I speak with students and faculty, they say that they often hear about the same examples from the same international companies over and over again.

In an attempt to share some new best practice examples, I asked a handful of faculty members from around the world about their favourite classroom examples of local companies that are actively involved in sustainability. Here are some examples from Italy, Australia, and New Zealand.

Manuela Brusoni and Veronica Vecchi, SDA Bocconi School of Management, Italy

Consumer banking sector Intesa Sanpaolo: Within the Intesa Sanpaolo Group, Banca Prossima is the bank with the mission of serving non-profit organisations, with a specific service model, products and consulting services dedicated to this type of customers. The Bank has developed a rating model for social businesses that integrates the traditional methods of bank analysis with elements peculiar to the third sector, such as the ability in fundraising. Furthermore, Banca Prossima launched in 2011 “Terzo Valore”, a crowdfunding portal which allows anyone to lend or donate money to non-profit organisation projects directly, without intermediaries and with principal repayment guaranteed by the Bank.

Food sector Barilla: Barilla is the top quality and leading pasta producer in the world, which promotes the mediterranean diet as the best and healthiest solution for the people and the planet. Barilla founded the Barilla Centre for Food and Nutrition (BCFN) to informs not only policy makers and insiders of the agri-food chain, but all the people on the big topics linked to food and nutrition with regards to climate change and the world’s paradoxes. Barilla has been considered the most sustainable pasta supplier by the “Sustainability Index Programme” of Walmart.

Fashion Brunello Cucinelli: The core mission of the company is based on a contemporary form of humanism that over the years the international press has identified as a “humanistic” capitalism, where profit can be sought without damaging mankind. Its clients view Brunello Cucinelli as an expression of a sophisticated concept of contemporary lifestyle and the brand is firmly rooted in quality excellence, Italian craftsmanship and creativity; these pillars are considered the foundations on which sustainable growth can be built in the long run.

Learn more about how SDA Bocconi is engaging students in impact investing.

Suzanne Young, La Trobe Business School, Australia

Yarra Valley Water which has mapped their practices against the SDGs based on understanding what issues the organisation can influence.. These included clean water and sanitation, industry innovation and infrastructure and gender equality.

As another example, the National Australia Bank has a focus on working towards a more inclusive society, including financial inclusion. They are using the SDGs as a way to mobilise innovation to drive business and societal success. The Bank is supporting agribusiness customers to value natural capital for instance. The SDG of Decent Work and Economic Growth and No Poverty provide a lens for their work, especially in impact investing.

Learn more about La Trobe’s participation in the CR3+ Network.

Christian Schott, Victoria Business School, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

The youth hostel association of NZ is one of the largest accommodation providers for budget conscious travellers in NZ and have set sustainability as a guiding principle for the entire organisation.  Their efforts to integrate economic, environmental and social sustainability have been exemplary and they are willing to take calculated risks to trial new or innovative ideas that have the potential to enhance their sustainability ambitions.  I have been working closely with YHA Wellington which is an exemplar of the broader YHA NZ network.

Whale Watch Kaikoura An inspirational Maori owned and Maori operated tourism business that carefully balances the need for environmental and economic sustainability with a strong commitment to social and cultural sustainability. Both Maori cultural interpretation and environmental protection are core principles of this whale watching business.

Learn more about how Christian Schott is bringing technology into the classroom to teach sustainability.

This post was originally published on the UNPRME’s Primitime blog.

The Big Idea Competition: La Trobe University with two teams in the Grand final

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La Trobe University has not only made the finals of the prestigious The Big Idea Competition, but is the only university in Australia to have two teams come through the semi-final round and into the 2016 grand final of the nationwide competition.

Social Entrepreneurship program

For several years now, La Trobe Business School has offered participation in The Big Idea Competition to students from all over the university as an elective part of their undergraduate curriculum. The competition, initiated by The Big Issue, aims to find and deliver solutions to help homeless, marginalised and disadvantaged people to positively change their lives. In 2016, more than 100 business plans from students were submitted from more than 11 universities throughout Australia and this year La Trobe had 17 teams and 66 undergraduate students enter the competition.

Embedded in a La Trobe Business School subject, Social Entrepreneurship: The Big Idea, the competition sees students collaborate in multi-disciplinary teams to design their own social enterprise – a commercial enterprise which creates social value – under the guidance of entrepreneurship expert LBS Professor of Practice Antony Jacobson  and with strong support from teaching and professional staff across the university. The best project is then chosen via a round of internal judging, before being formally submitted to the Big Idea competition. In 2016 La Trobe University got the added advantage of having one further team selected as a wild card entry based on merit by the Big Idea judges.

“Seeing students from different disciplines work together to make a positive change is a great way for them to learn,” Professor of Practice Antony Jacobson said. “Not to mention that the competition values align very closely with our own La Trobe Business School values of responsible leadership and social entrepreneurship. On top of this, it locks in seamlessly with the broader values of La Trobe University – we want to make a difference.”

Free Moora Moora & HomeMore 

The 2016 teams from La Trobe University that have made the final are Free Moora Moora (FMM) and HomeMore.

After seeing the disturbing footage of the treatment of imprisoned children from the Don Dale Detention Centre on Four Corners, two LBS event management students Teagan Giggins and Keeliah Frost developed FMM to help lower recidivism rates among young Indigenous people, and reduce the overrepresentation of Indigenous youth in jails and detention centres.

The students were inspired by recent research conducted on emotional intelligence in aged care facilities at La Trobe University. The research focussed on equipping nursing staff with the right tools to manage emotional labour and stress through training. Encouraged by the positive results of this initiative, both students saw an opportunity for providing emotional intelligence and cultural competency training for corrections staff as a way of improving conditions for Indigenous juveniles in detention. The team also aimed to provide employment pathways, skills development and healing support for indigenous young people within Australia’s justice system.

Similarly to FMM, the students from HomeMore drew on their diverse backgrounds, strengths and degree knowledge to develop an ambitious initiative – the project aims to address property affordability levels for single women, while simultaneously reducing Australia’s carbon foot print.

Team members Michael Hutchison, Yianni Polydorou and Marrissa Garner discovered that a carbon-positive SOLCER (Smart Operation for a Low Carbon Energy Region) House can be constructed in under sixteen weeks. Studying Business (Michael and Yianna are both Business students in La Trobe Business School, majoring in leadership and marketing respectively), and Psychology (Marissa is currently completing a BA in Psychological Science), they brought their different perspectives together to see how the Solcer Houses can create renewable energy and save Victorian families up to $140 in energy bills, while putting profits towards helping single disadvantaged parents to purchase their own Solcer house via a rent-to-buy scheme.

“I am thrilled we are the only university in Australia to have two teams competing in the national inter-university 2016 competition finals,” subject coordinator and lead lecturer for LBS’s Social Entrepreneurship: The Big Idea subject Professor of Practice Antony Jacobson said. “This achievement is truly testament to both our passionate, committed, and hard-working students and the Business School’s unparalleled teaching and support.”

The competition finals will take place on 29 November 2016. We wish both teams the best of luck!

LBS’s Associate Professor Suzanne Young featured on ABC Radio 774’s Mornings with Waleed Aly discussing governance

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Recently, LBS’s Associate Professor Suzanne Young was featured on ABC Radio 774’s Mornings. On the show, she spoke about how the two-strike rule works, and how Board spills can happen in the 2016 round of Annual General Meetings due to protest votes on Remuneration reports.

If you missed the report, listen to the full fragment here. Associate Professor Suzanne Young speaks around the 2:25:00 mark.

4 tips we picked up from the LBS Women in Leadership Workshop

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On 20 October 2016, La Trobe Business School hosted its first Intellectual Climate Fund event, a workshop titled: “Women’s Leadership in Business Schools: Opportunities and Challenges”. The workshop was developed by PhD students and was aimed at PhD students and Early Career Researchers. Attendees had the opportunity to discuss current issues with our successful academics. The panel included Professor of Accounting and Associate Head of La Trobe Business School Jane HamiltonLBS’s Professor of Practice Susan Inglis, LBS’s Associate Professor Suzanne O’Keefe,  Head of La Trobe Business School Paul Mather, Dr Jeanette Fyffe from RED and Professor and Associate Pro Vice-Chancellor (Academic Partnerships) Amalia Di Iorio who chaired the session

The panel spoke about leadership in business schools, and what the opportunities and challenges are for women in this context. According to panel members, there is a great pipeline of female PhD students at business schools, but there is leakage in this pipeline – women are statistically much less likely to end up in a leadership position within the school.

What can women in professional environments do to improve these outcomes?  Among a range of issues discussed by the panel, here we identify four key themes that emerged.

1. Redefine your work: beat the imposter syndrome

Imposter syndrome – an inability to internalize accomplishments and a persistent fear of being exposed as a “fraud” – is a common problem among women in professional environments. For the community, it’s important to ask where this phenomenon comes from, and how we can enhance women’s belief in themselves as leaders. “Sometimes it is as simple as redefining your activities,” panel member Associate Professor Suzanne O’Keefe said. “If you are organising a workshop on leadership, don’t look at the footwork– organising catering, inviting people et cetera – as women’s work, but rather, see it as what it is: showing initiative and bringing people together, it will then be easier to see yourself as a leader as well.”

2. Negotiate!

Research has indicated that women are a lot less likely to negotiate their salary than men, especially when it’s not clear if negotiation is expected or not. Research has shown that men negotiate more, and apply for positions with higher salaries more readily and at an earlier stage than women. Associate Pro Vice-Chancellor Professor Amalia Di Iorio, was encouraging: “As a woman, don’t be afraid to negotiate, speak up, and take opportunities when they arrive.”

3. Don’t be afraid to challenge feedback.

Panel members also reminded attendees that women shouldn’t hold back when it comes to asking for feedback, or, if you are not sure what certain feedback means, to step forward and ask your manager to clarify their feedback. As a panel member noted, “If you are worried about feedback, take initiative and ask why, respectfully. There is always a chance that it is a misunderstanding, and there is always value in raising this in a conversation.”

4. Have a support network around you.

Receiving difficult feedback is hard for anyone, no matter where you are in your career. It’s important to separate what you are from what you do, and not take things personally. Having a support network around you can help with this: “I find it incredibly useful to have a support network around me, consisting of a number of people from different backgrounds,” Professor of Practice Susan Inglis said. “Talking rough feedback over with peers is a valuable tool to get different perspectives, and see what your options are going forward.”

Collaborating across borders – The CR3+ Network

PRME La Trobe Business School

By Giselle Weybrecht

La Trobe Business School in Australia has been a PRME signatory since 2008 and an active PRME Champion. They joined forces with several other PRME Signatories to create CR3+ Network. Together the network provides a supportive platform to build international collaboration and enables the participant business schools to work with the PRME and build international and national capacity in Responsible Management Education. I spoke with Associate Professor Suzanne Young, Head of Department and Dr Swati Nagpal, Department of Management and Marketing, from La Trobe Business School, about their participation in this network.

What is the CR3+ Network and how did it come about?

La Trobe Business School has been working with ISAE (Brazil), Audencia Nantes School of Management (France) and Hanken School of Economics (Finland) since 2008 in an effort to exchange ideas, pedagogy, curriculum and research in the area of corporate responsibility. Head of LBS, Professor Paul Mather wrote: “With the support of the Principles for Responsible Executive Education, the CR3+ network’s objective is to promote a debate, inspire changes and propose solutions for challenges related to sustainability and governance, interacting and reaching what UNESCO calls ‘The 5th Pillar of Education: Learning to change and to change society.’”

What are the key features of the programme?

A key outcome of the partnership has been the hosting of an annual CR3+ conference, which has been held at each of the member institutions. Past themes have included governance and sustainability; CSR: expanding horizons, and the power of responsibility. The aim of the CR3+ conferences is to strengthen the partnership and dialogue around sustainability and responsibility, and provide a forum where ideas, developments and concerns in regards to these issues and the work of the PRME can be brought forward.

How is CR3+ different than other similar networks you are part of? How did you meet these specific schools and decide to create a network? 

It involves four schools that are strongly committed to PRME, and which later became PRME Champions, so PRME is very much at the core of CR3+. The network has been driven by the will to learn from each other, bearing in mind that the four schools are from very different and distant parts of the world (Australia, Brazil, Finland and France). From a very early point the core idea was to create a platform for these learning possibilities by organizing a conference involving all 3 (later 4) schools.

What have been some of the challenges? 

The schools are different and distant, not only in geographical terms but also in cultural and institutional terms. Creating special exchanges for students, for example, has faced a number of practical challenges related to differences in terms of tuition fees, types of study programmes, periods of studies, accreditations, etc. Different expectations about the conference have also caused some challenges but overall the learning opportunities and outcomes have far outweighed the challenges.

Successes? 

We have now done one full round of CR3+ conferences (in all 4 schools) and are about to start a second cycle. The mobilization from the different schools has been on the rise – for example, ISAE/FGV researchers have sent many abstracts to the CR3+ conference to be organized in Helsinki – and there has been growing integration between CR3+ events and PRME chapters – the conference in Helsinki will also be tied to a doctoral course organized by the PRME Chapter Nordic (more specifically Hanken, Stockholm School of Economics, BI Norwegian School of Management and CBS).

The CR3+ network has also enabled joint research projects and resulting publications as well as student and staff exchanges.

In autumn 2011, LBS hosted a masters-level exchange student from Hanken to work on a community development project.  Similar student exchanges are currently being planned for LBS students to have the opportunity to extend PRME –related projects at the other CR3+ partner universities.

In 2015, a collaboration between LBS and ISAE tested a new approach to ‘Promoting internationalisation and cross-cultural competency through online collaboration’, which provided opportunities for LBS MBA students to engage in an academic cross-cultural experience with Masters students from ISAE.  The students replicated real-world global communication, by collaborating virtually with people from a different cultural background in real time and jointly solving a series of management problems using online software.

What advice would you have for other schools thinking of putting something similar into place?

The network’s success is due to the relationships between key academic staff in each of the business schools and is also based in their common belief in and focus on the goals of the PRME mission. Members of the network were all early adopters of the PRME and champions of change in their respective institutions. Each School brings to the network their own expertise and demonstrates the national differences in Responsibility and Sustainability initiatives that are seen in academia, industry and government.

Each of the business schools have supported the CR3+ network as they acknowledge that working collaboratively provides greater opportunities for staff and students than working alone. Benefits in research, teaching, partnerships and dialogue have been demonstrated and the parties remain excited about opportunities that are coming from working with others in the new SDG project

What’s next for the initiative?

A pilot project is currently being led by LBS with support from the CR3+ network focused on facilitating a series of national workshops in each country between PRME higher education business schools and members of the UN Global Compact Network to present and interact on the theme of the SDGs. The outcomes of the workshops will be improved dialogue and networks between universities and other sectors, and the initiating of joint projects on the SDGs.

The 5th CR3+ conference will be held at Hanken School of Economics in Helsinki on 28-29 April 2017. The theme of the conference is ‘Making Corporate Responsibility Useful’, where the dominant logic of the ‘business case’ argument for CSR, and the legitimising effect this has on business engagement in CSR, will be brought into question.

This post was originally published on the UNPRME’s Primitime blog.

LBS’s Liam Lenten featured on ABC’s Radio 666 Canberra discussing the Brownlow Medal

 Liam Lenten Sports La Trobe Business School Federal Election

Recently, Dr Liam Lenten was featured on ABC’s Radio 666 Canberra, talking about his research on the voting process in the AFL’s Brownlow Medal (the ‘Best and Fairest’ award). In his research, Dr Liam Lenten analysed how umpires vote and whether they have any biases.

During the segment, Dr Lenten says he became motivated to test for how Indigenous players draw votes from umpires early on in the project – a time at which there were a number of unsavoury incidents involving adverse fan behaviour (particularly) towards now-retired Sydney star Adam Goodes.

‘As economists, we are interested in voting biases whenever and wherever they occur, as they violate the notion of pure rationality. There are many examples in the literature involving data from various competitive environments, including many from sports, but also political elections, and even song contests such as Eurovision or Idol’, Dr Lenten says.

In this case, he employs econometric modelling and regression techniques, as well as a comprehensive database of over 100,000 player-within-match observations, in all of the 2,288 home-and-away AFL matches from 1998-2010.

Lenten says ‘…when I compared the number of votes between groups, Indigenous players quantitatively poll 6.6% more average votes per match than non-Indigenous players – this difference was statistically significant, but only weakly so’.

He qualifies this by saying that this alone does not imply a voting bias: “The comparison does not account for various factors, which could be driving the result. One possible explanation is that the pool of Indigenous players in the AFL is simply drawn from a higher-distribution of talent than non-Indigenous players. Aspiring Indigenous footballers are more likely to be from regional and remote areas, consistent with being at an elite-level recruitment disadvantage.”

According to Lenten, if this explanation is true, then such differences in talent levels should be picked up by using player performance measures. Specifically, he uses a range of 13 well-known player-level match statistics; such as kicks, handballs, goals scored, and tackles.

The model results show that controlling for player performance explains most (but not quite all) of the difference in average votes awarded. Indigenous players still poll approximately 1.2% more votes than non-indigenous players.

Is this remaining difference evidence that umpires unfairly give more votes to Indigenous players? As a former 200-game umpire himself (at suburban level), Dr Lenten is open to this possibility, but not committal.

‘There could be other productive actions off the ball for which Indigenous players outperform their contemporaries that are not captured within the statistics I use, yet are nonetheless noticed by umpires’. Also, he says: ‘…with respect to goals, it may be that Indigenous players often kick goals with higher degrees of difficulty, which would imply that not all goals have the same vote impact’.

Listen to the full fragment on the ABC website, here (Dr Liam Lenten speaks around the 3:26:00 mark).

2016 CPSGAP Public Sector Forum

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La Trobe University’s Centre for Public Sector Governance, Accountability and Performance (CPSGAP) invites you to attend its 2016 Public Sector Forum.

Speakers

Professor Andrew Podger (Australian National University)

Professor Andrew Podger will speak about Retirement incomes policy in the context of budget repair.

Professor John Wanna (Australian National University)

Professor John Wanna will speak about Budget repair: the elusive surplus.

Professor Christine Wong (University of Melbourne)

Professor Christine Wong will speak about China’s efforts to install risk management.

Event Details

Date: 1 December 2016

Time: 11.00 am – 4.00 pm (a light lunch will be served)

Location: La Trobe University City Campus, Level 20, 360 Collins Street, Melbourne

Register: Please RSVP by Thursday 24 November. Contact CPSGAP Executive Director Professor Zahirul Hoque via email, and register via the corresponding La Trobe University event page.

 

Health and Aged Care Industries in China: Change and Opportunities

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The China Studies Research Centre, the Building Healthy Communities RFA’s Healthy Ageing Research Group (HARG) and La Trobe Business School jointly invite you to attend this seminar.

Dr Chuyang Liu will share her reflections and provide insights into the changing landscape of the Chinese health and aged care industry which has created significant opportunities for Australian companies.

China’s demand for health and aged care services is expected to grow significantly over the next decade, driven by the needs of a rapidly growing population, an ageing demographic, new health challenges and government policy reforms.

In 2020, China’s population is expected to reach 1.4 billion, of which 248 million will be aged 60 years and above. These elderly citizens will require accommodation in facilities that support their medical needs and lifestyle, and a qualified workforce to care for them – both of which are in short supply.

The Chinese Government has embarked on an ambitious program to transform the country’s health and aged care industry. It is accelerating reform across the industry, including integrating healthcare and aged care services; introducing policies to attract private capital from domestic and overseas investors; and encouraging the adoption of smart healthcare. The changing landscape of the Chinese health and aged care industry has created significant opportunities for Australian companies.

About the Speaker

Dr Chuyang LIU, China Adviser, International Operations, Austrade. Dr Chuyang Liu has recently returned to Australia from her previous role as Trade Commissioner/Counsellor Commercial in the Australian Embassy in Beijing, China. Chuyang is now China Adviser based in Austrade’s Melbourne office. Prior to joining Austrade in July 2012, Chuyang worked at the Department of Business and Innovation in the Victorian State Government of Australia.

Chuyang is a specialist in international law and WTO law, with extensive experiences in Australia, Europe (mainly Switzerland and the UK), and Asian countries (China, Malaysia, Japan and Korea) during her 24 years’ career.

Chuyang has a PhD of International Economic Law from University of Bern (Switzerland), Master of Business Administration (MBA) from Victoria University (Australia), Master of Maritime Law from Dalian Maritime University, Bachelor of British & American Literature from Dalian Foreign Language University, China.

Event Details

Date:    Monday 21 November 2016

Time:   2:00-3:30pm

Venue: Room 203, Health Sciences 1, La Trobe University

Register: To register, please visit the corresponding La Trobe University event page.

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